• eat
  • shop
  • see
  • go
  • stay
  • daytrip
  • map
  • calendar
  • transport
  • weather
  • currency
  • tofrom

Whistler

Hit the Bullseye at Forged Axe Throwing

By SHERI RADFORD

Suit up in your favourite flannel and take a shot at this Canuck sport. (Photo by Justa Jeskova/Tourism Whistler)

As Monty Python sang, many years ago, “I’m a lumberjack, and I’m okay.” Release your own inner lumberjack at Forged Axe Throwing, where a one-hour drop-in session lets you practise this quintessentially Canadian sport. It’s so popular that locals have started a competitive league—beard and plaid shirt not required (but definitely encouraged).

Unlock the Adventure at Escape! Whistler

By SHERI RADFORD
Dec. 2017

Break free from reality for a fun afternoon of puzzling and code-cracking at Escape! Whistler.

Karen Mizukami and Kori Klusmeier first noticed the trend of escape rooms while travelling around Europe. They then spent ages planning one of their own, developing a challenge of just the right level of difficulty—or so they thought. During test runs, participants were never able to complete more than a third of the scenario before time ran out. The couple have clearly perfected their craft now, and their four escape rooms are constantly busy. Locals who solved all four clamoured for a new challenge, so Mizukami and Klusmeier recently dismantled their very first room and set up a brand-new one. Each room is as elaborate as a small film set—complete with dramatic lighting and a soundtrack—and its secrets are more closely guarded than a Game of Thrones script. Are you smart enough to follow the clues and crack the codes? Find out at Escape! Whistler.

 

Shop Local at the Made in Whistler Market

By CHLOË LAI

Wrap yourself up in warm memories of Whistler with upcycled pieces by Re:creation Designs

Dec. 16 to Mar. 31, 2017 For one-of-a-kind keepsakes infused with mountain spirit, go straight to the source: the Made In Whistler Market. Every Saturday, local artisans gather to showcase their handmade wares. Find everything from pottery and fine art to jewellery and artisanal foods, all created by folks with deep roots in the great outdoors. The vibe may be laid-back, but the designs are thoughtful—fall in love with eco-friendly pieces such as timeless ponchos by Re:creation Designs (pictured), crafted from end-of-roll designer fabrics and accented with scrap-leather details. It’s limited-edition fashion at its finest.

Scenic Serenity at Scandinave Spa

By JILL VON SPRECKEN
Dec. 2017

Scandinave Spa takes hydrotherapy to new heights. (Photo: Joern Rohde)

Maybe it’s the Nordic-style baths or the forested surroundings, but a trip to Scandinave Spa is truly transportive. The spa-goers’ mantra here: sweat, shiver, repeat. First, raise your temperature in a eucalyptus steam room, dry sauna or outdoor saltwater pool. Then, make a splash in a cold plunge pool to flush toxins and release endorphins. The final step is spent in a tranquil relaxation room or by an outdoor fireplace, before repeating the ahhhh-inspiring process again—and again. Additional indulgences include massage treatments and bites at the on-site cafe. It’s the kind of place where you’ll want to soak and stay awhile.

BC-made Gifts at the Audain Art Museum Shop

By SHERI RADFORD

A beautiful selection of gifts and souvenirs made in BC. (Photo: Darby Magill)

Let’s face it: no one enjoys receiving a tacky trinket as a souvenir of your trip to Whistler. Up your gift-giving game by visiting the Audain Art Museum Shop. This carefully curated boutique features exquisite jewellery, puzzles, books and sculptures, all made by BC artists and artisans. Souvenir shopping doesn’t get any simpler than this.

All-Out Alpine Adventures

Explore the mountains by dogsled, zipline and more

By CHLOË LAI

Ice cave tours reveal the beauty beneath the ice cap. (Photo: Head-Line Mountain Holidays)

When it comes to winter, Whistler isn’t just a wonderland—it’s a veritable outdoor playground. Ever dream of carving your name into the side of a mountain? With ski and snowboard runs up to 11 km (7 mi) long, there’s plenty of room to leave your mark. If perfectly groomed trails just won’t cut it, venture off the beaten path by way of private catski or helicopter to find spectacular glacier runs stacked with pristine powder. Looking for other ways to test the theory of gravity? Take a deep breath and bungee jump off a bridge over the glacial Cheakamus River, or hurtle gleefully down the hill at the Coca-Cola Tube Park. Motorheads also love revving up a snowmobile—miniature versions are available for pint-sized adrenaline junkies—to roar through frozen backcountry trails. There’s no age limit for squeal-at-the-top-of-your-lungs fun. Read more…

Canuck Clothing

By SHERI RADFORD

Channel your inner Canadian with patriotic pieces from Roots.

Channel your inner Canadian with patriotic pieces from Roots.

Whether you’re a Canadian or you just want to dress like one, Roots has something for you. Founded in 1973 in Ontario, the company is virtually synonymous with the True North Strong and Free. Especially popular this year is the Cooper Canada Kanga Hoody (pictured), part of the Canada 150 collection that celebrates the country’s sesquicentennial. Consider it Canadian camouflage: slip one on, grab a hockey stick and a beer, and you’ll blend right in, eh.

Timeless Treasures

By CHLOË LAI

Striking and environmentally conscientious jewellery makes a great souvenir.

Striking and environmentally conscientious jewellery makes a perfect souvenir.

Bring home a piece of the Pacific Northwest with Jodi Stark’s elegant jewellery, made from reclaimed wood. Treasures salvaged from beaches and scrap piles are given new life as one-of-a-kind wearable art that celebrates the natural beauty of the West Coast. Accentuated with sterling silver details and strung from delicate chains, these reclaimed maple, black walnut, arbutus and cherry wood pieces are as timeless and unique as the memories you’ll make during your visit. Find yours at the Audain Art Museum or online at www.jodistark.ca.

Eco-friendly Tips for Tourists

By CHLOË LAI

Enjoy the best of Whistler by bike. (Photo: Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler)

Enjoy the best of Whistler by bike. (Photo: Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler)

Countless travellers have fallen for Whistler’s natural good looks—here are some ways to keep it lush by making your visit environmentally friendly: Make the most of that fresh mountain air by walking or cycling everywhere. Check bin labels to see whether items are compostable or recyclable before putting them in the trash. Carry reusable water bottles and shopping bags so you can sip glacier-fed tap water while loading up on locally designed souvenirs. And come back soon, because visitors like you are part of what makes Whistler beautiful.

Art: Whimsical World

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

"The Wind and the Water", by Dana Irving.

“The Wind and the Water”, by Dana Irving.

The wild West Coast gets a dash of whimsy in the hands of landscape artist Dana Irving. The artist’s playful, minimalist world has been described as a blend of Emily Carr and Dr. Seuss, and includes works such as “The Wind and the Water” (pictured). Irving captures the Pacific Northwest’s towering peaks and treetops—and everything in-between—in bold, stylized pieces that celebrate a spiritual connection with nature. Explore her great outdoors at Adele Campbell Fine Art Gallery.

On a High Note

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

The Treetop Adventure Course is not your average walk in the woods.

The Treetop Adventure Course is not your average walk in the woods.

Trekking through the treetops isn’t just for Tarzan anymore. Now, regular Joes and Janes can have a ball in the branches as they swing, scamper, climb and zip through 70 different aerial obstacles, some as high as 18 m (60 ft). Even little canopy climbers can test their balance on the kids’ course. Learn the ropes—and maybe even thump your chest a little—on the Treetop Adventure Course.

Take a Hike

By SHERI RADFORD

Spectacular scenery awaits you in Whistler, BC. (Photo: Mitch Winton/Coast Mountain Photography and Whistler Blackcomb)

Spectacular scenery awaits you in Whistler, BC. (Photo: Mitch Winton/Coast Mountain Photography and Whistler Blackcomb)

Whether you’re a rambling rambler or a hard-core hiker or somewhere in-between, you’ll find the right route here. The 40-km (25-mi) Valley Trail, which is paved but non-motorized, connects all of Whistler’s parks, lakes and neighbourhoods, from Cheakamus River to Creekside to Green Lake. The trails around Lost Lake are ideal for a leisurely stroll, even with a baby stroller in tow. Seeking more adventure? Head for the hills—Whistler and Blackcomb mountains, that is, where the lift-accessed alpine hiking trails range from the easy Whistler Summit Interpretive Walk to the advanced Alpine Walk to Overlord Trail to Decker Loop on Blackcomb. Lace up those hiking boots and get moving.