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Toronto

10 Toronto Steak Houses That Sizzle

The Shore Club

Everything from traditional favourites to new takes on the classic steak dinner

The Shore Club
The Shore Club is located in the heart of the Entertainment District, close to venues like Roy Thomson Hall and the TIFF Bell Lightbox. Along with classic cuts like New York strip loin, bone-in rib steak and filet mignon, you’ll find a steak and lobster dish, braised short ribs and double-cut lamb chops.
155 Wellington St. W.

Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse
Ruth Fertel, founder of this international chain, credited the success of her steaks as much to their sound and smell as to their taste. That’s why steaks here are cooked at nearly 1,000 degrees Celsius, served on an incredibly hot plate and doused with a tablespoon of sizzle-inducing butter before they leave the kitchen.
145 Richmond St. W.

Morton’s
This Texas-based steakhouse chain has a modern ambiance but still delivers a proper old-school steak—not to mention an impressive number of side dishes, including sautéed broccoli florets, creamed corn, bacon and onion macaroni and cheese, and parmesan and truffle matchstick fries.
4 Avenue Rd.

STK

STK
Mix the vibe of a modern restaurant with that of an exclusive nightclub—there’s even a live DJ—and you’ve got the STK experience. Along with dry-aged steaks, this restaurant offers some unique drink concoctions, with names like Cucumber Stiletto, Carroted Away and Strawberry Cobbler.
153 Yorkville Ave.

Harbour 60
Don’t be surprised to see a Toronto Maple Leaf or two dining here, considering the restaurant is only seconds from the Air Canada Centre, located in the century-old Habour Commission building. The restuarant offers classic fare and has a seafood menu to rival its steaks, with beluga caviar, a daily selection of fresh oysters and a seafood tower, including steamed lobster, king crab legs, jumbo black tiger shrimp and oysters.
60 Harbour St.

Barberian’s Steak House
Founded in 1959, this is one of the oldest steakhouses in Toronto. Sitting in the dinning room, you get the impression little has changed since it first opened its doors. One thing that definitely hasn’t changed is the attention to detail Barberian’s gives to preparing its steaks, which are all butchered and aged in-house. Be sure to ask for a tour of the must-be-seen-to-be-believed wine cellar.
7 Elm St.

Hy’s Steakhouse

Hy’s Steakhouse
Dark mahogany furniture, rich carpets and intimate lighting complement the high-quality, 28-day-aged Canadian beef on the menu here. The Steak Neptune—New York strip loin or filet mignon topped with asparagus, Dungeness crabmeat and hollandaise sauce—is just one of the house specialties.
120 Adelaide St. W.

BlueBloods Steakhouse
One of the city’s most noted tourist attractions is now home to this upscale eatery. Antique furniture mixes with modern art in the billiard room of Casa Loma—a circa 1900 gothic-revival-style mansion—where the Liberty Entertainment Group recently invested $3 million to create a steakhouse featuring cuts of beef sourced from around the world, plus a drink list of international wines and spirits.
1 Austin Ter.

La Castile
Eat like royalty in a three-tiered, castle-inspired dining room, complete with stained-glass windows and chandeliers suspended from cathedral ceilings. Start your meal with flash-fried calamari, escargots or a plate of Caspian Sea caviar before cutting into a char-broiled USDA prime steak, served with mushrooms or steamed spinach.
2179 Dundas St. E., Mississauga

Quinn’s Steakhouse & Irish Bar
Located in the Financial District’s Sheraton Centre Hotel, Quinn’s is a family-owned-and-operated steakhouse with an Irish flare. Not in the mood for their aged Alberta beef steak or slow-roasted prime rib? Try the Irish stew or Clare Island salmon. Whatever you settle on, make sure to relax afterward with a glass of one of the 240 whiskeys on offer.
96 Richmond St. W.

Things to do in Toronto This January

The Lorax

Next Stage Theatre Festival
Jan. 3–14
Next Stage is the winter cousin of the Toronto Fringe Festival. But where the Fringe is made up of both established and up-and-coming theatre artists chosen by lottery, Next Stage is a juried affair and consists of both new and remounted plays from past festivals. This year’s highlights include a new work by comedy troupe–puppeteers Sex T-Rex and Fringe vets Martin Dockery and Vanessa Quesnelle.
Factory Theatre, 125 Bathurst St.

The Canadian Odyssey of Lord Milton
To Jan. 7
In 1862, English nobleman Viscount Milton and physician Walter Cheadle travelled across Canada, looking for a direct route to the Cariboo goldfield in British Columbia. The story of their trip was detailed in a book, illustrated by Cheadle, called The North-West Passage By Land. Visitors to the Gardiner Museum can view 13 pieces from both public and private collections of a commemorative tea set featuring hand-painted art inspired by the book’s drawings.
Gardiner Museum, 111 Queen’s Park

Monster Jam
Jan. 13 and 14
In terms of pure spectacle, a monster truck rally is already the automotive equivalent of professional wrestling. Monster Jam likes to take that combination of raw energy and technical expertise and turn it up a notch. The custom-designed trucks that compete for the Toronto Monster Jam championship at the Rogers Centre are an impressive 12 feet tall and 12 feet wide. They sit on 66-inch tires, weigh 10,000 pounds at minimum, and can drive off a ramp and land up to 130 feet away or bounce 35 feet into the air.
Rogers Centre, 1 Blue Jays Way

Toronto Light Fest

Toronto Light Fest
Starts Jan. 19
The Toronto Light Fest aims to combat winter’s dark days by illuminating at least one small pocket of the city. Spanning three months, the festival transforms the historic Distillery District into one of the largest open-air art galleries in the world, thanks to an estimated 750,000 artistically placed lights. The Distillery’s dozens of Victorian-era buildings are surrounded by—and incorporated into—a wide range of sculptures, light canopies and installations created by both local and international light artists.
Distillery District, 55 Mill St.

Arts of the East: Highlights of Islamic Art from the Bruschettini Collection
To Jan. 21
Lavish textiles, patterned carpets, paintings and inlaid metalwork from the 13th to 17th centuries are on display at the Aga Khan Museum in this debut exhibition of one of the most important private collections of Islamic art in the world.
Aga Khan Museum, 77 Wynford Dr.

The Lorax
To Jan. 21
Few people realize beloved children’s author Dr. Seuss was an early supporter of the environmental movement. His 1971 book The Lorax directly addressed threats to nature poised by economic greed. This stage adaptation educates as much as it entertains—courtesy of a set design that will make you feel like you’re living in a Dr. Seuss book.
Royal Alexandra Theatre, 260 King St. W.

Winterlicious
Starts Jan. 26
This citywide celebration of culinary excellence encompasses more than 200 restaurants, each with their own prix-fixe menus for lunch and dinner. This year’s participants include Bar Buca, Canoe, Colette Grand Café, and The Carbon Bar among others. Spots fill up fast at so make sure to make reservations ahead of time.
Various locations

Christian Dior at the ROM

Christian Dior
To March 18
Christian Dior was one of the most influential fashion designers of the 20th century, known for his use of luxury textiles and gorgeous embroideries. To celebrate the 70th anniversary of the House of Dior, the Royal Ontario Museum displays items from its rarely seen collection of haute couture pieces designed by Dior from 1947 to 1957.
Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen’s Park

15 Things To Do in Toronto This December

This festive month is filled with a mixture of holiday merriment and family-friendly activities.

New Year’s Eve at Nathan Phillips Square. Photo courtesy of the City of Toronto.

12 Trees: Let There Be Light at The Gardiner Museum
To Jan. 7
A tradition since 1990, this year’s edition is co-curated by author and visual artist Douglas Coupland and focuses on light as a symbol of hope. Evan Biddell, Vivian Wong, Julia White, Alex McLeod, Connor Crawford, Christine Dewancker and Katherine Strang are among the contributing artists who have designed themed trees. This year’s creations include an animated winter dreamscape and a disco-ball tree.
Gardiner Museum, 111 Queen’s Park

Home Alone in Concert
Dec. 1-2
The Toronto Symphony Orchestra, joined by the Etobicoke School of the Arts Junior Chorus, performs John Williams score from the 1990 smash hit during a live screening of the movie. The hit comedic film sees Macaulay Culkin as Kevin McCallister take on two bumbling burglars by himself (played by Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern) when his family accidentally leaves for a trip without him.
Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.

St. Michael’s Choir School Annual Christmas Concert
Dec. 2-3
The angelic voices of the St. Michael’s Choir School, which celebrates its 80th anniversary this year, perform both secular and sacred carols to herald the Christmas season, including “O Come All Ye Faithful,” “Hallelujah,” and Handel’s “Messiah Part I.”
Massey Hall, 178 Victoria St.

150 Years of Canadian Christmas at Casa Loma
Dec. 2-Jan. 7
The city’s palatial castle celebrates the season with a 40-foot tree designed by Canadian icon Jeanne Beker, along with eight other trees throughout the estate. Live entertainment features illusionist Professor Wick and ice skating performers Glisse on Ice. Kids can seek out Santa Claus at his castle workshop, decorate edible treats, and partake in arts and crafts.
1 Austin Terr.

A Christmas Carol. Photo by Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

A Christmas Carol
Dec. 7-24
Bah-humbug! Miserly Ebenezer Scrooge discovers his heart and the holiday spirit after visits from the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future in this adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic presented by Soulpepper Theatre Company.
Young Centre for the Performing Arts, 50 Tank House Lane

Peter Pan
Dec. 8-31
Escape to Neverland with J.M. Barrie’s iconic character, Peter Pan. The boy who never grows up encounters an assortment of colourful characters including pirates, fairies, crocodiles, and even ordinary children like the Darling siblings. This musical rendition by Soulpepper Theatre Company is sure to capture the imagination of the entire family.
Young Centre for the Performing Arts, 50 Tank House Lane

The Nutcracker
Dec. 9-30
A true holiday classic featuring the Sugar Plum Fairy, dancing bears, and cannon dolls, is masterfully choreographed by James Kudelka and set to music by Tchaikovsky. The National Ballet of Canada transforms E.T.A. Hoffman’s traditional tale with enchanting dance numbers, elaborate costumes, and lavish sets.
Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W.

The Lorax. Photo by Manuel Harlan.

Dr. Seuss’s The Lorax
Dec. 9-Jan. 21
The North American premiere of this Dr. Seuss fable about protecting the environment gets the stage treatment. Direct from London and adapted by David Greig, Dr. Seuss’s colourful world is reflected with bold sets and costumes, puppets, and an original score by Charlie Fink.
Royal Alexandra Theatre, 260 King St. W.

The Illusionists
Dec. 12-Jan. 7
Marvel as seven world-class magicians perform dazzling displays of wizardy and more right before your eyes. Back by popular demand—last year’s shows sold out—new performers are part of this year’s line up, including Darcy Oake, a.k.a. The Grand Illusionist, who performs death-defying acts, while Raymond Crowe, a.k.a. The Unusualist, is a mime and ventriloquist, and An Ha Lim, a.k.a. The Manipulator, mesmerizes audiences with card tricks.
Princess of Wales Theatre, 300 King St. W.

Dance Me/Music of Leonard Cohen
Dec. 15
This Toronto premiere by Ballets Jazz Montréal (BJM) pays tribute to beloved Canadian singer, songwriter, and poet Leonard Cohen. This contemporary dance company, known for its expressive style and accessibility, selects music from the span of Cohen’s lengthy career.
Sony Centre for the Performing Arts, 1 Front St. E.

DJ Skate Nights on the Natrel Rink
Dec. 16-Feb. 17
Head down to the waterfront for a scenic twirl on the rink at Harbourfront Centre. DJs spin tunes every Saturday night, with hot beverage and bites available from the rinkside restaurant, Boxcar Social.
Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens Quay W.

Sing-Along Messiah
Dec. 17
Become part of the choir at this interactive show led by conductor “Herr Handel” as thousands of voices sing Handel’s beloved Hallelujah chorus. The Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Chamber Choir, along with featured soloists Joanne Lunn, James Laing, Rufus Müller, and Brett Polegato, take part in this family-friendly concert.
Massey Hall, 178 Victoria St.

Disney on Ice

Disney on Ice Presents Reach for the Stars
Dec. 22-Jan. 1
Beloved friends from the Disney Kingdom, including Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck and Goofy, join a royal cast that includes Anna and Elsa (and their snowy sidekick, Olaf), Ariel, Rapunzel, and Belle for a musical skating spectacle. Sing along to such songs as “Be Our Guest,” “Let It Go,” and “Tale as Old as Time.”
Rogers Centre, 1 Blue Jays Way

Toronto Christmas Market
To Dec. 23
Inspired by traditional European Christmas markets—and named one of the world’s best by Fodor’s Travel—the magic of the season is on dazzling display at the pedestrian-friendly Distillery District. Good boys and girls can have a photo op with Santa, visit a life-sized gingerbread house, and take a spin on a carousel or a ferris wheel. Grown ups can head to one of several heated lounges and beer gardens throughout the venue and partake in craft beers, mulled wines, European cocktails, and hot toddies.
Distillery District, 55 Mill St.

New Year’s Eve at Nathan Phillips Square
Dec. 31
Bid farewell to 2017 and ring in the new year at the city’s central gathering spot, Nathan Phillips Square. Festivities begin at 8 p.m. (get there earlier to secure a good spot), featuring live performances, a DJ skating party, and an impressive fireworks display to cap off TO Canada with Love, a year-long celebration of Canada’s sesquicentennial.
Nathan Phillips Square, 100 Queen St. W.

Toronto’s Top 6 Sneakers

Elevate Your Street Style with some of the Coolest Sneakers in the City

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heel Boy

Find your next pair of stylish kicks at this hip boutique. Browse its diverse selection of footwear—from the funky to the sensible—and mixture of mid-range to high-end brands. 773 Queen St. W.; 53 Gristmill Ln., Adidas Gazelle trainer, $100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Browns

Outfit yourself at this Montreal-based purveyor of shoes for both adults and children. Here you’ll find everything from thigh-high boots by Strategia to alligator-clad sneakers from Lacoste. 110 Bloor St. W.; other locations,  Lacoste Eyyla 317 1, $200

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ecco

Outfit yourself like a Scandinavian with a selection of comfortable boots, shoes, sandals and accessories in classic styles from this Danish company. CF Toronto Eaton Centre, 220 Yonge St.; other locations,  Soft 1 high-top, $160

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Davids

Canada’s largest independent luxury shoe store features such labels as Manolo Blahnik, Swims and Hugo  Boss. 66 Bloor St. W.; other locations, Swims motion mid-cut, $220

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ron White

Along with Ron’s All Day Heels and signature collections, this shop stocks names like Frye, Cole Haan and Mephisto. Manulife Centre,
55 Bloor St. W.; other locations, Stella floral dark jeans multi, $445

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want Apothecary

Browse the selection of carefully curated footwear from Want Les Essentiels, as well as other well-known and emerging designers. Want Apothecary also carries clothing, beauty products and accessories. 1070 Yonge St.; 2579 Yonge St., Lalibela sneaker, $275

2017 Holiday Gift Guide for Kids

Explore Toronto’s fantastic shopping scene to find gifts for friends, family and anyone else on your list.

Raccoon hand puppet ($61.95)
ShopAGO, Art Gallery
of Ontario, 317 Dundas St. W., shop2.ago.net

View a slideshow of great toys and adorable gift ideas:

Toronto’s Best Christmas Market

Eat, drink and be merry at the Distillery District’s holiday bazaar

Bundle up and walk the cobblestone streets of the historic Distillery District during the most magical time of year. From Nov. 16 to Dec. 23, the Toronto Christmas Market offers shoppers a chance to browse local handicrafts and sample hearty fare like poutine and schnitzel. You can also sip mulled wine under one of the city’s largest real Christmas trees, as carollers, brass bands and choirs fill the air with holiday cheer. If the weather gets chilly, you can always warm up in one of the cosy nearby boutiques, restaurants or bars.

2017 Warm & Cosy Holiday Gift Guide

Explore Toronto’s fantastic shopping scene to find gifts for friends, family and anyone else on your list.

Wolf-pompom knit toque ($99)
Simons, Square One Shopping Centre, 100 City Centre Dr.,
Mississauga, m.simons.ca

View a slideshow of great clothing items and other cozy gift ideas:

A Perfect Fall Day in Toronto

Enjoy the most colourful season with these five family friendly activities

9:00 a.m. Find fresh vegetables, preserves, baked goods and more at one of the city’s farmer’s markets, including the Evergreen Brick Works (550 Bayview Ave.), Dufferin Grove (875 Dufferin Park Ave.), Sorauren Park (289 Sorauren Ave.), and St. Lawrence Market (93 Front St. E.).

11:00 a.m. Go apple picking, navigate an eight-acre corn maze and watch pumpkins get shot out of a cannon on a visit to Pingle’s Farm Market. 1805 Taunton Rd. E., Hampton, ON.

5:00 p.m. Stop into Kalendar for a late after-noon break. The Little Italy institution offers a number of warming seasonal drinks, including mulled wine and cider. 546 College St.

3:00 p.m. Take in the fall colours with a hike along the West Humber River Valley, the East Don Parkland, E.T. Seton Park, Scarborough’s Cudia Park, or Etobicoke’s Rouge Valley.

7:00 p.m. There’s no better season for classic Canadian comfort food than autumn. Drop by Bannock for a fish and shrimp cake,
cod chowder or spinach greens mac and cheese. 401 Bay St.

2017 Food and Drink Holiday Gift Guide

Explore Toronto’s fantastic shopping scene to find gifts for friends, family and anyone else on your list.

Nuremberg-style Lebkuchen cookies ($24 and up)
Pusateri’s Fine Foods, 57 Yorkville Ave.; other locations, pusateris.com

Click below to view a slideshow of great food and drink gift ideas:

17 Things To Do in Toronto This November

Grease: The Musical

Grease: The Musical
Nov. 1–Dec. 10
Fans of the John Travolta–Olivia Newton-John film know the subtitle of this production is redundant. What’s Grease without its signature songs like “You’re the One That I Want” and “Greased Lightning”? This new performance takes its characters back to the Chicago setting of the original 1971 musical, but otherwise it’s the same story you grew up with. Grease is still the word.
Winter Garden Theatre, 189 Yonge St.

Joachim Bandau
Nov. 2–25
German artist Bandau has exhibited work in more than 45 museum collections throughout his half-century career. His works in wood, metal and watercolour have had an uninterrupted run during that time, always on display in at least one major showing. The Nicholas Metivier Gallery brings a selection of his paintings and sculptures to Toronto this fall.
Nicholas Metivier Gallery, 451 King St. W.

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair
Nov. 3-12
The largest indoor agricultural fair in the world visits Toronto every November, bringing with it giant vegetables, pet-able farm animals, performing dogs and one of the most renowned international equestrian competitions anywhere. While you’re there, don’t forget to take in the butter sculptures, relax with a session of goat yoga or enjoy an evening of wine tasting.
Exhibition Place

Taste of Iceland
Nov. 9 to 12
Experience Icelandic food and culture at the seventh annual Taste of Iceland Festival. Try traditional Icelandic favourites like langoustine, arctic char, fried lamb fillet and skyr with a special tasting menu at Leña, and attend a concert, literary event and concert, all in celebration of the island’s vibrant cultural scene.
Various venues

Hockey Hall of Fame Induction Weekend
Nov. 10–13
Dave Andreychuk, Clare Drake, Jeremy Jacobs, Danielle Goyette, Paul Kariya, Mark Recchi and Teemu Selanne will all be welcomed into the Hockey Hall of Fame at this year’s annual weekend of festivities. Along with special guest appearances, Q&A fan forums and autograph signings, Sunday afternoon’s Legends Classic will feature a star-studded lineup. Cheer on your favourite hockey hero at the Air Canada Centre, as teams lead by Mark Messier and Jari Kurri face off against each other.
Various venues

Chris Rock
Nov. 11
It’s hard to believe the Total Blackout Tour is Chris Rock’s first time on the road in nine years. The comedian has received rave reviews to date, with an act focusing on Rock’s strengths: making jokes about race relations, politics, and relationships—in particular the dissolution of his marriage in 2014.
Air Canada Centre, 40 Bay St.

Gourmet Food and Wine Expo
Nov. 16–19
Each year, more than 45,000
visitors attend the Gourmet Food & Wine Expo for epicurean
eats and a selection of more than 1,500 wines, beers, and spirits. Among the purveyors at the 23rd edition are exhibitors such as Cannoli Queens, Stonetown Artisan Cheese and Barilla Pasta. Thirsty guests can visit the Spiritology Pavilion for a tipple, or join a Tutored Tasting seminar to learn about fine wines and spirits from the experts. Live programming continues at the Chef Stage, which hosts demonstrations from an all-star line-up, including celebrity chef Emily Richards.
Metro Toronto Convention Centre, 255 Front St. W.

Santa Claus Parade
Nov. 19
The Santa Claus Parade has been an annual Toronto tradition since 1905. Kids of all ages line the streets along Santa’s route to catch a glimpse of upside-down clowns, marching bands, and, of course, the man in red himself. The parade starts at 12:30 p.m. at Christie Pits Park and works its way along Bloor Street, down Avenue Road, and across Wellington Street to the St. Lawrence Market. Some years are colder than others, so dress warmly, and bring a Thermos of something hot to drink.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time
To Nov. 19
Christopher Boone—the lead character in Simon Stephens’s stage adaptation of Mark Hadden’s popular novel—is a highly intelligent 15-year-old boy who’s gifted at math but who has trouble making sense of everyday life. When he becomes a suspect in the death of a neighbour’s dog, he begins an investigation to find the real culprit.
Princess of Wales Theatre, 300 King St. W.

One of a Kind Show & Sale
Nov. 23–Dec. 3
Find gifts and inspiration at the One of a Kind Show & Sale, a juried event that celebrates all things crafted and handmade. Held twice annually, the winter edition features more than 500 designers and artisans, with a variety of merchandise ranging from jewellery to preserves to ceramics. Visitors can browse vendor tables, hear talks at the main stage and learn about the crafts and techniques from the makers themselves.
Enercare Centre, Exhibition Place

A Christmas Carol: The Family Musical with a Scrooge Loose

A Christmas Carol: The Family Musical with a Scrooge Loose
Nov. 24–Dec. 31
Ross Petty Productions has been staging family friendly Christmas pantomimes (musical comedies loosely based on a traditional fairy tales that employ slapstick, cross-dressing and topically based jokes) for 22 years, and yet this year’s edition is the first to actually have a Christmas theme, taking on the Dickens classic A Christmas Carol. Not that it matters: if you’re paying too close attention to the plot of a pantomime, you’re missing all the fun.
Elgin Theatre, 189 Yonge St.

Cavalcade of Lights
Nov. 25
Celebrate the start of the holiday season with thousands of other revellers at the 49th annual Cavalcade of Lights. Watch as the city’s official Christmas tree is illuminated with more than 525,000 lights, and enjoy the energetic live performances, skating parties and impressive fireworks. Even if you miss the big event, you can still view the lit-up tree each night throughout the holiday season.
Nathan Phillips Square, 100 Queen St. W.

Christian Dior at the Royal Ontario Museum

Christian Dior
Opens Nov. 25
Christian Dior was one of the most influential fashion designers of the 20th century, known for his use of luxury textiles and gorgeous embroideries.
To celebrate the 70th anniversary of the House of Dior, the Royal Ontario Museum displays items from its rarely seen collection of haute couture pieces designed by Dior from 1947 to 1957.
Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen’s Park

The Faraway Nearby: Photographs of Canada from the New York Times Photo Archive
To Dec. 10
To mark the country’s sesquicentennial, the Ryerson Image Centre was gifted a vast trove of 25,000 Canada-centric photographs from the New York Times photo archive. This exhibit displays but a small number of them, highlighting images of major political events, beautiful landscapes, and portraits of notable Canadians.
Ryerson Image Centre, 33 Gould St.

Bat Out of Hell
To Dec. 24
Meat Loaf and Jim Steinman’s operatic 1977 album, Bat Out of Hell, meets its stage musical roots head on in this energetic post-apocalyptic extravaganza. Set in dystopian Manhattan, the show follows a young man named Strat who falls in love with Raven, the daughter of a powerful tyrant. Rock out to Meat Loaf’s greatest hits, like “Paradise by the Dashboard Light,” “I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That)” and “Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad.”
Ed Mirvish Theatre,244 Victoria St.

The Canadian Odyssey of Lord Milton
To Jan. 7
In 1862, English nobleman Viscount Milton and physician Walter Cheadle travelled across Canada, looking for a direct route to the Cariboo goldfield in British Columbia. The story of their trip was detailed in a book, illustrated by Cheadle, called The North-West Passage By Land. This fall, visitors to the Gardiner Museum can view 13 pieces, from both public and private collections, of a commemorative tea set featuring hand-painted art inspired by the book’s drawings.
Gardiner Museum, 111 Queen’s Park

Arts of the East: Highlights of Islamic Art from the Bruschettini Collection
To Jan. 21
Lavish textiles, patterned carpets, paintings and inlaid metalwork from the 13th to 17th centuries are on display at the Aga Khan in this debut exhibition of one of the most important private collections of Islamic art in the world.
Aga Khan Museum, 77 Wynford Dr.

Kitchen Q & A: Chef Nuit Regular

The chef of Pai Northern Thai Kitchen shows off the diversity of Thailand’s cuisine at her newest restaurant, Kiin

Why open another restaurant after Pai’s success?

I wanted to introduce styles of Thai food that people in Toronto had yet to try, and to offer a variety of foods from across Thailand. There are southern dishes, dishes from the northeast, royal Thai cuisine and many others.

What’s your favourite dish to make at Kiin?

Right now it’s wing bean salad. It’s a dish that I make with tom yum paste: a chilli paste that I make from scratch. I went back to Thailand to eat lots of wing bean salads, to learn, and then I came back and made this dish.

What’s an ingredient unique to Kiin?

We use buffalo Thai basil. My mom used to cook with it when she made food like Kua Hang Gai for me and the neighbours. I tried to get the basil in Toronto, but no one sold it here, so I had to search for a supplier and order it in from Thailand.

Kiin is located at 326 Adelaide St. W., kiintoronto.com.

Four Must-see Art and Museum Exhibits for Fall

From imaginative monsters to Nazi history to indigenous art to crafted textiles, there’s a wealth of exhibits to experience this season

Delve into the collection of imaginative items at Guillermo del Toro: At Home with Monsters.

 

Raise a Flag: Works from
the Indigenous Art Collection (2000–2015)

To Dec. 10

OCAD University, Canada’s largest art and design school, christens its new 8,000-foot flagship galley in September with an exhibit that creates a dialogue surrounding Canada’s national identity. Works by more than two dozen First Nations, Inuit and Métis artists will be on display from Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s comprehensive art collection.

Onsite Gallery, 199 Richmond St. W., ocadu.ca

 

Guillermo del Toro: At Home with Monsters

To Jan. 7

Few modern filmmakers have made their stamp on the fantasy genre like Guillermo del Toro. This fall, the Art Gallery of Ontario exhibits a selection of items from del Toro’s famous personal collection of curiosities, including art, books and ephemera surrounding the afterlife, magic, occultism, alchemy, freaks and imaginary creatures. This show provides a window into the creative process of the mind behind Pan’s Labyrinth, Pacific Rim and The Hobbit.

Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas St. W.

 

The Evidence Room

To Jan. 28

In 2000, architectural historian Robert Jan van Pelt proved in a landmark court case that Auschwitz was purposefully designed by the Nazis as a death camp. His research became a source for the emerging discipline of architectural forensics. The Evidence Room—an acclaimed exhibition when it debuted last year at the International Architecture Exhibition in Venice—displays key objects central to that research, including full-scale reconstructions of three major components of the Auschwitz gas chambers along with more than 60 plaster casts of additional architectural evidence.

Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen’s Park

 

Diligence and Elegance: The Nature of Japanese Textiles

To Jan. 21

This exhibit displays 19th- and 20th-century fabrics and garments from Kyoto’s professional weaving workshops alongside Canadian-made cotton, cloth and silk kimonos created using traditional techniques. The show features work by contemporary artists Hiroko Karuno and Keiko Shintani, both of whose work has evolved from Japanese textile traditions.

Textile Museum of Canada, 55 Centre Ave.