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Toronto

For Art’s Sake: Four must-see exhibits for fall

Delve into the collection of imaginative items at Guillermo del Toro: At Home with Monsters.

 

Raise a Flag: Works from
the Indigenous Art Collection (2000–2015)

To Dec. 10

OCAD University, Canada’s largest art and design school, christens its new 8,000-foot flagship galley in September with an exhibit that creates a dialogue surrounding Canada’s national identity. Works by more than two dozen First Nations, Inuit and Métis artists will be on display from Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s comprehensive art collection.

Onsite Gallery, 199 Richmond St. W., ocadu.ca

 

Guillermo del Toro: At Home with Monsters

To Jan. 7

Few modern filmmakers have made their stamp on the fantasy genre like Guillermo del Toro. This fall, the Art Gallery of Ontario exhibits a selection of items from del Toro’s famous personal collection of curiosities, including art, books and ephemera surrounding the afterlife, magic, occultism, alchemy, freaks and imaginary creatures. This show provides a window into the creative process of the mind behind Pan’s Labyrinth, Pacific Rim and The Hobbit.

Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas St. W.

 

The Evidence Room

To Jan. 28

In 2000, architectural historian Robert Jan van Pelt proved in a landmark court case that Auschwitz was purposefully designed by the Nazis as a death camp. His research became a source for the emerging discipline of architectural forensics. The Evidence Room—an acclaimed exhibition when it debuted last year at the International Architecture Exhibition in Venice—displays key objects central to that research, including full-scale reconstructions of three major components of the Auschwitz gas chambers along with more than 60 plaster casts of additional architectural evidence.

Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen’s Park

 

Diligence and Elegance: The Nature of Japanese Textiles

To Jan. 21

This exhibit displays 19th- and 20th-century fabrics and garments from Kyoto’s professional weaving workshops alongside Canadian-made cotton, cloth and silk kimonos created using traditional techniques. The show features work by contemporary artists Hiroko Karuno and Keiko Shintani, both of whose work has evolved from Japanese textile traditions.

Textile Museum of Canada, 55 Centre Ave.

Toronto’s Thin-Crust Craze

DEVOUR SOME OF THE BEST NEAPOLITAN PIZZA OUTSIDE OF ITALY

Terroni offers up a delicious menu of thin-crust creations. (Photo by Dylan + Jen.)

Queen Margherita

A strict Vera Pizza Napoletana adherence is why these traditional pies are a reliable favourite. Perfectly blistered crusts are topped with hearty certified San Marzano tomato sauce and fired in a Naples-made oven.
1402 Queen St. E.; 785 Annette St.; 772 Dundas St. W. 

Terroni

Terroni’s extensive list of ’zas embraces all the hallmarks of the southern Italian tradition. Your margherita or quattro stagioni arrives at the table as a whole pie, leaving you to decide the size of your slices.
720 Queen St. W.; 1095 Yonge St.; 57 Adelaide St. E.

Pizzeria Libretto

One of the first restaurants on Toronto’s thin-slice scene now includes five always-packed locations (and a takeout-only spot) across the city. Toppings such as Ontario prosciutto and duck confit are must-tries.
221 Ossington Ave.; 550 Danforth Ave.; 155 University Ave.; 545 King St. W.

Via Mercanti

Romolo Salvati’s mini pizza
empire adds a creative flair to its authentic flavours. For example, its signature Via Mercanti is a two-pizza-layered masterpiece—a ricotta, mushroom and spicy soppressata-covered pizza hides under a full margherita pie.
188 Augusta Ave.; 87 Elm St.; other locations

Lambretta Pizzeria

The signature dish at this family-friendly joint is the prosciutto-laden Lambretta pizza, with a crispy crust that cradles fior de latte, arugla and cherry tomatoes. Or, if meat-free is more your style, try the marinara, vegeteriana or funghi. 89 Roncesvalles Ave.

Toronto’s Best Breweries

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Photo by Carlo Mendoza.

Over the past few years, the city has seen an explosion of new microbreweries, each with their own speciality techniques. Here are some of the city’s best craft brewpubs, where you’ll find everything from classic ales and lagers to experimental sours and goses.

Indie Ale House

With creative brews, a cozy atmosphere and a fantastic menu this Junction alehouse has it all. The frequently rotating selection focuses on rare ales like Belgian sours, double IPAs and English porters, plus beers made using ancient brewing techniques. Once a month, Indie Ale House collaborates with a guest brewer to create experimental one-time-only beers. Grab a tasting flight to sample the range of ales and pair with a juicy short rib burger or the crispy southern fried chicken. 2876 Dundas St. W. 

Signature brews: Barnyard Instigator, Broken Hipster, Breakfast Porter

Henderson Brewing Co.

Henderson’s unassuming building, tucked into an industrial area south of Bloor Street near Lansdowne subway station, is easy to miss if you don’t know where to look. This award-winning brewery houses some of the best suds in town, created using brewing techniques inspired by those used in Toronto at the beginning of the 19th century. Each beer has a Toronto theme, drawing inspiration from the city’s past and present. The featured July beer, for example, showcases work on its label by Kaley Flowers, an award-winning artist from last years’ Toronto Outdoor Art Exhibition. Stay for a pint and get a close-up view of the brewing process, or take home some bottles or growler. 128A Sterling Rd.

Signature brews: Food Truck Blonde, Henderson’s Best,
Union Pearson Ale

Bandit Brewery

This microbrewery on Dundas Street West used to be an auto body shop. The former garage now houses brew tanks and its parking lot is a bustling patio filled with communal tables. Bandit has the atmosphere of a friendly German beer garden, with a uniquely Toronto twist: it features a mural and glasswear bearing the image of our unofficial municipal animal, the “trash panda,” or raccoon. Beers range from sour goses to hoppy IPAs to smooth lagers, and the menu includes delicious bar snacks like ale-battered cheese curds. 2125 Dundas St. W. 

Signature brews: Cone Ranger, Hoppleganger, Dundas West Coast IPA

Left Field Brewery

Both sports and beer fans will enjoy this baseball-themed brewery in Leslieville. In just a few years, husband and wife team Mark and Mandie have gone from sharing tank time with other breweries to opening their own space and widely distributing their brews to restaurants across the city. Left Field’s dog and kid-friendly location is decorated with baseball paraphernalia, like a salvaged scoreboard from Ohio that displays the business’s hours. There’s also a bottle shop where you can pick up favourites like Day Game session IPA, Cannonball Helles lager and Maris pale ale. 36 Wagstaff Dr.

Signature brews: Eephus, Sunlight Park, Wrigley

Burdock

Burdock, a combination bottle shop, restaurant and music hall, is one of the most innovative breweries in the city, trying out diverse styles of beer on a regular basis. Its brewers cite the wine world as a source of inspiration, and draw ingredients from a variety of producers, such as Niagara farmers and foragers and Ontario hop growers and wineries. The brewer began a barrel program in 2016, and it’s now starting to release some of its aged creations. The kitchen’s claim to fame is its sourdough bread, although there’s a lot more range to the menu, including a delicious selection of Ontario cheese. 1184 Bloor St. W.

Signature brews: The selection is constantly rotating, but the West Coast Pilsner is often on tap

Bellwoods Brewery

Bellwoods Brewery, a landmark brewery and bottle shop on the hip Ossington strip, is extremely popular, especially on sunny days when the patio comes alive. The rotating selection of pours range from aromatic pale ales to double IPAs to imperial stouts to farmhouse ales, and the special-edition bottled brews (including barrel-aged releases) means that there’s always something new to try. The small-but-tasty menu includes beer-friendly pairings like duck meatballs and smoked bratwurst. 124 Ossington Ave.

Signature brews: Jelly King, Roman Candle, Jutsu

Amsterdam BrewHouse

This waterfront drinking destination features 800 seats– 300 are located on one of four patios perfect for catching the lakeside breeze. The on-site craft brewery produces Amsterdam classics, as well as seasonal and small-batch releases from the Amsterdam Adventure Brews series, some of which have been barrel aged for more complex flavours. The comprehensive menu, which also suggests beer parings, features pub fare like the 3 Speed lager-battered fish and chips. 245 Queens Quay W.

Signature brews: 416 Local, Big Wheel, Boneshaker

Mill Street Brew Pub, Beer Hall and Brewery

The original Mill Street pub offers cold pints of the brewery’s most popular drafts, as well as small batch and seasonal offerings, like the refreshing ginger beer. Kick back with a pint and a bite to eat, or catch a guided tour to learn about the brewing process. Just around the corner, the newly renovated Mill Street Beer Hall features additional space and menu items for hungry and thirsty Distillery District visitors. A new on-site nano-brewery produces innovative and experimental, super-small-batch brews (some just a few barrels’ worth). 21 Tank House Ln. 

Signature brews: Original Organic Lager, Tankhouse Ale, 100th Meridian

The Season’s Hottest Shows

THE TOP SUMMER MOVIES, THEATRE, MUSIC AND DANCE

Shakespeare

The audience enjoys an actor’s performance in the heart of High Park.

Shakespeare in High Park

To Sept. 3

Canadian Stage marks 35 years of outdoor Shakespeare
performances in High Park in 2017. This year, King Lear, the Bard’s famous tale of a mad ruler’s downfall, will alternate evenings with Twelfth Night (or What You Will), a comedy of mistaken identity and gender. Whichever performance you choose, get there early to snag a good seat. High Park Amphitheatre, 1873 Bloor St. W., canadianstage.com

Beautiful: The Carole
King Musical

To Sept. 3

Be inspired by the story of Carole King, one of the most successful songwriters and solo acts in pop music history. Follow King’s rise to stardom, from her time writing with ex-husband Gerry Goffin to the launch of her solo career. Along the way, enjoy hits like “One Fine Day,” “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” and the title song, “Beautiful.”
Ed Mirvish Theatre, 244 Victoria St., mirvish.com

Billy Bishop Goes to War

July 1–Aug. 5

The Soulpepper theatre company
presents one of the most critically acclaimed and widely produced Canadian musicals of all time, Billy Bishop Goes to War. The production, written by John MacLachlan Gray and Eric Peterson, tells the story of Billy Bishop, a First World War fighter pilot, though a series of anecdotes examining his high-flying exploits and his ambivalence
toward war, nationalism and what it means to be a hero.
Young Centre for the Performing Arts,
50 Tank House Ln., soulpepper.ca

Toronto Fringe Festival

July 5–16

Programming is selected entirely by lottery, ensuring that new, avant-garde and established acts all have an equal opportunity to get noticed and try new material. It also ensures that shows are varied, novel and full of surprises. Several notable productions began as Fringe Festival premieres, including Kim’s Convenience, ’da Kink in My Hair and Life After. Along with theatrical productions, the Fringe includes dance, visual art, buskers and the FringeKids Venue, where kids pay only five dollars per show. Various venues, fringetoronto.com

Beaches International
Jazz Festival

July 7–30

More than 100 established and emerging musicians perform each year at the Beaches jazz fest, which encompasses genres from calypso to new age to Latin to blues. This year includes the return of Sounds of Leslieville & Riverside, the Beaches Jazz Latin Carnival and music at the Beach Village Kew Gardens. Also, gourmet food trucks fill Queen Street East between Woodbine and Beech from July 27 to 29.
Various venues, beachesjazz.com

SummerWorks
Performance Festival

Aug. 3–13

Each August, SummerWorks, Canada’s largest curated performance festival, hosts more than 60 theatre, dance, music and live art performances by over 500 artist in venues throughout the city. The juried festival is one of the most important places for artists to launch new works, both locally and abroad.
Various venues, summerworks.ca

The Top 5 Places to Eat Right Now in Food-Obsessed Toronto

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The trendy dining room at Hanmoto.

Hanmoto

This tiny west-end spot offers addictive Japanese comfort food like dyno wings: deep-fried, boneless chicken wings that are stuffed with pork, bacon and ginger,slathered in kewpie mayo sauce and served in a takeout box. 2 Lakeview Ave.

Antler

The appropriately named chef Michael Hunter serves up wild and foraged cuisine—including boar, venison and bison. 1454 Dundas St. W.

 Alo

Dig into Alo’s inventive six-course tasting menu to find out why chef Patrick Kriss’s French-dining destination is one of the finest restaurants in Canada. 163 Spadina Ave., 

Jackpot Chicken Rice

Everything on the menu, from the kaffir broccoli tempura to the Hainanese chicken to the rich, schmaltzy rice, is full of exciting flavours, both traditional and new.
318 Spadina Ave. 

Piano Piano

Chef Victor Barry’s chic Italian restaurant is great for kids and a boon to grown-ups who love perfect Neapolitain pizzas (try the Bitters: scamorza, parmesan, dandelion, kale, garlic, chilies and lemon). 88 Harbord St. 

 

8 Steakhouses with More Than Just Sizzle

Lower Dining Room

The luxe dining room at Harbour Sixty.

  1. The Shore Club, one of the city’s newest steakhouses, is located in the heart of the entertainment district, close to venues such as Roy Thomson Hall and the TIFF Bell Lightbox. Along with classic cuts like New York strip loin, bone-in rib steak and filet mignon, there’s a full seafood menu, with stuffed rainbow trout and salmon Wellington. 155 Wellington St. W., 416-351-3311.
  2. Ruth Fertel, founder of the international Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse chain, credited the success of her steaks as much to their sound and smell as to their taste. That’s why steaks at Ruth’s are cooked at nearly 1,000°C, served on an incredibly hot plate and doused with a tablespoon of sizzle-inducing butter before they leave the kitchen. They’re also thick enough to serve two people. 145 Richmond St. W., 416-955-1455.
  3. Morton’s, a Texas-based steakhouse chain, has a modern ambience but still delivers a proper old-school steak—not to mention an impressive number of side dishes, including sautéed broccoli florets, creamed corn, bacon and onion macaroni and cheese, and Parmesan and truffle matchstick fries. 4 Avenue Rd., 416-925-0648.
  4. STK mixes the vibe of a modern restaurant with that of an exclusive nightclub—it even has a live DJ. Along with dry-aged steaks, STK offers some unique drink concoctions, with names like Cucumber Stiletto, Carroted Away and Strawberry Cobbler. 135 Yorkville Ave., 416-613-9660.
  5. At Hy’s Steakhouse, dark mahogany walls and furniture, rich carpets and intimate lighting complement the high quality 28-day-aged Canadian beef. Traditional dishes share a menu with modern fare, including a Dungeness crab cake and a tropical shrimp salad sandwich. 120 Adelaide St. W., 416-364-6600.
  6. Harbour Sixty is seconds from the Air Canada Centre, so don’t be surprised to see a Maple Leaf or two whenever they’re in town. Located in the century-old Habour Commission building, it offers classic fare and has a seafood menu to rival its steaks, with beluga caviar, a daily selection of fresh oysters and a seafood tower with steamed lobster, king crab legs, jumbo black tiger shrimp and oysters. 60 Harbour St., 416-777-2111.
  7. Barberian’s Steak House is one of the oldest steakhouses in Toronto, dating back to 1959. Sitting in the dinning room, you get the impression little has changed since then. Barberian’s butchers and ages all its steaks in-house. Be sure to ask for a tour of the must-be-seen-to-be-believed wine cellar. 7 Elm St., 416-597-0335.
  8. Dine like one of the wealthy entrepreneurs of Toronto past at the Keg Mansion, located in a gothic home once owned by legendary philanthropist Hart Massey. The Keg Steakhouse and Bar is known for its affordable quality and comfortable atmosphere, and that’s still true in its slightly fancier variation here. Pro tip: don’t skip the mashed potatoes. 515 Jarvis St., 416-964-6609.

The Power Plant Celebrates 30 Years

Kapwani Kiwanga, Afrogalactica

Kapwani Kiwanga, Afrogalactica photo by Emma Haug.

ON NOW The Power Plant, a not-for-profit cultural organization on Toronto’s waterfront, turns 30 in 2017. For its anniversary year, it offers a slate of programming reflecting its own history and, in celebration of Canada’s sesquicentennial, that of the country as a whole. The Power Plant’s winter exhibition season asks visitors to consider those who lived here before 1867 and to explore how our colonial legacy affects life today. On Fishes, Horses and Man, which explores marginalized lives and the consequences of slavery, is the first comprehensive solo show for Jonathas de Andrade outside his native Brazil. Canada’s own Maria Hupfield references Anishinaabe oral traditions and feminist performance history in The One Who Keeps On Giving. Another Canadian, Kapwani Kiwanga, features a new film, A Primer, which shows the potential built environments have to affect behaviour. And Latifa Echakhch of Morocco presents a site-specific installation that examines present uncertainty in society by imagining what would happen if the sky was a material object.

 

 

Go Team, Go! Toronto’s Top Sports Bars

Root for your favourite players in style as you fuel up, celebrate or unwind at one of these fine establishments.

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Get a front-row seat to the game with the big screen at the Real Sports Bar & Grill.

  1. Open since 1949, Duffy’s Tavern is the longest operating bar in Bloordale and the fifth oldest bar in Toronto. This local favourite has pool and foosball tables, a great selection of craft beers and spirits, and live music nightly. 1238 Bloor St. W., 416-628-0330.
  2. The Contender in Little Portugal is a hip, yet low-key take on the traditional sports bar. Memorabilia like vintage baseball pennants, signed photos and framed jerseys adorn the walls, and the tables might look a little familiar—they’re made of repurposed bowling alley lanes. The ever-changing menu features concession stand-style eats like pretzels, foot-long hotdogs, and nachos, as well as soft serve beer floats for a sweet, boozy treat. 1166 Dundas St. W., 416-792-3513.
  3. At Wayne Gretzky’s Toronto enjoy draft beer, signature cocktails, or vintages from Wayne Gretzky Estates along with an extensive menu. The Great One’s namesake establishment also features daily specials, including a $5 burger with all the fixings on Fridays. 99 Blue Jays Way, 416-348-0099.
  4. The huge space at The Ballroom easily accommodates large groups. In addition to an abundance of TVs and HD projection screens for watching the game, activities include 10-pin bowling, ping pong, pool, bubble hockey, foosball, and an Xbox corner. Try the poutine with numerous options, including lobster, bacon double cheeseburger, and popcorn chicken. 145 John St., 416-597-2695.
  5. The Loose Moose has been a downtown staple since 1989. Show up on game day for the lively atmosphere and more than 65 varieties of beer on tap. 146 Front St. W., 416-977-8840.
  6. Boasting a two-story-high HD TV, Real Sports Bar & Grill, has a prime location adjacent to the Air Canada Centre. Hungry fans can chow down on a wide selection of burgers and wings as they watch the action on one of the 199 television sets. 15 York St., 416-815-7325.
  7. Owned and operated by former NHL goalie Wayne Cowley, The Bottom Line is conveniently located within walking distance of the Hockey Hall of Fame (page TK) and the Air Canada Centre. Drop by for a pre- or post-game drink and tuck into an assortment of pizza, sandwiches, sliders, nachos, and more. 22 Front St. W., 416-362-7585.
  8. A 90-foot-long sports ticker and a 15-foot widescreen means that you’ll never have to ask for the score at The Shark Club Sports Bar Grill located at Yonge-Dundas Square. Two two happy hours (3 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 p.m. to close Sun.-Thurs.) ensure you won’t miss a second of the action. 10 Dundas St. E., 416-506-0753.

Must-See Performances in November and December

NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER ARE FULL OF EXCITING PERFORMANCES FROM BALLET TO ACROBATICS TO MAGIC, AND MORE  

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The 7 Fingers Cuisine and Confessions merges acrobatics with the art of cooking. Photo by by Alexandre Galliez.

Mirvish Productions, Toronto’s largest theatre company, is closing out 2016 with a program of more esoteric—yet still ambitious—shows to complement its typical grander-scale fare. The 7 Fingers Cuisine and Confessions (November 1 to December 4), for instance, blends acrobatics and cooking in a theatrical feast for the senses, while Fight Night (November 4 to 20) concocts an immersive exploration of democracy—just in time for the fireworks of the U.S. presidential election. And there’s more spectacle to be found in The Illusionists (starts December 13), which features awe-inspiring tricks by seven of the world’s top magicians.

Aligator Pie, Soulpepper

Soulpepper’s Alligator Pie is fun for the whole family. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

The spotlight also shines on sleight of hand courtesy of Soulpepper Theatre Company and magic maestro David Ben’s Hocus Pocus (starts December 10). Equally inventive—and family-friendly—are Rose (December 16, 17, and 22), a concert presentation based on The World Is Round, a children’s book by Gertrude Stein, and Alligator Pie (starts December 27), an award-winning adaptation of Dennis Lee’s poems. 

And for more adult-oriented fare, turn to the Canadian Stage and Daniel MacIvor. His solo show, Who Killed Spalding Gray? (November 30 to December 11), combines the Canadian playwright’s uniquely disarming scripting with some of the titular character’s famed monologues in an interrogation of truth and fiction.

ENCORE PERFORMANCES

A pair of repertory remounts round out the National Ballet of Canada’s year-end slate—alongside its annual production of The Nutcracker (December 10 to 31), naturally. Most recently performed in 2014, James Kudelka’s Cinderella (November 12 to 20) offers a thoroughly modern interpretation of the age-old fairy tale, and later, the expressive Onegin (November 23 to 27)—John Cranko’s adaptation of the Pushkin novel, Eugene Onegin—aims for emotional and psychological nuance even while its dancers push the boundaries of what the human body can do.

Sharing the Four Seasons Centre stage with the National Ballet means that the Canadian Opera Company has for the time being ceded the spotlight, but the COC presents a great reason to return in 2017: its ever-popular production of Mozart’s The Magic Flute (January 19 to February 24).

HITTING THE RIGHT NOTES

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Itzhak Perlman enchants audiences with his performances of beloved movie scores.

The popular music of previous centuries—that is, classical music—is always in vogue with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. But the venerated ensemble keeps up with the times, too, by presenting contemporary scores. Among this winter’s biggest tickets are Itzhak Perlman’s “Cinema Serenade” (November 22)—in which the famed violinist performs themes from films, including Cinema Paradiso, Sabrina and Schindler’s List—and screenings of Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring with live TSO accompaniment (December 1 to 3). Christmas classics also get an airing in variety show-style concerts hosted by Colin Mochrie (December 9 to 11) and Jann Arden (December 13 and 14).

Meanwhile, another hallowed musical institution hones in on jazz. The Royal Conservatory’s Koerner Hall schedule features the likes of Joe Lovano’s quintet with Afro-Cuban piano legend Chucho Valdés (November 9), a cabaret-style pairing of vocalists Laila Biali and Pilar (December 1), and explorations of the trio format with threesomes led by pianist Stefano Bollani, bassist Roberto Occhipinti (both November 18), organist Joey DeFrancesco and saxophonist Christine Jensen (both December 10).

—Craig Moy

Levetto Comes to Chinatown

FIND PASTA, PIZZA, AND MORE AT THE CHINATOWN LOCATION OF LEVETTO

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The truffle oil-drizzled funghi pizza from Levetto.

The Chinatown outpost of Levetto boasts the same oven-baked pizzas and handmade pastas that have made the franchise’s other locations popular. But one menu offering is unique to the menu here: the Peking duck pizza, which use ingredients like hoisin sauce and medium cheddar cheese for an Asian take on an Italian staple. Among the other highlights are the carbonara with a generous helping of smoked bacon, the rigatoni with tender braised beef, and the fungi pizza with truffle oil.  —Karen Stevens

Hazelton Lanes Rebrands as Yorkville Village

HEAD TO BLOOR-YORKVILLE TO CHECK OUT SOME OF THE EXCITING NEW SHOPS IN THE REVITALIZED MALL.

Yorkville Village Exterior

Yorkville Village is home to a variety of upscale shops as well as a Whole Foods.

At the beginning of this year, Hazelton Lanes rebranded itself as Yorkville Village, part of an on-going $100-million transformation by the property’s landlord First Capital Realty. Design firm Kasian is on board to make over the shopping hub into a “neighbourhood centre” that is anchored by Whole Foods. Some leading retailers have already taken up residence, including Montreal-based womenswear boutique Maska Mode, which imports ready-to-wear pieces from Italy; loose, fluid ladies apparel from Belgian label Sarah Pacini; and trendy menswear shop Philip has relocated to a more intimate space where it carries such coveted designers as Hugo Boss, Paul & Shark, Corneliani, and the philip private label.  —Linda Luong Luck

9 Fashion Trends to Fall For

DIRECT FROM THE RUNWAYS, GET THE SEASON’S MOST WEARABLE LOOKS
— Linda Luong Luck