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Winnipeg

Hot Art: March and April

Exhibits worth seeking out over your stay.

"Blood Clots" by Diana Kletke, courtesy of MB Craft Council

“Blood Clots” by Diana Kletke, courtesy of MB Craft Council

THINKING IN THREAD

MAR 3-31 What do a neuroscientist and a craftsperson have in common? It’s not a punchline; Neurocraft, an exhibit authored by the Manitoba Craft Council explores just that. The pieces on display, all inspired by the brain, are the result of a two year collaboration between nine neuroscientists and craft artists. The resulting work blends accessible media, like fibre art and sculpture, with the complex forms of the brain and intricate ideas behind contemporary scientific research. John Buhler Research Centre Atrium, 715 McDermot Ave, manitobacraft.ca

"This Fragile Dwelling-Place" by Janet Shaw-Russel, photo by Kevin Bertram

“This Fragile Dwelling-Place” by Janet Shaw-Russel, photo by Kevin Bertram

BODY TALK

MAR 10-APR 15 Janet Shaw-Russell’s series of drawings, prints, and sculpture, entitled Within, without, began with a medical booklet on lung cancer, a sewing pattern, and her graphite pencils. Exploring the body’s intricacy and fragility, the resulting juxtapositions at Martha Street Studio prompt the viewer to consider such issues as health, medicine, women’s rights, and the plight of garment workers. 11 Martha St, 204‑779‑6253, printmakers.mb.ca

OTHER EXHIBITS

Mar-Apr: A collection of portraits by Michel Saint-Hilaire observes and questions our social environment, showing that we all have a story to tell. La Galerie, Centre culturel franco-manitobain, 340 Provencher Blvd, 204‑233‑8972, ccfm.mb.ca
Mar-Apr: Nature Rearranged: A Century of The Still Life features Canadian and European art from the past century that depict images of flowers.Winnipeg Art Gallery, 300 Memorial Blvd, 204‑786‑6641, wag.ca
Mar-Apr: See Rodin’s The Thinker up close. Winnipeg Art Gallery, 300 Memorial Blvd, 204‑786‑6641, wag.ca
To Mar 11: Wally Dion blends traditional craft with modern technology, drawing connections between quilts and circuitboards.Urban Shaman, 203‑290 McDermot Ave, 204‑942‑2674, urbanshaman.org
To Mar 11: Barry Ace’s Niibwa Ndanwendaagan (My Relatives) is a suite of Anishnaabe bandolier bags (or ‘friendship bags’) adorned with electronic components and a tablet screening historical photographs and archival film of Indigenous peoples. Urban Shaman, 203‑290 McDermot Ave, 204‑942‑2674, urbanshaman.org
Mar 11-24: Object and Complement features three Winnipeg artists whose work explores the relationship between object, subject, and response. Cre8ery,2nd floor, 125 Adelaide St, 204-944-0809, cre8ery.com 
To Mar 17: This Must Be the Place is a collection of work inspired by Winnipeg. Lisa Kehler Art & Projects, 171 McDermot Ave, 204‑510‑0088, lkap.ca
To Mar 31: Station is a meditation on the situation of the radio operator, and the individual’s role as communicators, information gatherers, and distributors. Aceartinc, 290 McDermot Ave, 2nd floor, 204‑944‑9763, aceart.org
To Apr 13: The Frontier School Division Juried Art Show features a selection of artworks by students from Manitoba’s northern schools. Graffiti Gallery, 109 Higgins Ave, 204‑667‑9960, graffitigallery.ca
Mar 3-30: James Culleton exhibits drawings, watercolours, and sculptures from his residency at the nearly-century old McCanna House in North Dakota. Wayne Arthur Gallery,186 Provencher Blvd, 204‑477‑5249, waynearthurgallery.com 
Mar 10-Apr 15: Vital by Darian Gordon Stahl blends photographs and medical scans in a reflection on chronic illness and bodily perception. Martha Street Studio, 11 Martha St, 204‑779‑6253, printmakers.mb.ca
Mar 10-Apr 29: A Piece of Work centres around the scrap material assemblages of Seth Woodyard, while Timothy Joel Dyck’s Workday explores the banal components of work. Street art interventions are featured in Ulmeus Communitas/Elm Community, by Frank Livingston, with wheat pastes of trees in Winnipeg’s Wolseley neighbourhood. Mennonite Heritage Centre Gallery, 600 Shaftesbury Blvd, 204‑888‑6781, gallery.mennonitechurch.ca
Mar 24-26: The annual Over The Top Art Auction and Cupcake Party is the art scene’s sweetest event. Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art, 611 Main St,
204‑949‑9490, mawa.ca
Mar 24-Apr 22: This Must Be the Place (Home Pt 2) features works by three Montreal based artists exploring ideas about home. Lisa Kehler Art & Projects, 171 McDermot Ave, 204‑510‑0088, lkap.ca
Apr 1-26: Coddiwomples by Helma Rogge Rehders takes inspiration from an Old English word meaning to travel purposefully toward a vague destination. The exhibit shows pieces that reflect two decades of work based around marsh and lake landscape. Wayne Arthur Gallery, 204‑477‑5249, waynearthurgallery.com
Mar 2-Apr 8: Cafeteria II is a collection of paintings, photographs, and mixed media sculptures by Elvira Finnegan and Lisa Wood that examines the culture of the University cafeteria. Gallery 1C03, 
1st floor, Centennial Hall, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Ave, 204-786‑9253, uwinnipeg.ca/art-gallery
Starts Apr 14: You Can Never Go Home Again features paintings by Matthew Gardiner. Aceartinc, 290 McDermot Ave, 2nd floor, 204‑944‑9763, aceart.org
Starts Apr 15: Performance artist Ray Fenwick waits behind a curtain for a visitor ready to have a conversation in A Greenhouse. The Valley. Never-Ending Evening.Plug In ICA, Unit 1-460 Portage Ave, 204‑942‑1043, plugin.org
Starts Apr 15: Patrick Cruz claims space and disorients the viewer with his series of maximal floor-to-ceiling paintings, awash in vibrant colour and bold use of line. Plug In ICA, Unit 1-460 Portage Ave, 204‑942‑1043, plugin.org
Starts Apr 20: Collective Voices features an eclectic group of Manitoba artists who vary in medium, style, and point of view. Cre8ery, 2nd floor, 125 Adelaide St, 204-944-0809, cre8ery.com

MORE THINGS TO DO IN WINNIPEG:

Best New Restaurants 2016: The Yearly Round Up of the City’s Hottest Dining
Here & Now: Must-See and Do Activities During Your Stay
Inside the Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Go Jets Go!

Where To Shop on Grosvenor, Stafford, and Lilac

Courtesy of Gravity Lingerie

Courtesy of Gravity Lingerie

Quaint Crescentwood streets, lined with historic homes built for the city’s original blue blood contingent, are perfect for a quiet weekend wander with stops at chic boutiques.

Start at These Four Walls, for an aspirational glimpse at dream décor, and pick up charming accessory pieces for the home.

Nearby Girl Candy Shop has luxe looks for fashionistas, like sharply tailored leather coats.

Around the corner, Gravity Lingerie offers a personalized shopping experience while indulging in lingerie from top European brands.

Travel two blocks to Lilac St, and gather all the ingredients for prime pampering from Maison S, a cozy nook filled with bath and beauty products.

Cap off this opulent shopping trip with reading material from Whodunit? Mystery Bookstore, which has tons of titles to put some thrill into ‘me’ time.

Nearby:

Where to Shop on Corydon
5 Shops for Wellness
Best New Restaurants 2016

Artist Spotlight: Michel Saint Hilaire

Courtesy Michel Saint Hilaire.

Courtesy Michel Saint Hilaire.

If you’ve wandered the streets of Winnipeg, you’ve likely seen some of Michel Saint Hilaire’s work. An accomplished muralist, the Winnipeg artist also creates arresting contemporary pieces that blend seemingly disparate media, inspiration, style, and emotion into an incredible whole.

Michel found his calling in grade school and spent years honing his ability, drawing floor plans of houses and classic cars, a precursor to the architecturally influenced style of his later work. After two years of University training in Fine Arts, where he was taught by renowned Winnipeg artist Ivan Eyre, he began selling his art and painting murals full time.

Though he originally worked solely in pencil, Michel now blends media, usually pencil and acrylic, to create a layered effect punched with contemporary flourishes of line and colour.

Courtesy of Michel Saint Hilaire.

Courtesy of Michel Saint Hilaire.

His latest work was inspired by a 3 week residency in Moncton, NB, during which time he painted roughly 20 portraits of community members. He became enthralled with the unique qualities and complexity of faces, and set out to recreate the experiment with Winnipeg muses. The resulting exhibit, which begins in January, originally featured members of the city’s French speaking arts community, but has evolved to include portraits of famous figures, a mannequin, and the likeness of reclusive photographer Vivian Meier, whose work was recently discovered posthumously. “I started from a place of nurturing my home and community,” says Michel, “Then expanded to painting people that I don’t know, then to pieces that touch on global and environmental issues.”

Michel’s collection of portraits will be exhibited at La Galerie inside the Centre Culturel Franco-Manitobain from January 26. 340 Provencher Blvd, 204‑233‑8972, monmichel.com

Where To Shop Downtown

GOODS ON GRAHAM

Graham Avenue’s central strip, easily accessible by skywalk, is perfect for a downtown shop hop.

Courtesy of Bison Books

Courtesy of Bison Books

Inside the lobby of the Millennium Library, Best of Friends Gift Shop stocks clever giftware, like journals, cards, and fun patterned socks. friendswpl.ca

Another haven for literature lovers, Bison Books is piled high with classic and modern reads, including wide selections of local authors and rare books. bisonbooks.ca

Courtesy of Perfume Paradise.

Courtesy of Perfume Paradise.

Around the corner, on Vaughn Street, nose exclusive and hard to find fragrances at Perfume Paradise. perfumeparadise.ca

Courtesy of Verde Plant Design.

Courtesy of Verde Plant Design.

Verde Plant Design offers a bright and airy escape filled with succulents, air plants, and cacti. verdeterrariums.com

Wrap up a day of shopping at Modern Supply Co. Browse minimalist fashion and luxe homeware, like cozy handwoven pillows by Fable Studio, then relax with a hot cuppa from attached Thom Bargen Coffee & Tea. instagram

More Winnipeg shopping districts:

5 Shopping Neighbourhoods in Winnipeg
Where to shop at The Forks
Where to shop on Academy Road
Top 5 Handmade Hotspots
Where to shop in Osborne Village

Now Open: Two New Restaurants with Old World Charm

Hunter chicken courtesy of Saddlery on Market.

Hunter chicken courtesy of Saddlery on Market.

Newcomer to the East Exchange District, Saddlery on Market, is paying tribute to the historic ‘hood with a gorgeous renovated room and a welcoming menu of comfort food. Modern-meets-heritage touches like barn board, brick, and pendant lighting decorate the space, with placards explaining the locations history as the site of the Great West Saddlery Company. Chef Michael Day does wonders with protein preparations, like delectable hunter chicken. 114 Market Ave, saddleryonmarket.com

Nose-to-tail eating finds a home at new St Boniface spot Bouchee Boucher. The cozy window-wrapped dining room is a backdrop to chef Alex Svenne’s concise small plates menu, which makes excellent use of prime cuts from the attached butcher shop. Items like braised lamb casserole with pomegranate and tahini show global inspiration. 101-300 Tache Ave, boucheeboucher.ca

Where To Shop in St Boniface

Di Erbe lotions. Photo by Ian McCausland.

Di Erbe lotions. Photo by Ian McCausland.

Home of the Festival du Voyageur, St. Boniface is the historic hub of the Franco-Manitobain community. Today, it’s a thriving restaurant and commercial district where shoppers find unique products in neighbourhood boutiques.

At Bra Bar & Panterie, find lovely lingerie as well as a wide variety of swim and beachwear. thebrabar.com

At Wayne Arthur Gallery, browse paintings, sculpture, prints and photographs created by any of the 130 Manitoban artists and artisans they represent. waynearthurgallery.net

Meanwhile, the Boutique du Festival stocks iconic red sashes, long toques, mukluks and fur-lined, leather mitts—the unofficial uniform of February’s festival. festivalduvoyageur.mb.ca

Stock up on an organic vegan scrub, soap or hydrating lotion at di erbe. dierbe.ca

Stop for a slickly swirled latte at Cafe Postal and take home a bag of single origin Pilot Coffee or a Chemex brewer. facebook

More Winnipeg Shopping Stories:

Where to Shop at The Forks
5 Winnipeg Shopping Districts
Where to Shop in River Heights
Top 5 Cultural Treasures

What to Expect at Winnipeg’s Gorgeous Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

By Joelle Kidd

With stunning architecture, a strong mandate, and an eye towards a future of purpose and hope, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights is leading the charge for human rights education.

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Rights for All

Entering into the cool, dark belly of the CMHR feels like the beginning of a journey. This is intentional. Architect Antoine Predock took painstaking care to integrate the building into the land, incorporating elements such as concrete stained the colour of Red River clay, and more than 50 species of indigenous tall grass prairie planted on either side of the building’s concrete “roots”. A massive screen displays video of silhouetted figures writing ‘welcome’ in 36 different languages. Nearby, a fossilized footprint discovered during an archeological dig of the museum’s site in 2008 reinforces this ground’s status as an historical meeting  place; this particular moccasin print is 750 years old.

It’s an impressive start to a visit, one that shows the care taken with every detail in the vast museum. The philosophy is holistic: from the building’s design to individual exhibits, every part of the experience points back to a mandate based around promoting greater understanding of human rights and prompting reflection and dialogue.

The CMHR marks a new generation of museum, one that promotes interaction and hands-on learning, that doesn’t shy away from technology, and is more interested in posing questions than loading visitors up with facts. This is not to say the museum is lacking in material: more than 100 hours of video, 250 artifacts and works of art (including 10 original art pieces), 2,543 images, and 100,000 words of original text are packed into the mammoth space.

Luckily — you guessed it — there’s an app for that. The experience-enriching application is free to download, full of content like an audio tour for self-guided wandering, the ability to sense nearby exhibits, a ‘mood meter’ that allows visitors to rate how they’re feeling and take the temperature of every gallery, and a GPS overlay that adds “hotspots” to a camera’s view of the Winnipeg skyline, pointing out additional attractions in the city.

Moving through the galleries is a conceptual journey from darkness to light, following criss-crossing ramps of backlit Spanish alabaster from the shady entranceway to the sun-dappled Garden of Contemplation, a basalt stone space offering respite and reflection, and up to the glass-walled Tower of Hope, the brilliant panoramic sweep of which symbolizes the impact of changing one’s perspective. Along the way, multimedia exhibits challenge, educate, and inspire. Global events, historic documents, deeply personal stories, and powerful works of art all share the space, providing a deep, rich, and multifaceted view of human rights. Without shying away from the past, the museum points to a better future, highlighting human resilience and ingenuity in the fight for all people to be recognized as free and equal.

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

What You’ll See

The Stories

Lean about historical and contemporary human rights issues through powerful personal stories.
Racial segregation in Canada. A collection of documents and a recreation of a 1940s movie house pay tribute to Viola Desmond, a black Nova Scotian woman who was arrested after sitting in the white-only section of a segregated movie theatre.
Holocaust survivor. Sigi Wasserman, like thousands of Jewish children in Germany, was sent along to Great Britain to escape the Nazis.
Inspiring youth. Craig Kielburger began advocating against child labour when he was only 12 years old. He went on to create an international charity, Free The Children, and the We Day initiative.
A singing activist.
Read about the life of First Nations singer/songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie, hear one of her songs, and see the Oscar she won for her song, “Up Where We Belong”.
Lifting the veil. See Quebec artist Andreanne Paquet’s photo exhibit of Muslim women wearing the hijab, which aims to promote understanding and express freedom of choice.

The Artifacts

Keep an eye out for these fascinating items on display.
A ballot box. This unassuming object has historical significance as the box that held the votes cast in South Africa’s 1994 election, in which Nelson Mandela was elected president.
Suitcases. See luggage belonging to Japanese Canadians interred in camps during World War II.
The world’s largest Metis beaded artwork. This record-holder stands 18 feet tall, made by artist Jennine Krauchi with thousands of antique beads dating back to the fur-trade era.
The Proclamation of the Constitution Act of 1982. The original document, signed by Queen Elizabeth II and Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, enshrines Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
A red prom dress. Worn by Mareisha Rucker, who organized her school’s first integrated prom in Wilcox, Georgia, in 2013.

The Technology

Try out these high tech interactive activities.
The circular basket theatre. An original film exploring Indigenous conceptions of rights and responsibilities plays on a 360 degree screen inside a theatre made from ‘woven’ wood.
Interactive table game. This digital exhibit reacts to shadows of visitors’ hands passing over it.
Lights of Inclusion floor game. A motion sensor tracks movements with colourful spotlights that merge and tremble when visitors interact.
Interactive study table. This long, touch screen table contains information and images about 16 atrocities from around the world.
Digital canvas. A 95-foot canvas in the Canadian Journeys gallery plays silent films that tell individual stories of human rights.

Visitor Information

Visit the Canadian Museum for Human Rights website for admission prices and hours. 90 minute guided tours are available, as well as self-guided audio tours for mobile device from the App Store or Google Play. 3-4 hours are recommended to delve into the CMHR’s massive array of content.

More Winnipeg Attractions:

Hoppy Holidays

Photo courtesy Torque Brewing Co

Photo courtesy Torque Brewing Co

By Joelle Kidd

Craft pints are trending, and a new wave of creative brewers have Winnipeg beer lovers rejoicing. For those with visions of ales and hefeweizen dancing in their heads, these four breweries give local flavour to Christmas festivities.

Photo courtesy Torque Brewing Co

Photo courtesy Torque Brewing Co

Barnhammer Brewing Co

595 Wall St, barnhammerbrewing.ca

Sip on site: Wed-Thu 3 pm-9 pm, Fri-Sat 12 pm-9 pm, Sun 1 pm-6 pm

BYOB: Barnhammer beers are available on tap at several local restaurants and pubs including Barley Brothers, Blind Tiger, The Common at The Forks, Cornerstone, Yellow Dog Tavern, and Peg Beer Co. Growler filling stations are listed on barnhammerbrewing.ca.

Despite being one of the city’s newest brews, Barnhammer’s geometric logo has already popped up on taps across the city. The brewery itself, housed in a stylish industrial space in the West End of the city, opened Winnipeg’s first taproom in July of this year.

A welcoming room with beer hall-style communal tables, the taproom offers the brewery’s 6 signature beers and 2 experimental flavours, including winter favourites like “Grandpa’s Sweater”—a rich, velvety oatmeal stout—and “Coffee Black”, a strong and malty rye pale ale cut with cold brew coffee from local roaster Dogwood Coffee Co.

Half Pints Brewing Company

550 Roseberry St, 204-832-PINT (7468), halfpintsbrewing.com

Sip on Site: Brewery tours offered most Saturdays. Call for details.

BYOB: Half Pints beer is available at all Winnipeg Liquor Mart locations and on tap at numerous local restaurants and pubs.

A decade ago, Half Pints ushered in the craft beer movement in Winnipeg. The independently-owned brewery has gained national recognition and won multiple awards.

Four flagship beers are offered year round: the biting Little Scrapper IPA, malty and floral St James Pale Ale, nutty Bulldog Amber Ale, and a coffee-infused Stir Stick Stout. The brewery also makes regular forays into seasonal specialties, so look out for offerings like Encyclopedia Brown, a hoppy and malty brown ale set to be on tap at restaurants and Liquor Mart growler bars in November.

Photo courtesy of Peg Beer Co

Photo courtesy of Peg Beer Co

Torque Brewing

830 King Edward St, 204-941-1723, torquebrewing.beer

Sip on Site: At time of print, Torque plans to have a taproom open in early November. Call for details.

BYOB: Find Torque products at all Winnipeg Liquor Mart locations and on tap at Yellow Dog Tavern, The King’s Head PubBarley Brothers, The Grove, and Peg Beer Co.

Torque has been sending out beer since late August of this year, to a warm welcome: the brewery is on track to exceed a goal of putting out 1 million L of beer in its first year, recently purchasing 5 additional brewing tanks to keep up with demand.

A range of four tried-and-true brews please beer drinkers of all stripes: a dark stout with hints of roasted coffee, chocolate, and malts, an aromatic and hoppy IPA, a coriander- and citrus-scented Belgian wheat beer, and a Munich style lager. Construction of a taproom is underway at the brewery, with plans to be open early November for hop heads to try before they buy and sample special seasonal brews. Select styles of beer like Barleywine, Russian Imperial Stouts, and sour beers will be available only at the brewery.

Peg Beer Co

125 Pacific Ave, 204-416-2337, pegbeer.com

Sip on Site: Sun-Thu 11 am-11 pm, Fri-Sat 11 am-12 am

BYOB: Peg Beer Co’s brews can be found on tap at Liquor Mart growler bars (call for availability).

Winnipeg’s first brewpub matches craft beer with a rustic menu focused on regional ingredients. Housed inside a former warehouse/skatepark in the east Exchange District, the rustic-industrial space boasts a brewery in the back and tables in the front, where beer connoisseurs can snack on anything from tart house made pickles to full Sunday-dinner style roast chicken or ham.

Four signature beers are now on tap, including a drinkable session ale, a hearty stout, a red ale brewed with rye, and an IPA. Rotating specialty beers branch out from the basics with more complex flavour. Berliner Weisse, a sour white beer, and Saison, a fruity, bottle conditioned variety, are in the works, both having gained growing popularity with beer enthusiasts. For those wanting a peek behind the scenes, the brewery is open for free tours every Monday at 7 pm and 8 pm.

Winnipeg’s Drummer Boy

Sean Quigley has turned his viral internet success into an opportunity to change the world and explore his passion, one song at a time.

Photo courtesy Sean Quigley

Photo courtesy Sean Quigley

By Joelle Kidd

When asked, “why The Little Drummer Boy?”, a grin creeps over Sean Quigley’s face.

“Do you want the cheesy answer—or the real answer?”

The question, of course, refers to Quigley’s video of the same name, which as racked up almost 3.3 million views to date on YouTube. In it, the then 16-year-old, clad in shorts, a toque, and Hudson’s Bay Canada mittens, carries a drum through snowcapped scenes of a Winnipeg winter while an updated version of the carol—complete with buzzy guitar and a drum solo—plays. The video has resonated with a huge number of people, winning internet fame, and has had long lasting impact on many fans.

At the time, Quigley had not the faintest idea that his project would be so successful. “To be honest, I chose the song because of the Boney M Christmas album,” he says. “I just wanted to put my own spin on it.”

Armed with nothing but a borrowed video camera and a school computer covertly loaned by one of his High School teachers, the teenager set out to make a music video. The original plan was to shoot indoors, which turned up too dark on camera. Then, the morning of the planned shoot, Sean awoke to a dazzling snowfall. “I just knew, we can’t miss this,” he says. He and his sister formed a makeshift film crew, loading his drums into the back of her car and driving to his favourite spots around the city.

“I think people relate to its authenticity,” he says. The video was made on a whim, with DIY spirit, at next to no cost, by a young musician. For Quigley, the video’s story is one of searching and finding—a version of his own personal journey. “At the time, I felt like I didn’t have anything to offer the world except music,” he remembers. At the end of the video, the lone drummer stands, overlooking the city, playing his snare drum, his voice finally heard.

In the five years since The Little Drummer Boy was originally posted, Quigley has come a long way. The burst of success that followed his viral video sensation originally took him to Los Angeles, where he ended up on the edge of a quarter million dollar record contract.

But this record deal required compromising the authenticity that had won him fans in the first place. “I couldn’t do it—it didn’t feel right,” he says. “So I walked away.”

Quigley has never regretted turning down the offer. Instead, he has found purpose and the freedom to express himself here in his hometown of Winnipeg.

Online success opened the door to promoting charitable organizations. In one instance, he was offered a partnership deal with Hudsons Bay Company, after they saw the iconic Canada mittens featured in the Little Drummer Boy video. Like the rest of the video shoot, the mittens were chosen for practical reasons—Sean’s hands were cold and he grabbed some mitts out of the car. But he used his newfound clout to collect mittens for Winnipeg’s homeless, and held a special concert with proceeds going to local shelter Siloam Mission.

He has also worked with World Vision, and while travelling with the organization met fellow Winnipegger Karli Gerbrandt, who was working at a non-profit in Cambodia. The two musicians and world travellers reconnected when they returned home to Winnipeg, got married, and began playing music together.

Under the name Bold As Lions, the duo released a full studio album in 2014 called The Hope Movement, a collection of crisp harmonies, earworm hooks, and poignant lyrics. Another album is in the works to be released this year.

For this couple-turned-band, roots in this city go deep. “There’s something special about Winnipeg,” Sean says. “I’ve been fortunate enough to travel the world, but I never feel there’s anything I can’t do right here.”

Find concert schedule and music online at boldaslions.ca.

See the video that started it all:

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Hot Art: Artist Spotlight, Cindy Dyson

"Mid day” Courtesy of Cindy Dyson

“Mid day” Courtesy of Cindy Dyson

Fascinated by the mundane and commonplace at a young age, Cindy Dyson began drawing as a child as a way to find therapy and refuge from her challenging childhood. In her 20s, she fell in love with the work of 19th century Impressionists such as Monet, Renoir and Pissarro. Since then, she has been inspired by the commitment of these artists to depict the beauty and elegance of daily experiences.

Dyson’s exhibition A Pause In Routine at Pulse Gallery is a celebration of everyday life in our 21st century world. Her paintings and  observations reveal the joy, bittersweetness and preciousness of a fleeting moment, presented through bright splashes of colour that exude energy and life. Her work captures street scenes and landscapes of Winnipeg’s cultural hubs like the Exchange District and downtown core.

The process of creating can be time consuming, yet rewarding. Often times, Dyson takes photos of scenery while out with family and friends, and sketches the subject on paper to form composition. She then applies acrylic paint to canvas to create shadow, depth and light. Texture is common in her paintings, as she uses tools like a palette knife, sponge, fork, comb and her fingers to apply paint. “I find the endless variety of marks I can make with these tools challenges and fascinates me,” she says. I love the physicality and range of the knife —aggressive slices, delicate dabs, focused scrapes and thick bold swaths of colour.” The versatility of acrylic paint enables Dyson to splatter, spray, blob and pour, to evoke mood and movement within each piece.

Her collection will be on exhibit at Pulse Gallery from Oct 14-31. Main floor, Johnston Terminal, The Forks, 204-957-7140

Top 5 Restaurants with Live Music

Photo courtesy Prairie Ink Restaurant

Photo courtesy Prairie Ink Restaurant

Dining is not just about taste; get the other senses involved at these restaurants, which offer live music in harmony with mouth-watering flavour.

Prairie Ink Restaurant (pictured), inside McNally Robinson Booksellers, hosts sweet music every Friday and Saturday night. Acoustic crooners and jazz trios are the backdrop to healthful eats like kicky curried spaghetti squash. Reservations preferred. 1120 Grant Ave, 204‑975‑2659, mcnallyrobinson.com/restaurant

Hip venue The Good Will slings java during the day and sates late night cravings with slices from Little Pizza Heaven. Indie rock, jazz, and hip hop artists usually take the stage. 625 Portage Ave, 204-221-1577, thegoodwill.ca

Excellent pub grub, like indulgent pulled pork poutine, makes Le Garage the place to lounge. Consistent live shows range from local legends to open mics. 166 Provencher Blvd, 204‑237‑0737, garagecafe.ca

Expert musicians tickle the ivories at swanky Palm Lounge inside the Fort Garry Hotel while the kitchen plays with on seasonal, scratch-made fare. Jazz and classical piano is de-rigeur, often with a talented vocalist joining in. 222 Broadway, 204‑942‑8251, fortgarryhotel.com/dining

Winnipeg’s stellar jazz scene can be found at Nicolino’s every week at the Wednesday Night Hang. Budding musicians and seasoned pros share the stage, while diners sample rustic Italian cuisine. 2077 Pembina Hwy, 204‑269‑5004, nicolinosrestaurant.com

Hot Shopping Editor’s Pick: Top 5 Handmade Hotspots

Earrings (CJ Tennant) Courtesy of Winnipeg Art Gallery

Earrings (CJ Tennant) Courtesy of Winnipeg Art Gallery

These Manitoba makers craft artisanal items that spark conversation and make a statement.

   Erin Kembel of EMK Clothing designs with style and comfort in mind. Her studio boutique boasts vibrant printed dresses, bags and tops all made in-store by hand. 143 Sherbrook St, 204‑691‑4414, Map 1: R-2

The spacious loft at The Forks Trading Company showcases the work of more than 250 local makers, including plant-based lip balm from Hogwash Bath & Body. 1 Forks Market Rd, 204‑949‑1785, Map 1: Q-5

Fitness fanatics love the versatile workout gear by LBS Yoga & Athletic Wear. Make each sun salutation a style statement in the breathable and stretchy galaxy printed Trixie legging. Home Run Sports, 20 De La Seigneurie Blvd, 204‑255‑7687, Map 2: E-4

Keepsakes Gallery is stocked with the work of Manitoba artists, including floral greeting cards and acrylic paintings by artist Joy Winter-Schmidt. 626.5 West Broadway, 204-295-9257, Map 1: Q-3

An eclectic mix of Canadian-made wares line the shelves at The Gallery Shop. Glitzy earrings by CJ Tennant (pictured) get their shine from a combination of sterling silver and semi-precious stones. 300 Memorial Blvd, 204-786-6641, Map 1: P-3