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Whistler

Canuck Clothing

By SHERI RADFORD

Channel your inner Canadian with patriotic pieces from Roots.

Channel your inner Canadian with patriotic pieces from Roots.

Whether you’re a Canadian or you just want to dress like one, Roots has something for you. Founded in 1973 in Ontario, the company is virtually synonymous with the True North Strong and Free. Especially popular this year is the Cooper Canada Kanga Hoody (pictured), part of the Canada 150 collection that celebrates the country’s sesquicentennial. Consider it Canadian camouflage: slip one on, grab a hockey stick and a beer, and you’ll blend right in, eh.

Timeless Treasures

By CHLOË LAI

Striking and environmentally conscientious jewellery makes a great souvenir.

Striking and environmentally conscientious jewellery makes a perfect souvenir.

Bring home a piece of the Pacific Northwest with Jodi Stark’s elegant jewellery, made from reclaimed wood. Treasures salvaged from beaches and scrap piles are given new life as one-of-a-kind wearable art that celebrates the natural beauty of the West Coast. Accentuated with sterling silver details and strung from delicate chains, these reclaimed maple, black walnut, arbutus and cherry wood pieces are as timeless and unique as the memories you’ll make during your visit. Find yours at the Audain Art Museum or online at www.jodistark.ca.

Eco-friendly Tips for Tourists

By CHLOË LAI

Enjoy the best of Whistler by bike. (Photo: Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler)

Enjoy the best of Whistler by bike. (Photo: Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler)

Countless travellers have fallen for Whistler’s natural good looks—here are some ways to keep it lush by making your visit environmentally friendly: Make the most of that fresh mountain air by walking or cycling everywhere. Check bin labels to see whether items are compostable or recyclable before putting them in the trash. Carry reusable water bottles and shopping bags so you can sip glacier-fed tap water while loading up on locally designed souvenirs. And come back soon, because visitors like you are part of what makes Whistler beautiful.

Art: Whimsical World

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

"The Wind and the Water", by Dana Irving.

“The Wind and the Water”, by Dana Irving.

The wild West Coast gets a dash of whimsy in the hands of landscape artist Dana Irving. The artist’s playful, minimalist world has been described as a blend of Emily Carr and Dr. Seuss, and includes works such as “The Wind and the Water” (pictured). Irving captures the Pacific Northwest’s towering peaks and treetops—and everything in-between—in bold, stylized pieces that celebrate a spiritual connection with nature. Explore her great outdoors at Adele Campbell Fine Art Gallery.

On a High Note

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

The Treetop Adventure Course is not your average walk in the woods.

The Treetop Adventure Course is not your average walk in the woods.

Trekking through the treetops isn’t just for Tarzan anymore. Now, regular Joes and Janes can have a ball in the branches as they swing, scamper, climb and zip through 70 different aerial obstacles, some as high as 18 m (60 ft). Even little canopy climbers can test their balance on the kids’ course. Learn the ropes—and maybe even thump your chest a little—on the Treetop Adventure Course.

Take a Hike

By SHERI RADFORD

Spectacular scenery awaits you in Whistler, BC. (Photo: Mitch Winton/Coast Mountain Photography and Whistler Blackcomb)

Spectacular scenery awaits you in Whistler, BC. (Photo: Mitch Winton/Coast Mountain Photography and Whistler Blackcomb)

Whether you’re a rambling rambler or a hard-core hiker or somewhere in-between, you’ll find the right route here. The 40-km (25-mi) Valley Trail, which is paved but non-motorized, connects all of Whistler’s parks, lakes and neighbourhoods, from Cheakamus River to Creekside to Green Lake. The trails around Lost Lake are ideal for a leisurely stroll, even with a baby stroller in tow. Seeking more adventure? Head for the hills—Whistler and Blackcomb mountains, that is, where the lift-accessed alpine hiking trails range from the easy Whistler Summit Interpretive Walk to the advanced Alpine Walk to Overlord Trail to Decker Loop on Blackcomb. Lace up those hiking boots and get moving.

Best for Brunch

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

Start your day off right at Fergie's Cafe. (Photo: Darby Magill)

Start your day off right at Fergie’s Cafe. (Photo: Darby Magill)

In Whistler, brunch is mountain-activity fuel and a reason to drink mimosas before noon, all rolled into one. Start the day at Wild Wood Pacific Bistro, where nine varieties of eggs Benny (try the sampler plate) and legendary banana bread French toast are on offer. Cheeky Southside Diner serves favourites like the big-ass pancake—go ahead, add chocolate chips—and breakfast poutine. For brunch en français, head to Crêpe Montagne for a delectable array of sweet and savoury crepes. A gem along the Sea-to-Sky for homemade fare, Fergie’s Cafe (pictured) regularly packs its teeny interior with brunch-goers who spill out onto the lawn. Brunch bliss, found.

Recipe for Revelry at Bearfoot Bistro

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

Memorable meals await at Bearfoot Bistro.

Memorable meals await at Bearfoot Bistro.

Bearfoot Bistro—one part culinary amusement park, one part fine-dining fixture—is the kind of place foodies write home about, thanks to its 20,000-bottle wine cellar, ice-encased vodka tasting room and palm tree–studded patio. Here it’s possible to sabre a bottle of champagne, don a parka to sip sub-zero spirits and indulge in three- or five-course tasting menus, all in one elegant evening. Now that’s a wild ride.

The Green Scene

By SHERI RADFORD

Watch the sun come up over Alta Lake, at Rainbow Park. (Photo: Justa Jeskova/Tourism Whistler)

Watch the sun come up over Alta Lake, at Rainbow Park. (Photo: Justa Jeskova/Tourism Whistler)

Want to experience the great outdoors? There’s a lot of it to choose from here. Rainbow Park (pictured) and Lost Lake Park are two popular summertime destinations for sunbathing, swimming, picnics, alfresco yoga and impromptu wedding proposals. Located on Alta Lake, which looks especially magnificent at sunrise, Rainbow Park has beach volleyball nets and an off-leash area for dogs. Lost Lake Park, on tranquil and secluded Lost Lake, has a sandy beach and extensive hiking and biking trails. This summer, there’s one more reason to plan an outing: every day from Jul. 1 to Sep. 4, a food truck is visiting each of the two parks. The great outdoors just got a little greater.

Golfer’s Paradise: Time for Tee

By SHERI RADFORD

Take a swing at the great outdoors, at Whistler Golf Club. (Photo: Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler)

Take a swing at the great outdoors, at Whistler Golf Club. (Photo: Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler)

If you’re keen to hit the greens, Whistler is happy to oblige. Designed by Robert Trent Jones Jr. and carved into the side of Blackcomb Mountain, Fairmont Chateau Whistler Golf Club boasts breathtaking views of the valley. On the picturesque shores of Green Lake, Nicklaus North Golf Course is one of just a few courses in the world that bears Jack Nicklaus’s name. A few minutes’ walk from the Village, the Arnold Palmer–designed Whistler Golf Club (pictured) has nine lakes, two creeks, stunning mountain views—and the occasional bear sighting. Further afield, Furry Creek Golf and Country Club, Big Sky Golf and Country Club and Squamish Valley Golf Club all offer carefully crafted courses with unparalleled West Coast views. Fore!

Welcome to Whistler Farmers’ Market

By SHERI RADFORD

There's something for everyone at the Whistler Farmers' Market. (Photo: Chad Chomlack/Tourism Whistler)

There’s something for everyone at the Whistler Farmers’ Market. (Photo: Chad Chomlack/Tourism Whistler)

Think the Whistler Farmers’ Market is just for locals? Think again. Running from Jun. 18 to Oct. 8, this popular outdoor marketplace offers a lot more than just fresh produce. While browsing for handcrafted jewellery, clothing and souvenirs, you can sample artisan foods, watch cooking demonstrations, listen to live music, get the kids’ faces painted—and, of course, buy fresh produce, grown nearby in the Pemberton Valley.

Ask an Insider

Whistler’s concierges dish on their favourite eateries

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

Show-stopping charcuterie at Basalt. (Photo: Brad K)

Show-stopping charcuterie at Basalt. (Photo: Brad K)

HIDDEN GEM

Tucked away in quiet Creekside, Red Door Bistro packs in locals for French cuisine with a West Coast twist. Out-of-the-way Alta Bistro delights diners with sustainable farm-to-fork fare in an intimate space. At Basalt, the volcanic-rock bar and hand-crank meat slicer catch the eye, but it’s the charcuterie and seasonal dishes that steal the show. (more…)