• eat
  • shop
  • see
  • go
  • stay
  • daytrip
  • map
  • calendar
  • transport
  • weather
  • currency
  • tofrom

What to See Whistler

Art: Whimsical World

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

"The Wind and the Water", by Dana Irving.

“The Wind and the Water”, by Dana Irving.

The wild West Coast gets a dash of whimsy in the hands of landscape artist Dana Irving. The artist’s playful, minimalist world has been described as a blend of Emily Carr and Dr. Seuss, and includes works such as “The Wind and the Water” (pictured). Irving captures the Pacific Northwest’s towering peaks and treetops—and everything in-between—in bold, stylized pieces that celebrate a spiritual connection with nature. Explore her great outdoors at Adele Campbell Fine Art Gallery.

On a High Note

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

The Treetop Adventure Course is not your average walk in the woods.

The Treetop Adventure Course is not your average walk in the woods.

Trekking through the treetops isn’t just for Tarzan anymore. Now, regular Joes and Janes can have a ball in the branches as they swing, scamper, climb and zip through 70 different aerial obstacles, some as high as 18 m (60 ft). Even little canopy climbers can test their balance on the kids’ course. Learn the ropes—and maybe even thump your chest a little—on the Treetop Adventure Course.

Take a Hike

By SHERI RADFORD

Spectacular scenery awaits you in Whistler, BC. (Photo: Mitch Winton/Coast Mountain Photography and Whistler Blackcomb)

Spectacular scenery awaits you in Whistler, BC. (Photo: Mitch Winton/Coast Mountain Photography and Whistler Blackcomb)

Whether you’re a rambling rambler or a hard-core hiker or somewhere in-between, you’ll find the right route here. The 40-km (25-mi) Valley Trail, which is paved but non-motorized, connects all of Whistler’s parks, lakes and neighbourhoods, from Cheakamus River to Creekside to Green Lake. The trails around Lost Lake are ideal for a leisurely stroll, even with a baby stroller in tow. Seeking more adventure? Head for the hills—Whistler and Blackcomb mountains, that is, where the lift-accessed alpine hiking trails range from the easy Whistler Summit Interpretive Walk to the advanced Alpine Walk to Overlord Trail to Decker Loop on Blackcomb. Lace up those hiking boots and get moving.

The Green Scene

By SHERI RADFORD

Watch the sun come up over Alta Lake, at Rainbow Park. (Photo: Justa Jeskova/Tourism Whistler)

Watch the sun come up over Alta Lake, at Rainbow Park. (Photo: Justa Jeskova/Tourism Whistler)

Want to experience the great outdoors? There’s a lot of it to choose from here. Rainbow Park (pictured) and Lost Lake Park are two popular summertime destinations for sunbathing, swimming, picnics, alfresco yoga and impromptu wedding proposals. Located on Alta Lake, which looks especially magnificent at sunrise, Rainbow Park has beach volleyball nets and an off-leash area for dogs. Lost Lake Park, on tranquil and secluded Lost Lake, has a sandy beach and extensive hiking and biking trails. This summer, there’s one more reason to plan an outing: every day from Jul. 1 to Sep. 4, a food truck is visiting each of the two parks. The great outdoors just got a little greater.

Golfer’s Paradise: Time for Tee

By SHERI RADFORD

Take a swing at the great outdoors, at Whistler Golf Club. (Photo: Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler)

Take a swing at the great outdoors, at Whistler Golf Club. (Photo: Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler)

If you’re keen to hit the greens, Whistler is happy to oblige. Designed by Robert Trent Jones Jr. and carved into the side of Blackcomb Mountain, Fairmont Chateau Whistler Golf Club boasts breathtaking views of the valley. On the picturesque shores of Green Lake, Nicklaus North Golf Course is one of just a few courses in the world that bears Jack Nicklaus’s name. A few minutes’ walk from the Village, the Arnold Palmer–designed Whistler Golf Club (pictured) has nine lakes, two creeks, stunning mountain views—and the occasional bear sighting. Further afield, Furry Creek Golf and Country Club, Big Sky Golf and Country Club and Squamish Valley Golf Club all offer carefully crafted courses with unparalleled West Coast views. Fore!

In Your Element

For those who love the river, the road or the sky—or all three—adventure awaits

By CHLOË LAI

Even beginners can handle white water rapids on the Elaho River. (Photo courtesy Sunwolf)

Even beginners can handle white water rapids on the Elaho River. (Photo courtesy Sunwolf)

Make a Splash

Whistler’s rivers and lakes are icy, but the action is hot. Thrill-seeking travellers and fun-loving families put their paddling power to the test by rafting through glacier-fed white water rapids with Sunwolf. With adventures for every ability level, from the roaring Elaho to the gently rolling Cheakamus River, there are plenty of opportunities to get your feet—and everything else—wet. Those looking for a more meditative experience can head over to Backroads Whistler and glide gently down the River of Golden Dreams in a canoe or kayak, with fresh air courtesy of the old-growth forest. Drift solo, or go with a guide to discover the stories behind every landmark. (more…)

All in a Day

Pack a lifetime of memories into 24 hours

By CHLOË LAI

MitchWinton_CoastMountainPhotography_RendezvousLodge

Rendezvous Lodge photo ©Mitch Winton/Coast Mountain Photography

Hit the Rendezvous Lodge for snacks with a side of gorgeous valley scenery.

mikecrane_june5_2014_001

Peak 2 Peak Gondola photo by Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler

Blow your mind with 360-degree views from the Peak 2 Peak Gondola. (more…)

On a High Note

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

Enjoy the view at the summit lodge. (Photo: Keegan Pearson Photography)

Enjoy the view at the summit lodge. (Photo: Keegan Pearson Photography)

Want that top-of-the-world feeling? At the Sea to Sky Gondola, it’s just a 10-minute ride away. Perched 885 m (2,900 ft) above sea level, the summit lodge is a jumping-off point for further adventures, with pristine trails perfect for hiking and snowshoeing. The young—and young at heart—slide at the tube park, while experienced skiers glide into the backcountry. Others simply settle in for the breathtaking views of Howe Sound. Paradise, found.

Go for Gold at Whistler Blackcomb

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

Whistler Skier's Plaza

Whistler Skier’s Plaza. (Photo: Justa Jeskova/Tourism Whistler)

Whistler Blackcomb has never been afraid to think big. In fact, the ski resort’s foundations are built on the biggest dreams of all: the Olympics. In the 1960s, four Vancouver businessmen developed the area with the intent of bidding on the 1968 Winter Olympics. Three more bids and decades later, the town finally succeeded with the 2010 Winter Games. Along the way, the mountain resort accumulated its own accolades, including the number one rating overall by SKI Magazine—three years in a row. Add in awards for dining, après-ski and terrain, plus the record-breaking Peak 2 Peak, and it’s clear the resort never gave up its gold-medal bid

By the Numbers: Peak 2 Peak Gondola

The math is simple: two mountains and the record-breaking Peak 2 Peak Gondola all add up to one awesome experience

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

The Peak 2 Peak Gondola. (Photo: Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler)

The Peak 2 Peak Gondola. (Photo: Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler)

1 The gondola is the first in the world to link the peaks of two mountains, a feat that delivers truly one-of-a-kind views.

3 It’s one for the books: the Peak 2 Peak broke three Guinness World Records, claiming fame as the world’s longest unsupported span, the highest lift of its kind, and the longest continuous lift system.

(more…)

Outstanding Art at Audain

By LOUISE PHILLIPS

Audain Art Museum

Audain Art Museum

The sheer numbers are impressive. The Audain Art Museum’s  seven galleries of Northwest Coast art enshrine 200 works spanning 200 years of art-making in BC. Acquired by Vancouver philanthropists Michael and Yoshiko (Karasawa) Audain, the collection honours 11 indigenous cultures, from the Coast Salish in southern BC to the Tlingit in the north. Traditional ceremonial masks and textile art contrast with modern, genre-bending pieces by Bill Reid, Brian Jungen and Don Yeomans. Galleries celebrate the vivid marinescapes of E.J. Hughes and studies of Native villages by pioneer painter Emily Carr. Contemporary BC artists such as Attila Richard Lukacs and Ken Lum suit the minimalist design of this serene, airy space. It all adds up to a memorable journey through BC art.

History Comes Alive at Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre

By SHERI RADFORD

Learn about the local First Nations at Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre

Learn about local First Nations culture at Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre

Centuries before skiers and snowboarders took over Whistler, the Squamish and Lil’wat people lived, fished and hunted in the region. Celebrating the diverse cultures of these two First Nations groups, the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre brims with information and hands-on exhibits. Prepare to be fascinated.