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What to See Vancouver

Picture Perfect: Vancouver’s Best Springtime Photo Ops

By SHERI RADFORD
Mar. 2019

Cherry blossoms in False Creek (Photo by KK Law)

Every spring, Mother Nature decks out the city in glorious pink and white petals. The best places to spot cherry blossoms include the West End, Stanley Park, Queen Elizabeth Park, VanDusen Botanical Garden, and False Creek near Granville Island (pictured). (more…)

Public Art: Acoustic Anvil in Olympic Village

By JILL VON SPRECKEN
Mar. 2019

“Acoustic Anvil: A Small Weight to Forge the Sea” by Maskull Lasserre (Photo by KK Law)

Normally the tool of metalworkers or vengeful cartoon characters, anvils don’t often turn up in day-to-day life. Unless you happen to pass Leg-In-Boot Square, where Maskull Lasserre’s colossal installation “Acoustic Anvil: A Small Weight to Forge the Sea” arrived last fall. It’s part of the Vancouver Biennale, a public art exhibit that brings large-scale sculptures to the city’s streets. And although its landing place may seem haphazard, the aptly named square was actually once a place of industry, home to boat builders and stevedores. (It was also where a boot with a leg still in it was displayed in 1886, in hopes that the owner might return to claim it—hence the name.) The prodigious art piece isn’t just a nod to the past—it’s a tool-turned-instrument, thanks to the delicate violin f-hole that slices through the anvil’s centre. Put your ear to it and tune in to the sounds of the ocean, just as you would a conch shell. Hear that? It’s the sound of the area’s sea-bound past and future.

A Fan-Tastic Weekend: Fan Expo Vancouver

By SHERI RADFORD

Fan Expo Vancouver is the perfect time to break out your best costumes

Mar. 1 to 3, 2019 Whether you belong to the “May the Force be with you” or the “Live long and prosper” galaxy of geekdom—or another one entirely—you’re sure to find like-minded uber-nerds at Fan Expo Vancouver. Fanboys and fangirls of all ages don elaborate costumes and line up to meet celebs such as George Takei (Star Trek), Billy Dee Williams (Star Wars), Pamela Anderson (Baywatch), and Cary Elwes and Wallace Shawn (both from The Princess Bride). Will you try to be there? As Yoda said, “Do or do not; there is no try.”

There’s Snow on Them Thar Hills

By SHERI RADFORD
Feb. 2019

Photo by Leo Zuckerman/Destination BC

Vancouverites are persnickety about snow, and most have a strong opinion about where it belongs: on the mountains. Fortunately, Grouse (pictured), Seymour and Cypress mountains are all nearby, and a picturesque two-hour drive leads to the winter wonderland of Whistler Blackcomb. The Old Farmer’s Almanac is predicting plenty of the white stuff in early to mid-January and late February, so pull out your skis, snowboard or snowshoes and get ready to head for the hills!

Celebrating the Lunar New Year in Vancouver

By SHERI RADFORD

Photo courtesy Coast Mountain Photography/Tourism Vancouver

Multiple Dates, 2019 Usher in Lunar New Year by going whole hog—it’s the year of the pig, after all. On Feb. 10, the Spring Festival Parade winds through Chinatown, as traditional lion dancers join dance troupes, martial artists and more. The annual Temple Fair at Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden (Feb. 10) fetes the occasion with a full line-up of activities. And the celebrations at International Village Mall (Feb. 8 to 10) include souvenirs, live entertainment and delectable bites. Gung hay fat choy!

Local Lore: High-Priority Powder

By CHLOË LAI
Jan. 2019

Photo by Mike Crane/Tourism Whistler

Ever hear of the 30-cm (1-ft) rule? Rumour has it that when that amount of fresh powder falls overnight, some businesses open late to give lucky locals a chance to get a few rides and ski runs in before work. The luckiest folks, however, are visitors who get to stay out in the snow all day. Ride on!

Two of a Kind: Dundarave Print Workshop + Gallery Exhibits Two Top-Notch Printmakers

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

“The Ridge” by Betty Jean Drummond

Jan. 23 to Feb. 24, 2019 Look back on the careers of two powerhouse printmakers at Dundarave Print Workshop + Gallery. The best of both their worlds is on display in Betty Jean Drummond and Marijke Nap: A Retrospective of Two Highly Regarded Resident Printmakers. See Drummond’s richly textured landscapes (“The Ridge,” pictured) alongside Nap’s whimsical assemblage works. Both draw from a wealth of inspiration—Drummond studied with contemporaries like A.Y. Jackson, while Nap’s Brazilian upbringing is visible in her work. Two printmakers are better than one.

New Year, New Art at the Contemporary Art Gallery

By JILL VON SPRECKEN
Jan. 2018

“Abandoned Details 4” by Anna Torma (Photo courtesy the artist/Esker Foundation)

Multiple dates Starting the New Year off with a bang, the Contemporary Art Gallery presents three—nearly simultaneous—January exhibit openings. On Jan. 18, two solo shows take over the gallery space: Chair for a Woman, featuring imaginative sculptural works by Anne Low, and If No One Asks, Aslan Gaisumov’s thought-provoking still and moving images. They join off-site exhibit How far do you travel?, which takes over the streets as of Jan. 17. The innovative exhibition wraps city buses in works by five Canadian artists, such as “Abandoned Details 4” (pictured) by Anna Torma. Consider it a cultural tour de force.

Like a Local: Ice Skating at Robson Square

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

Robson Square Ice Rink (Photo by KK Law)

To Feb. 28, 2019 Besides saying “sorry,” ice skating may be one of the most Canadian activities out there. Take part in this patriotic tradition at Robson Square Ice Rink, which appeals to aspiring Sidney Crosbys and Patrick Chans alike. And aside from showing off your triple lutz to all your new (and very polite) Canuck friends, the best part is entry is free and skate rentals are only $5. Prefer to stick to the sidelines? Watch all the action with a warm drink from the concession. Get ready to glide.

Canadian Artist Paul Ygartua’s Vivid Works at Ukama Gallery

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

“Fiesta” by Paul Ygartua (Image courtesy the artist)

Jan. 18 to 31, 2019 Depth of colour and feeling combine in vibrant works by Canadian artist Paul Ygartua. His pieces create dimension through a unique backdrop of canvas and plexiglass—a medium he developed back in 1980 (“Fiesta,” pictured). Peruse his paintings at Ukama Gallery’s Primordial Abstraction: Depth & Illusion.

Museum of Anthropology: Marking the Infinite

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

“Women Ceremonies at Watanuma” by Wintijiya Napaltjarri (Photo by Sid Hoeltzell. Collection of Debra and Dennis Scholl. © Wintijiya Napaltjarri. Licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd. Courtesy Papunya Tula Artists)

To Mar. 31, 2019 In the Museum of Anthropology’s latest exhibit, it’s hard to decide what’s more fascinating: the art or the artists. Marking the Infinite features pieces by nine Aboriginal women, all celebrated artists from remote Australian communities. Each brings her own ancient cultural traditions to her work, but they also connect with larger contemporary themes. Explore the life and work of artists like Wintjiya Napaltjarri (“Women Ceremonies at Watanuma,” pictured). Her bold red shapes and swoops often represent flying-ant eggs and hair-string skirts. Now that’s fascinating.

Seasonal Sparkle at Capilano Suspension Bridge

By JILL VON SPRECKEN

Festive holiday photo opportunities await at Capilano Suspension Bridge’s Canyon Lights

To Jan. 27, 2019 For that festive feeling, head to Capilano Suspension Bridge’s Canyon Lights. There, brilliant light displays take hundreds of thousands of twinkling bulbs to new heights—from the glittering bridge to dazzling decked-out Douglas firs, eight of the world’s tallest Christmas trees. To keep the whole family merry and bright, there’s gingerbread decorating, scavenger hunts and sing-along carols. And with partial proceeds supporting the BC Professional Fire Fighters’ Burn Fund, the real spirit of the season is celebrated, too. Very merry.