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travel photography

Western Canada’s 12 Best Hot Springs

By WAHEEDA HARRIS

Lussier Hot Springs (Photo: Tourism BC/Dave Heath)

With cool nights year-round in the Canadian Rockies and on Canada’s the west coast, a soak in a warm pool is a welcome end to a hard day on the trail or a bonus for surviving another work week. The lack of options in eastern Canada isn’t an oversight: the subterranean thermal activity that feeds the springs only exists out west. (more…)

Hay Bales on the Prairies—Near Calgary, Alberta

Submit your photo to our Flickr Group to see your favourite travel shot as part of our Photo Friday feature on Where.ca! We’ll credit you and link to your photo.

Why We Chose It

Fall is here and that means (what else?) hay baling season is imminent. A shot of the wide open skies of the Prairies is always meditative, and this image of hay bales diminishing off into the horizon is particularly peaceful. The second “horizon line” that the photographer has cleverly worked into the foreground adds an extra bit of visual interest. And the slightly overcast sky, while not the typical brilliant blue of a Prairies postcard, is perfect for this time of year, suggesting a crisp autumn chill.

Photo: m.ann.n

Seaside Cove—Near Halifax, Nova Scotia

Submit your photo to our Flickr Group to see your favourite travel shot as part of our Photo Friday feature on Where.ca! We’ll credit you and link to your photo.

Why We Chose It

We admit we haven’t pinpointed exactly where this was taken (if you know, drop us a line), but it’s a perfect representation of the many coves and inlets along Nova Scotia’s Atlantic coast. The vintage effect used, with the washed-out colours, works well here, since you can image this scene hasn’t changed much in the past thirty or forty years. The effect also reinforces the entire sleepy fishing village mood. It doesn’t hurt that the photographer framed everything expertly, creating a beautiful path for the eyes through the water to the ocean.

Photo: Wade Kelly

Telus Toll Building—Edmonton, Alberta

Submit your photo to our Flickr Group to see your favourite travel shot as part of our Photo Friday feature on Where.ca! We’ll credit you and link to your photo.

Why We Chose It

The glass-and-concrete Telus Toll Building across from Edmonton’s splashier, pyramid-topped City Hall is normally no great charmer, but this photographer has found the beauty in it by capturing reflections in the windows in just the right light. We love the way the windows and beams frame the photo. With the benefit of a good eye, this somber building has become a piece of modern art.

Photo: Darren Kirby

Travel Tip of the Week

When shooting a landmark or scenery, add an element in the foreground of your photo to add some interest. (Thanks to photographer Ralph Velasco for this tip. See how it dramatically improves a photo here.)

Give us your tips! Add a comment below or let us know on Twitter @wherecanada: #wherecanadatips.

Giles Lake—Outaouais, Quebec

Submit your photo to our Flickr Group to see your favourite travel shot as part of our Photo Friday feature on Where.ca! We’ll credit you and link to your photo.

Why We Chose It

You have to get up pretty early to get a shot like this. The water is like glass in this sunrise shot, and the colours are spectacularly vibrant. We love the many layers created by the treeline, the mist, the rounded mountain behind and everything again in the reflection. And the sun creeping in from the left uplifts the entire shot. This quiet corner of Quebec, near Gracefield in the Outaouais region about an hour-and-a-half north of Ottawa, couldn’t have been captured more beautifully.

Photo: Phil Grondin

Auyuittuq National Park—Baffin Island, Nunavut

Submit your photo to our Flickr Group to see your favourite travel shot as part of our Photo Friday feature on Where.ca! We’ll credit you and link to your photo.

Why We Chose It

How is it that Nunavut looks like a seaside beach resort? Landscape shots on Baffin Island are always stunning, but the photographer was smart here to include humans in the photo to provide a sense of scale. And the scale is astounding! The photo is amazingly crisp and well-framed. The clear blue waters and the unspoiled beach beside the granite mountains are everything we love about this northern territory: solitude, jaw-dropping landscapes and untouched beauty. It’s a part of Canada few of us get to see in person—all the better for the continued existence this pristine slice of nature.

Photo: Peter Morgan

Graffiti—Old Montreal, Quebec

Submit your photo to our Flickr Group to see your favourite travel shot as part of our Photo Friday feature on Where.ca! We’ll credit you and link to your photo.

Why We Chose It

Granted, the wow factor of this photo is largely about the graffiti artist, but the photographer deserves credit, too, for framing this image so well and having the foresight to recognize it as a compelling subject. It’s simply amazing how multidimensional the work is—at first it seemed to be a painting on a window looking through to a building. Only at second glance was it apparent that the artwork was painted onto the building (the Old Misson Brewery in Old Montreal). Graffiti is well-established high art in Montreal, and this is just one of many examples. Check out the work of A’shop, for example.

Photo: Emmanuel Milou

Grimface Mountain—Cathedral Provincial Park, British Columbia

Submit your photo to our Flickr Group to see your favourite travel shot as part of our Photo Friday feature on Where.ca! We’ll credit you and link to your photo.

Why We Chose It

Part of the Cascade mountain range, Grimface, in southern B.C., is an impressive sight no matter the time of day. But when the sun goes down, its grey facade is transformed to brilliant fiery orange and the result is magical. All it needs is a patient photographer to capture it at just the right moment.

Photo: Drew Brayshaw

Canada’s 16 Most Photographed Places

By SHANNON KELLY

Niagara Falls, the world’s most photographed waterfalls (Photo: scazon)

Whether wonders of nature, man-made monuments or iconic landscapes, these sights across Canada are those you’re most likely to find on a postcard, and least likely to be able to resist photographing yourself.

We gathered statistics from tourism boards and industry associations, reputable news outlets and online photo-sharing libraries to come up with this list of Canada’s most photographed places in every province. (more…)

Travel Photo Tips: Take Better Pictures of Landmarks

Vancouver’s Lion’s Gate Bridge, from Stanley Park—one of Canada’s most-photographed landmarks (Photo: flyfshrmn98)

We’re loving the current series Globe & Mail on travel photography, including this week’s installment on how to take memorable landmark photos. Top takeaway: Go to a local souvenir shop and browse the postcards to “steal” ideas from the pros on how to angle your snapshot of a local landmark. (more…)

Teepee Camping—Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta

Submit your photo to our Flickr Group to see your favourite travel shot as part of our Photo Friday feature on Where.ca! We’ll credit you and link to your photo.

Why We Chose It

Have you ever seen so many stars? Getting away from it all is the name of the game at southern Alberta’s Waterton Lakes National Park, the quieter little sis to Glacier National Park in the U.S. The colours captured in the night sky over the Rockies is absolutely gorgeous here—patience is key as you wait for that moment right when the sun slips behind the ridge. It’s also genius to mirrors the slopes of the mountains with the peak of the teepee.

Photo: bcarlier