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Ottawa art

Comic Art in Large Scale

Mathew Reichertz's Garbage follows a man's interactions with his neighbours after a mysterious couch appears in front of his house. (Mathew Reichertz, Garbage, page 5 (2014), oil on Polystyrene, 8 x 6 feet. Courtesy of the artist; Mathew Reichertz, Garbage, Page 10 (2014), oil on Polystyrene, 8 x 6 feet. Courtesy of the artist.

Mathew Reichertz’s Garbage follows a man’s interactions with his neighbours after a mysterious couch appears in front of his house. (Mathew Reichertz, Garbage, page 5 (2014), oil on Polystyrene, 8 x 6 feet. Courtesy of the artist; Mathew Reichertz, Garbage, Page 10 (2014), oil on Polystyrene, 8 x 6 feet. Courtesy of the artist.)

The setting is a North Halifax neighbourhood. Leaving his house in the morning, a man discovers that a white couch has been placed anonymously on the curb outside his door, which sets off a series of encounters (some pleasant, other less so) with his neighbours. Mathew Reichertz’s Garbage, a large-scale comic book that blurs the line between narrative and art, explores the unhealthy relationships that sometimes occur within communities, and how simple communication can reveal the goodness in others. On display at the Carleton University Art Gallery until April 3. —Amy Allen
•Carleton University Art Gallery, St. Patrick’s Building, 1125 Colonel By Dr., 613-520-2120. cuag.carleton.ca
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Gallery Highlights Early Canadian Snapshots

Mirrors with Memory shines a light on early Canadian photography. (Thomas Coffin Doane, The Molson family brewery after the fire, Montreal, Quebec, 1858, daguerreotype, Library and Archives Canada.)

Mirrors with Memory shines a light on early Canadian photography. (Thomas Coffin Doane, The Molson family brewery after the fire, Montreal, Quebec, 1858, daguerreotype, Library and Archives Canada.)

Invented in the early 1800s, the daguerreotype is the prototype for photography as we know it today. Images were captured on a sheet of polished, silver-plated copper, allowing each detail to be preserved with pristine clarity. For the first time in history, humans could create images of themselves — and the world around them — as they really were. In Mirrors with Memory: Daguerreotypes from Library and Archives Canada, a series of landscapes and portraits of regular citizens open a window into Canada’s early days. On display at the National Gallery of Canada until February 28.
•National Gallery of Canada, 380 Sussex Dr., 613-990-1985. gallery.ca
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A Life in Pictures: nichola feldman-kiss

(nichola feldman-kiss, a yard of ashes, video still from after Africa, 2012, HD video triptych.  ©nichola feldman-kiss and CARCC, 2015.)

(nichola feldman-kiss, a yard of ashes, video still from after Africa, 2012, HD video triptych. ©nichola feldman-kiss and CARCC, 2015)

Identity, global conflict, and trauma — nichola feldman-kiss has explored these issues throughout her artistic practice, which spans well over two decades. Her latest exhibition, witness, traces the progression of her career, from her early examination of the artistic process to a 2012 trip to war-torn Sudan, which had a lasting influence on her work. The exhibition comprises three separate installations: childish objects, a collection of items that reflect feldman-kiss’s earliest thoughts about art; after Africa, a video triptych on the subject of geopolitical violence; and her latest work, between here and there, which explores issues surrounding the international bone trade. On display at Ottawa Art Gallery until Feb. 7, 2016. —Amy Allen
Ottawa Art Gallery, 2 Daly Ave., 613-233-8699. ottawaartgallery.ca
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Eight things to do the weekend of Nov. 12 to 15

BY AMY ALLEN AND NICOLINA LEONE

(Photo: Andrew Alexander)

In a double bill, (Off) Balance and Feelers tell two stories of women’s experiences in modern society. (Photo: Andrew Alexander)

Signatures Show
Signatures Show is one of the largest craft fairs in Ottawa, and more than 150 artisans come from the Ottawa region, Montreal, and Toronto to sell their stuff. Scented soaps and candles, upcycled clothes and accessories, whimsical art and stationery, tasty gourmet foods and cuddly children’s toys — Signatures has everything you need to find gifts made with love for everyone on your list. The show kicks off on Wednesday, Nov. 11 and continues until Sunday, Nov. 15. General admission is $10. Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr., signaturesottawa.ca.

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Celestial Sights at Karsh-Masson Gallery

(Jason Paradis, Lexington Kaleidoscope, 2013. Acrylic, ink, and spray-paint on 9 canvases with acrylic yarn, local stone, and plexiglas. (Detail) Miriam Woolfolk Gallery, Lexington Art League.)

(Jason Paradis, Lexington Kaleidoscope, 2013. Acrylic, ink, and spray-paint on 9 canvases with acrylic yarn, local stone, and plexiglas. (Detail) Miriam Woolfolk Gallery, Lexington Art League.)

The stars above us have been an important part of the night sky for millennia, and yet with present levels of light pollution, they’re difficult — sometimes impossible — to see. Artist Jason Paradis reminds us of their presence in his installation Ottawa Night, in which he anchors bundles of string to a pile of rocks on the floor and connects them to paintings on the wall in an imitation of the constellations that are visible from the gallery at night. The result? Arresting, 3-D rays of colour that evoke mystery and modernity alike. On display at the Karsh-Masson Gallery until November 29. —Amy Allen
•Karsh-Masson Gallery, 110 Laurier Ave. W., 613-580-2424 ext. 14167. ottawa.ca/arts
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Jaya Krishnan On Display

Jaya Krishnan’s latest exhibit is on display at The Michael Gennis Gallery.

The Michael Gennis Gallery showcases the works of Ottawa’s Jaya Krishnan, a painter with a unique artistic style that has garnered international recognition, in “The Essence of Visual Serenity: Here and There.”

Krishnan captures moments in time with the use of visually stunning colours and other elements such as light and shape. Now though December 9th, experience Krishnan’s latest exhibit that features the themes “Here” — referring to more familiar settings in Canada and Europe — and “There” — featuring works inspired by Krishnan’s journeys to South-east Asia.

Michael Gennis Gallery, 416 Richmond Rd. www.mgennisgallery.com.