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Nova Scotia

The Winter Feast

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Photo: Kelly Neil

The annual Savour celebration of Nova Scotian cuisine is a favourite with visitors and locals alike

By: Trevor J. Adams

 

Back for it’s 15th year, the Savour Food & Wine Festival is the year’s biggest celebration of Nova Scotia’s culinary scene. The festival brings together talented mixologists, innovative brewers, award-winning winemakers, and chefs aplenty, sharing their creations at several events.

“The Savour Food & Wine Festival has grown from a small show to a series of exciting events that captures the essence of the food and beverage culture in Nova Scotia,” says Gordon Stewart, executive director of the Restaurant Association of Nova Scotia, which organizes the event.

The festival starts with Dine Around (January 15 to March 15), a unique program that invites restaurants around Nova Scotia to showcase local products, with offerings ranging in price from $25 to $45. Dishes will be a mix of three course prix-fixe menus, plus small plates. At press time, participating Halifax restaurants include Gio, Durty Nelly’s, and The Stubborn Goat.

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On February 1, the Lord Nelson Hotel on South Park Street hosts the city’s definitive event for cocktail lovers: Imbibe. Nova Scotia’s top mixologists come together for one night to create 30+ sample-size cocktails, many showcasing local spirits and ingredients. Some 25 restaurants and bars are slated to take part.

Up next on February 8 at the Prince George Hotel on Market Street is Decadence, a unique tasting event pairing wines with delectable savoury dishes and luscious desserts. Discover how wine pairings enhance both the sweet and savoury creations crafted by Nova Scotian Community College (NSCC) Culinary Arts students. All dishes are designed and prepared by students of the Pastry Arts and Culinary Arts programs, under the direction of their chef-instructors.

The Rare & Fine Wine show at Casino Nova Scotia on Upper Water Street on February 16 is a must for serious wine aficionados. Sample top-scoring wines from Champagne, Bordeaux, Burgundy, Napa Valley, Piedmonte, Veneto, and Tuscany, amongst others. Relax to live jazz as you sample from our selection of 40+ wines, rated 90+ points by major wine publications—all available in Nova Scotia for the first time. Throughout the night, Bishop’s Cellar staff will be on hand to sell any wines you want to take home.

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Be among the first to visit the new Halifax Convention Centre on Argyle Street as it hosts the eponymous Savour Food & Wine Show on February 22. It showcases 100+ Nova Scotian restaurants and wine and beverage producers. Take in the evening and let your taste buds run wild as you explore samples of delectable foods, cocktails, and wine presented by Nova Scotia’s finest.

Capping the festival is the Craft Beer Cottage party on March 3 at the Halifax Seaport Farmers’ Market on Marginal Road. Sample beers from local and nearby craft breweries while you play summer games like washer toss, or chill in an Adirondack chair and enjoy the live music. There will be picnic tables and delicious beer-friendly food available for purchase. Ticket price includes unlimited beer samples.

Like a Postcard – Yarmouth, Nova Scotia

By BRITTANY HENDRY

"Looks Like a Postcard" by M.ann.n

“Looks Like a Postcard” by M.ann.n

WHY WE CHOSE IT
The name of this photo says it all. Perfectly displaying what Nova Scotia is known for, “Like a Postcard” accentuates natural rock cliffs, rolling green hills, blue skies and sparse clouds—all a flawless backdrop for Yarmouth County’s Cape Forchu Lightstation—also known as “the beacon to Canada.” This little piece of Nova Scotia makes us think of ocean spray, delightful Atlantic breezes and wistful summer days. Fun fact: there is an outcrop of the ancient supercontinent Gondwana located at Cape Forchu.

Submit your photo to our Flickr Group and we will consider it for publication in our Photo Friday series on Where.ca! We’ll credit you and link to your image.

 

12 Quintessential Canadian Road Trips

By SHANNON KELLY

Trans Canada Highway, Alberta (Photo: Gord McKenna)

It’s time to think about planning your summer vacation, and if the open road is what you’re craving, Canada—with its stunning scenery and wide open natural beauty—has plenty of options. In fact, one of our best drives, the Banff-to-Jasper route (see Icefields Parkway) in the Rockies, was included in National Geographic’s Drives of a Lifetime book.

Start the slideshow of quintessential Canadian road trips »

Canada’s 10 Best Island Holiday Destinations

By KAT TANCOCK

Cape Breton Island (Photo: Nova Scotia Tourism)

When we think of island vacations, the tropical always springs to mind: hot sun, sand, flip-flops and a fruity drink with an umbrella. But Canada has islands on offer, too, with a lot more to attract visitors than you might think. Here are 10 picks to consider for your next vacation.

Start the slideshow of top island destinations »

Eastern Canada’s Best Beaches

By SHANNON KELLY

Kelly’s Beach, Kouchibouguac Park, NB (Photo: Tourism New Brunswick)

Last week the west coast got all the beachy glory. Now we head east to focus on the top beaches in the east: sandy Maritime playgrounds, windswept dunes, surfer spots and crystalline beauties on eastern Canada’s ocean- and lake-fronts. (more…)

19 of Canada’s Most Unusual Museums

by CARISSA BLUESTONE

Canada’s Most Unusual Museums: the world-famous Gopher Hole Museum (Photo: Colin Smith)

Did you know that Vancouver has an entire museum devoted to corkscrews, that diehard Anne Murray fans can devour every detail of her life and record a CD with her in Nova Scotia, or that a tiny town called Vulcan in the Alberta Prairies is home to a Star Trek–themed tourist “station”? From the über-Canadian to the downright kooky, these unusual, one-of-a-kind and just plain weird museums earn the moniker “cabinet of curiosities”.

Start the slideshow of Canada’s most unusual museums »

12 Memorable East Coast Fishing Villages

By ALINA SEAGAL

Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia (Photo: Alina Seagal)

An adventure through Atlantic Canada is not complete until you visit a fishing village or two. Here, you’ll find the freshest seafood, a new lifestyle and some stunning coastal views. Marvel at the postcard views of Peggy’s Cove, walk along the ocean floor during incredibly low tides around Alma or simply head to the village known internationally for its tasty oysters. Hundreds of fishing settlements dot the East Coast, yet we’ve selected some of the most memorable ones for you to see. (more…)

Seaside Cove—Near Halifax, Nova Scotia

Submit your photo to our Flickr Group to see your favourite travel shot as part of our Photo Friday feature on Where.ca! We’ll credit you and link to your photo.

Why We Chose It

We admit we haven’t pinpointed exactly where this was taken (if you know, drop us a line), but it’s a perfect representation of the many coves and inlets along Nova Scotia’s Atlantic coast. The vintage effect used, with the washed-out colours, works well here, since you can image this scene hasn’t changed much in the past thirty or forty years. The effect also reinforces the entire sleepy fishing village mood. It doesn’t hurt that the photographer framed everything expertly, creating a beautiful path for the eyes through the water to the ocean.

Photo: Wade Kelly

New UNESCO World Heritage Site: Nova Scotia’s Grand Pré

The historic church at Grand Pré (Photo: H. Holm, Nova Scotia Photo Album)

Every year, UNESCO adds sites of cultural or natural importance to its World Heritage List. This year’s new UNESCO World Heritage sites include 25 places, among them a species-rich coral reef system in Palau, the supposed birthplace of Jesus in Palestine, and Nova Scotia’s own historic Acadian settlement of Grand Pré, which is a Canadian national historic site.

Founded in the 17th century, Grand Pré was a farming community that used a unique hydraulic drainage system to work the marshy land that is affected by the world’s highest tides in the nearby Bay of Fundy. Archaelogical remnants of the original village of Grand Pré can still be seen here, though the majority of the Acadian community was exiled beginning in 1755 in what is known as the Grand Dérangement, or Great Expulsion.

Grand Pré is Nova Scotia’s third UNESCO World Heritage site. Others are the historic maritime village of Lunenburg and the Joggins Fossil Cliffs palaeontological site.

East Coast Beer and Breweries: A Historic Maritime Tradition

By ALINA SEAGAL

Garrison Brewing Company in Halifax (Photo: Nicole Bratt)

Canada’s east coasters love their beer and it shows. The Martimes region is famous for its historic breweries and has been producing the delicious amber drink since the early 19th century. It has given the rest of Canada notable brands Alexander Keith’s and Moosehead. Jason Foster, a CBC beer columnist, insists that Atlantic Canada has developed a unique beer personality that is essentially British in balance and fruitiness, to reflect local history and culture. (more…)

The 12 Best Seafood Towns in Canada from Atlantic to Pacific

By SHANNON KELLY

Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia (Photo: Chris Boris)

From Atlantic to Pacific, a dozen of the best places across Canada to tuck into local lobster, oysters, mussels and fresh fish. (more…)

Iconic Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse Could Be Demolished

By SHANNON KELLY

Photo: Lou Bueno

One of Nova Scotia’s most photographed sights and top tourist attractions (it receives 500,000 tourists per year) may be lost forever if a community group doesn’t step in to save it from demolition before the end of May. (more…)