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Nicholas Metivier Gallery

Hot Art: Ric Evans Draws Inspiration from Rocks

Ric Evans' Instrument Set at Nicholas Metivier Gallery

MAY 24 TO JUNE 16 Colour, shape, texture, space; these are among the foundational tools of painting, and Ric Evans wields them with equal parts creativity and discipline. This month the Toronto artist, one of the country’s preeminent practitioners of geometric abstraction, presents his most recent works at Nicholas Metivier Gallery. Though true to a style honed by Evans over more than three decades, these latest canvases and shaped-panel pieces—such as Instrument Set—strike an almost naturalistic tone, inspired as they are by the rugged yet ever-detailed landscapes of northern Ontario.

Weekend Roundup: January 6-8

Friday: Demar DeRozan looks to lead the Raptors to a third straight victory

Friday, January 6
The NBA lockout finally concluded on Christmas day, the shortened basketball season is starting to pick up and our hometown Raptors are on a two-game winning streak. Cheer them on tonight as they take on the New Jersey Nets (including former “Mr. Kardishian” Kris Humphries) at the Air Canada Centre.

The Next Stage Theatre Festival is back for another year at Factory Theatre. The festival’s first weekend features top independent stage shows including The Tiki Bikini Beach Paradise Party A-Go-Go! and Living with Henry.

Drama meets punk rock as Broadway smash American Idiot continues its short-term run at the Toronto Centre for the Arts. Featuring tunes such as “Wake Me Up When September Ends” and “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” from Green Day’s Grammy-winning album, this contemporary musical is not to be missed.

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Contact Curated: Downtown

This year’s Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival features exhibitions at more than 200 venues across the city. Make the most of your festival experience by concentrating your gallery-hopping within specific Toronto neighbourhoods, such as the Downtown core.

At the Design Exchange: Guy Tillim's Apartment building, Avenue Bagamoyo, Beira, Mozambique (courtesy of Kuckei + Kuckei, Berlin and Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg)

Design Exchange
Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba (April 20 to June 14)

Another of Contact’s highly anticipated primary exhibitions, Tillim’s Avenue Patrice Lumumba series examines the effects of colonialism on modern history and architecture in African nations like Mozambique, Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

University of Toronto Art Centre
Suzy Lake: Political Poetics (May 3 to June 25)

Over the past 40 years, artist Suzy Lake has captured and expressed the female identity within the political, social and media context. She was also one of the forerunners of body-based photography. Lake’s exhibit at the University of Toronto Art Centre touches themes like beauty, femininity and identity.

Art Gallery of Ontario
Abel Boulineau: “Where I was born…”: A Photograph, A Clue, and the Discovery of Abel Boulineau (March 5 to August 21)

This series of gelatin silver photo prints in the Art Gallery of Ontario’s collection was only recently discovered to be part of Boulineau’s portfolio. A painter by trade, the French artist’s photographs reveal the stillness of everyday rural from 1897 to 1916.

At the ROM: Edward Burtynsky's SOCAR Oil Fields #9, Baku, Azerbaijan (courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery)

Royal Ontario Museum
Edward Burtynsky: Oil (April 9 to July 3)

The Royal Ontario Museum’s Institute for Contemporary Culture presents internationally renowned Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky’s collection of 53 large-format photographs, which explore the ugly reality of the oil industry and oil dependence in contemporary society.

First Canadian Place
Dr. Roberta Bondar: Within the Landscape—Art Respecting Life (April 4 to May 20)

Using artistic elements like line, texture and colour, this exhibition offers a look at diversity of patterns in nature viewed at a distance—for example, a herd of buffalo moving across a plain, shot from above by the first Canadian woman ever to travel to outer space.

Nicholas Metivier Gallery
Edward Burtynsky: Monegros (May 5 to 28)

Depicting the complex and diverse landscape of Monegros, Spain, this collection of large-format Burtynsky photographs explores the effects of industrial farming in the region.

Toronto Imageworks Gallery
Dianne Davis: Impervious (May 5 to June 4)

Davis’s works utilize tableaus and subjects that tell the story of a specific place and time to examine notions of fragility, transience and the brevity of life.

At Bau-Xi Photo: Brett Gundlock's yntitled image from his Home series

Bau-Xi Photo
Rafal Gerszak, Brett Gundlock, Jonathan Taggart, Aaron Vincent Elkaim and Ian Willms: Boreal Collective (April 30 to May 13)

The Boreal Collective features the work of young photojournalists who document social, psychological and physical inequities through Canadian-based narratives.

Leo Kamen Gallery
Roberto Pellegrinuzzi: Constellations (April 30 to May 28)

What you see isn’t what you get with Pellegrinuzzi. In this exhibition, each layered, translucent photo offers an atypical way of viewing a landscape.

TIFF Bell Lightbox
Creative & Technical Team, Pearl Chen, Meagan Durlak, Matthew Fabb, Priam Givord, Brandon Hocura and Ana Serrano: Becoming What We Behold: A CFC Media Lab Project (May 7 to 29)

This interactive installation features a geometric web of tablet computers showcasing user-generated content. Viewers become artists as they upload images and share photos in the literal web of interconnectivity that’s meant to mimic social media.

Gallery 44
Surendra Lawoti: Don River (April 30 to June 4)

Chris Boyne: Stillwater (April 30 to June 4)
Susan Kordalewski: Space vs. Place (April 30 to June 4)

The three exhibitions at Gallery 44 study landscape and place in various contexts. The first, by Lawoti, focuses on locals and displaced residents living in and around the Don River Valley in the midst of urban Toronto. On the other hand, Boyne’s works depict unseemingly colourful landscapes with dark histories told through audio narratives. Lastly, Kordalewski’s photos play with one’s sense of perception by placing 2D representations within 3D spaces.

At Birch Libralato: Lee Goreas's The Happy Hooker (courtesy of Birch Libralato)

Birch Libralato
Lee Goreas: New Works 2011 (April 30 to June 4)
James Nizam: Memorandoms (April 30 to June 4)

Lee Goreas uses golf balls to create a series of large portraits that demonstrate the “character” of ordinary objects—form, colour, surface and age reveal each ball’s unique history. In Memorandoms, photographer James Nizam takes viewers inside the oldest public housing development in Vancouver, just before it was demolished. Using leftover objects like doors, drawers and shelves, he re-creates a sense of place with a fleeting identity.

KWT Contemporary
Caitlin Cronenberg, David Frankovich: RED / Plus de Deux (May 5 to 28)

Using images selected from the New York Times’ Canadian Photography Archive, Cronenberg’s series at KWT Contemporary reimagines and reinvents the photos as a commentary on how Americans have viewed Canadian culture in the past.

Textile Museum of Canada
Peter Wilkins: Loop (April 29 to June 12)

Concerned with “pattern languages” in urban settings, Wilkins’ exhibition transforms man-made objects and structures into abstract geometric patterns through repetition and reflection.


View Contact Photography Festival 2011: Downtown in a larger map

*All images courtesy of the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival unless otherwise noted.

Weekend Roundup, September 17 to 19

Though fall is approaching, the fun doesn’t stop! Toronto still hosts plenty of events both indoors and out to ensure a memorable weekend!

Be amused and amazed by Banana Shpeel this weekend.

Friday, September 17
Step into the Art Gallery of Ontario to see the just-opened exhibition Shary Boyle: Flesh and Blood. Almost 30 of the award-winning artist’s playful yet unsettling works are on display.

Get an artist’s perspective on one of the worst environmental disasters of our time—Nicholas Metivier Gallery presents Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest series of images, this time of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Also on display are Polaroid photos taken by Burtynsky in the ship-breaking yards of Bangladesh.

Immerse yourself in South American culture at Harbourfront Centre as the Vibrant Colombia Dispora Festival kicks off a weekend of family fun. Activities tonight include exhibitions of Colombian art plus performances by marimba player Louis Bianco and the Ballet Raices de Colombia.

Saturday, September 18
Prog rock fans, take note: Former Pink Floyd frontman Roger Waters takes to the Air Canada Centre stage tonight to commemorate the 30th anniversary of his band’s classic album, The Wall.

An even heavier rock experience awaits at the Molson Canadian Amphitheatre, thanks to ’90s grunge band Alice in Chains. The Grammy-nominated trio is sure to riff on its back catalogue and perform tracks from their latest album, Black Gives Way to Blue.

Step back in time at Black Creek Pioneer Village’s annual Pioneer Festival. This historic site celebrates the autumn harvest numerous old-timey events and activities, including horse-drawn wagon rides, cider-making demonstrations, a spelling bee, a popular quilt auction and international music and dance performances.

Sunday, September 19
Prepare to laugh, smile and gasp with Cirque du Soleil’s Banana Shpeel at the Canon Theatre! At this unique spectacle, death-defying acrobatic acts are paired with vaudeville-style slapstick comedy from quirky characters.

Help some talented local musicians bring the Summer Music in the Garden series of classical concerts to a close. Beneath the boughs of the Toronto Music Garden, Shauna and Friends perform a variety of chamber music compositions for strings.

Take in the ever-popular Queen West Art Crawl, featuring numerous local galleries and artists—more than 500 of whom will be displaying their colourful works at Trinity Bellwoods Park.

Contact Photo: Daily View #2

The Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival—the world’s largest festival dedicated to the display and discussion of the photographic arts—returns to Toronto this month. There are more than 225 exhibitions to see between May 1 and 31; each day Where Toronto offers a peek at one of them.

Today’s Pick:

Artist: Carlos & Jason Sanchez
Title: Gas Chamber #1 (courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery)

See It @ the Nicholas Metivier Gallery, April 29 to May 22.

For more on this exhibition, click here.

Weekend Bonus: The City’s Biggest Art Show

OCTOBER 22 to 26 Whatever the weather, you’ll want to head indoors this weekend to join thousands of art lovers—both amateurs and aficionados—at the annual Toronto International Art Fair. This highly anticipated event brings together artists and galleries from around the world for an outstanding exhibition and sale of contemporary visual imagery. Visitors have the opportunity to view and purchase pieces from one hundred galleries representing twelve different countries. Take in (and, if your cheque book can bear it, take home) original sculptures, limited-edition prints and photographs, and fine paintings from such Toronto hot spots as Christopher Cutts Gallery, Clark and Faria and Nicholas Metivier Gallery.  This special ten-year anniversary edition of the expo also features a variety of installations and curatorial projects celebrating the evolution of Canadian artwork—the flagship “Heartland” display reflects the growing strength and diversity of Canadian art, while the fair’s Next Lounge showcases works from cutting-edge emerging artists. Metro Toronto Convention Centre, $18; call 1 800-663-4173 or navigate here for more information.

Click an image below to see some Toronto galleries’ offerings at this year’s Toronto International Art Fair.

October Editor’s Picks: Art

A panel from Charles Pachter's <em>Hockey Knights in Canada</em> (photo by Carlton Parker).

A panel from Charles Pachter's Hockey Knights in Canada.

ON NOW To outsiders, the fanaticism with which Canadians embrace the game of hockey may be hard to understand; conversely, the sport is so ingrained in our collective identity that we rarely stop to question it. Attempting to find meaning in this fixation, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art presents ARENA: Road Game, a group show featuring Hockey Knights in Canada by Charles Pachter, plus related works by an artistic all-star team including Graeme Patterson and Tim Lee. No mere paean to a national pastime, the exhibition offers a deeper examination of hockey’s significance in contemporary culture, touching on everything from notions of hero worship to the controversial role of violence on the ice.

<em>Laterns, Singapore</em> by Nicolas Ruel (courtesy of Thompson Landry Gallery).

Laterns, Singapore by Nicolas Ruel.

TO OCTOBER 18 Quebec artists continue to gain an audience in Ontario courtesy of the Distillery Historic District’s beautiful Thompson Landry Gallery. Yet, in a sense, the gallery’s latest exhibition has an international flavour, as Montreal-based photographer Nicolas Ruel presents 8 Secondes, a new series of images that depict the world’s great cities through multiple eight-second exposures. Evoking a dreamlike dynamism, these photos are all the more impressive for being printed on stainless steel—the medium’s light-reflecting surface lends further animation to the already vital works.

Edward Burtynsky's <em>SOCAR Oil Fields #3, Baku, Azerbaijan</em>.

Edward Burtynsky's SOCAR Oil Fields #3, Baku, Azerbaijan.

OCTOBER 8 TO 31 Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky has long been renowned for capturing the almost unimaginable scale of heavy industry’s impact on the natural environment. His sweeping images of manufactured landscapes—at once striking and repulisive—are widely collected and have been the subject of essays, books and even a documentary film. At Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s vision is distilled in an exhibition focusing on his decade-long study of oil fields and refineries from Alberta to Azerbaijan. Through these meticulously composed images, he depicts the visual duality—and implies the moral one—arising from our continuing exploitation of a resource that is equally valued and maligned.