• eat
  • shop
  • see
  • go
  • stay
  • daytrip
  • map
  • calendar
  • transport
  • weather
  • currency
  • tofrom

Manitoba

Top 5 Rooftop Patios

Stella's Cafe & Bakery. Photo by Dustin Leader.

Stella’s Cafe & Bakery. Photo by Dustin Leader.

Besides food, the best way to a Winnipegger’s heart is the word “patio”. These spots take it to the next level—literally—with rooftop spaces to dine al fresco.

Local favourite Stella’s Cafe & Bakery has 8 locations across the city, and the newest, on Pembina Highway, boasts a sweet rooftop patio. Go at dusk when the cafe lights come on and cast a romantic glow over quinoa dragon bowls and plates of Scandinavian gravlax.

  • 1463 Pembina Hwy, 204‑275‑2001

Tucked among the treetops, The Roost‘s intimate rooftop setting gives a bird’s eye view on bustling Corydon Avenue. Clever and complex craft cocktails and elegant small plates have us crowing.

  • 651 Corydon, 204‑414‑9313

Cravings for pub grub and powerful frozen margaritas are sated on Tavern United‘s sleek patio. Get an unbeatable view of downtown’s SHED (sports, hospitality, and entertainment district) and watch ground being broken on the new True North Square.

  • 260 Hargrave, 204‑944‑0022

Learn what Dean Martin was crooning about while dining outdoors at Pasquale’s. The St. Boniface area restaurant has a secluded rooftop patio perfect for winding down with a glass of wine and a hearty plate of lasagne.

  • 109 Marion St, 204‑231-1403

Take in an iconic Winnipeg intersection from above at Confusion Corner Bar and Grill. The smoky barbeque chicken pizza, drizzled in tangy bourbon barbeque sauce, is a prime patio pick.

  • 500 Corydon Ave, 204‑284‑6666

Artist Spotlight: Peter Sawatzky

Peter Sawatsky courtesy of Loch Gallery

Peter Sawatsky courtesy of Loch Gallery

Peter Sawatzky is an award-wining Manitoba artist who has earned international recognition for his lifelike bronze sculptures. A country boy raised in Southern Manitoba, Peter’s passion evolved from watching wildlife and birds into a career of carving these animals.

Inspiration for Peter comes from field drawings made during his many years of observing and studying animal movements. These sketches are eventually transformed into life size sculptures that can reach up to 29 feet long. The foundry process—from creating a metal frame to the empty shell being filled with bronze—can take up to a year depending on the size of the piece.

Sawatzky_2016CougarBust_web

Peter’s sculptures have become iconic Winnipeg landmarks, like the sculpture of James A. Richardson at the Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport, the monument of a mother polar bear and her cubs outside the Assiniboine Park Zoo, or “Seal River Crossing,” which stands at the city’s famed Portage and Main intersection. The impressive statue, which captures a herd of caribou crossing the Seal River, was inspired by a scene Peter saw from above while travelling to Churchill. While on the flight, he started to sketch the caribou and knew he had his next piece. The project, which took four years to complete, was commissioned by James Richardson & Sons Ltd. in commemoration of its 150th anniversary.

In addition to his public art, more than 25 pieces of Peter’s work are on display at the Loch Gallery in May and June.

More Hot Art:

Where to See Public Art in Winnipeg
Artist Spotlight: Wanda Koop
5 Winnipeg Architecture Marvels
Artist Spotlight: Michel Saint Hilaire

Walk, Bike, Run: 5 Ways to Get Moving in Winnipeg This Summer

So you’ve discovered Winnipeg’s incredible outdoor attractions and you’re looking for more ways to get outside and get moving. Have no fear! These fun tours and activities make getting active and exploring the city easy.

walking paths

ROUTES ON THE RED

A collection of self-directed walking, biking, and paddling tours along the Red River. Put yourself in the shoes of a voyageur and try out a half-day walking tour that follows the paths of the historic fur trade. Routes and maps found on routesonthered.ca

THE LOOP

Get a crash course on the city by walking this 3.5 hour self directed route that covers Winnipeg’s significant historic, cultural, and architectural sites. Download the route map at tourismwinnipeg.com

BEE2GETHER BIKE RENTALS

Find a willing partner and take to the streets on a bicycle built for two. Bee2Gether’s cute yellow campers can be found at The Forks and Assiniboine Park, with tandem, single rider, buggy, and surry bikes for rent. Visit bee2getherbikes.com or call 204‑298‑2925 for more information.

EXCHANGE DISTRICT BIZ WALKING TOURS

The entire Exchange District neighbour-hood is designated a National Historic Site, and there’s plenty of history to explore. Tours with themes like “Death and Debauchery” bring to light the dark secrets of Winnipeg’s early years—when it earned the nickname “the wickedest city in the Dominion”. Call 204-942-6716 to book.

DOWNTOWN BIKE TOURS

Pig out and get active at the same time on the Downtown Winnipeg BIZ’s Moveable Feast tour. Diners bike between 5 restaurant stops to sample eats at the neighbourhood’s prime restaurants. Visit downtownwinnipegtours.com to book.

More Ways to Explore Winnipeg:

Journey to Churchill at the Assiniboine Park Zoo
What to Expect at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Walk in Louis Riel’s Footsteps
Free Things To Do in Winnipeg

Discover Secrets at 7 Incredible Winnipeg Attractions

By Joelle Kidd

Though it is the province’s largest city, Winnipeg has plenty of green space. Immerse yourself in nature and discover the secrets of Winnipeg’s outdoor attractions.

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy.

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy.

PLAYING WITH POLAR BEARS

For up close animal sightings, the Journey to Churchill Exhibit at Assiniboine Park zoo is the place to be. The main draw is a chance to come face to face with a swimming polar bear, separated by only 15 cm of polymer. This massive exhibit covers 3,714 square metres, and is home to caribou, muskox, snowy owls, arctic foxes, and, of course, seals and polar bears, whose aqueous environments are constructed side by side to encourage interaction—buffered by another polymer wall of course.

The secret to catching polar bears at play is to visit in the morning when the animals are most active. Arrive before 11 am to get the best view of the bears frolicking and swimming. The bears’ underwater enclosure is placed over a tunnel, called the Sea Ice Passage, so the curious can get an up close look at bear bellies swimming above. Get your phone ready; you’ll want to snap a selfie when a polar bear comes to check out the crowd.

  • Assiniboine Park, 2595 Roblin Blvd, 204‑927-6000

Learn more about Journey to Churchill

Courtesy Travel Manitoba

Courtesy Travel Manitoba

JUST AROUND THE RIVER BEND

Winnipeg grew out of the meeting place at the Red and Assiniboine Rivers, as these waterways made trade and travel much easier. Though planes, trains, and automobiles have superseded birch bark canoes in modern days, it is still possible to take to the river by boat for a new perspective on the city. Splash Dash Boat Tours and Rentals opens mid-May, sending river adventurers off from its perch at The Forks. Take a guided river tour and hear historical insights on points of interest along the way. When the water is calm, canoe rentals are available for those who want to paddle the Assiniboine.

  • Main dock at The Forks Historic Port, 204‑783‑6633

Where to shop while at The Forks

Photo by Ian Carter.

Photo by Ian Carter.

AU NATUREL

FortWhyte Alive is a haven for adventurous outdoor fun and environmental education, all within city limits. Paddle or go fishing on one of five lakes, walk through the wetlands on a floating boardwalk, and hike the trails that wind through surrounding aspen forest. Eco-explorers can learn about Manitoba wildlife at the site’s interpretive centre, but the best way to get up close and personal is on a bison safari—throughout May and June, buggies roll out on Thursdays at 1:30 pm to join the herd of huge hairy bison that live on the prairie.

If visiting in May, you’re just in time to catch the spring migration. Join a weekly Birding and Breakfast event to take a hike led by experienced birding guides and compare finds over pancakes at the on site Buffalo Stone Cafe.

Photo by Dan Harper.

Photo by Dan Harper.

TIME CAPSULE

It almost seems as though time has turned back to 1815 … until someone pulls out a smartphone to snap a pic of the blacksmith at work. Other than its visitors, everything at Fort Gibraltar is meticulously reproduced and restored, from costumed interpreters that explain the ins and outs of the fur trade on the prairies to the cabins filled with bundles of animal pelts.

Take a tour of the Fort to learn more about the daily life of early settlers and voyageurs from the North West Company.

Want more St Boniface history? Follow the Louis Riel walking tour

Photo courtesy of Thermea.

Photo courtesy of Thermea.

SOAK UP SOME SUN

Getting outside doesn’t necessarily mean getting active—sometimes all one needs is some fresh air and sun. The perfect place to spend a day outdoors and horizontal is Nordic-style spa Thermëa, an outdoor oasis cradled unexpectedly in an old Winnipeg residential neighbourhood.

Deep relaxation involves cycling through treatments of heat, cold, and rest. First, a toxin-clearing sit in a sauna, steam room, or hot bath, then a dip in the cold or temperate pool, followed by a period of relaxation. After a soak in the luxurious outdoor baths, journey out to the “Forest Beach”, a secluded rest area filled with loungers, Adirondack chairs, and comfy hammocks, all tucked in a lush grove of trees—the city will seem miles away.

  • 775 Crescent Dr, 1‑855‑284‑3344

See a full list of Winnipeg’s best spas and salons

MLL Heritage Wall at Upper Fort Garry Park. Photo by Pattern Interactive.

MLL Heritage Wall at Upper Fort Garry Park. Photo by Pattern Interactive.

WILD WALL

Upper Fort Garry was an important centre of the fur trade for the Hudson’s Bay Company in the late 1800s, and though only the Fort’s gate remains standing today, the recently completed Upper Fort Garry Park commemorates the site with historical markers and an interactive installation set along the site of the fort’s original wall. The Heritage Wall spans more than 400 feet and depicts the history of this land from First Nations communities to the fur trade and European settlement. Watch the wall light up with an artistic LED interpretation of the Metis buffalo hunt—come at dusk for the best view.

For total tech integration, download the park’s smartphone app which highlights points of interest and provides information on the symbols on the Heritage Wall. Historical facts hidden around the park turn each visit into a scavenger hunt.

Learn how tech integration sets the Canadian Museum for Human Rights apart

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy

A WALK IN THE PARK

Assiniboine Park, the city’s largest urban park, becomes a hotbed of activity in the spring and summer months. Beautiful blooms grow in the English gardens and Leo Mol sculpture garden, which also displays bronze figures created by the renowned artist. With winding paths and benches set in shady nooks, these gardens are a perfect place to while away the afternoon. Those itching to get active can start up an impromptu game of frisbee or fly a kite on the park’s manicured lawns.

The best way to take a tour of the park is to hop on board the miniature train that has been operating, run by the same family, for more than 50 years. This little locomotive runs daily from noon to 6 pm, and for $3 will take you on a spin around the park’s perimeter.

MORE WINNIPEG ATTRACTIONS

Winnipeg’s Best Shopping Districts
Why the RBC Convention Centre is a Destination in Itself
Best New Restaurants 2016
Where to Shop Downtown

Hot Art: May & June

Exhibits worth seeking out during your stay.

Dove with Olive Branch by pablo picasso, 1962, lithograph on paper. 55.1 x 75.6 cm. From the collection of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, 2007-067. Photographer: Stephen Topfer ©Picasso Estate/SODRAC(2016)

Dove with Olive Branch by pablo picasso, 1962, lithograph on paper. 55.1 x 75.6 cm. From the collection of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, 2007-067. Photographer: Stephen Topfer ©Picasso Estate/SODRAC(2016)

PICTURING PICASSO

STARTS MAY 13

A pair of exhibits give a rare glimpse at one of art history’s most iconic figures at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. Picasso in Canada features more than 30 paintings, watercolours, drawings, prints and ceramic works drawn from collections across the country. Also on display is a collection of 100 etchings and drypoints, presented in its entirety for the first time in 60 years. Named Picasso: Man and Beast, this exhibit showcases the artist’s preoccupations with the civilizing nature of art and the “beast within”. Winnipeg Art Gallery, 300 Memorial Blvd, wag.ca

Lakeside Ritual (bc) by Matthew Gardiner, 2013, courtesy of aceartinc

Lakeside Ritual (bc) by Matthew Gardiner, 2013, courtesy of aceartinc

OTHER EXHIBITS

MAY-JUN: Graffiti Gallery presents a retrospective featuring works by artists involved with the gallery since its inception in 1998. 109 Higgins Ave, graffitigallery.ca
TO MAY 19: Matthew Gardiner explores modern society’s relationship with the natural world in You Can’t Go Home Again at aceartinc. 290 McDermot Ave, aceart.org
TO MAY 28: Through the Eyes of A Child exhibits the work of young artists at WAG@The Park inside the Assiniboine Park Pavilion. 55 Pavilion Cres, wag.ca
TO MAY 30:
Love of gardening and painting runs in the family for Gerd Behrendt and Angela Lillico. See Floral Frenzy: The Love of Father and Daughter at the Wayne Arthur Gallery. 186 Provencher Blvd, waynearthurgallery.com
MAY 5-28: The MAWA (Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art) Artist Mothers Group shows a mother-child collaborative exhibit. 611 Main St, mawa.ca
MAY 5-16: See Sari Habiluk’s The Golden Hour, a collection of vibrant and abstracted acrylic paintings, at cre8ery. 125 Adelaide St, cre8ery.com
JUN 2-28: Turqoise Gem/Pale Blue Dot is a collection of mixed media works by Bonnie Taylor at the Wayne Arthur Gallery. 186 Provencher Blvd, waynearthurgallery.com


More Things To Do in Winnipeg:

Here & Now: Must-see and Do Activities During Your Stay
Why You Need to Visit the Canadian Museum for Human Rights
All About Winnipeg’s Convention Centre
Winnipeg’s Top 10 Selfie Spots

What to Expect at Winnipeg’s Gorgeous Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

By Joelle Kidd

With stunning architecture, a strong mandate, and an eye towards a future of purpose and hope, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights is leading the charge for human rights education.

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Rights for All

Entering into the cool, dark belly of the CMHR feels like the beginning of a journey. This is intentional. Architect Antoine Predock took painstaking care to integrate the building into the land, incorporating elements such as concrete stained the colour of Red River clay, and more than 50 species of indigenous tall grass prairie planted on either side of the building’s concrete “roots”. A massive screen displays video of silhouetted figures writing ‘welcome’ in 36 different languages. Nearby, a fossilized footprint discovered during an archeological dig of the museum’s site in 2008 reinforces this ground’s status as an historical meeting  place; this particular moccasin print is 750 years old.

It’s an impressive start to a visit, one that shows the care taken with every detail in the vast museum. The philosophy is holistic: from the building’s design to individual exhibits, every part of the experience points back to a mandate based around promoting greater understanding of human rights and prompting reflection and dialogue.

The CMHR marks a new generation of museum, one that promotes interaction and hands-on learning, that doesn’t shy away from technology, and is more interested in posing questions than loading visitors up with facts. This is not to say the museum is lacking in material: more than 100 hours of video, 250 artifacts and works of art (including 10 original art pieces), 2,543 images, and 100,000 words of original text are packed into the mammoth space.

Luckily — you guessed it — there’s an app for that. The experience-enriching application is free to download, full of content like an audio tour for self-guided wandering, the ability to sense nearby exhibits, a ‘mood meter’ that allows visitors to rate how they’re feeling and take the temperature of every gallery, and a GPS overlay that adds “hotspots” to a camera’s view of the Winnipeg skyline, pointing out additional attractions in the city.

Moving through the galleries is a conceptual journey from darkness to light, following criss-crossing ramps of backlit Spanish alabaster from the shady entranceway to the sun-dappled Garden of Contemplation, a basalt stone space offering respite and reflection, and up to the glass-walled Tower of Hope, the brilliant panoramic sweep of which symbolizes the impact of changing one’s perspective. Along the way, multimedia exhibits challenge, educate, and inspire. Global events, historic documents, deeply personal stories, and powerful works of art all share the space, providing a deep, rich, and multifaceted view of human rights. Without shying away from the past, the museum points to a better future, highlighting human resilience and ingenuity in the fight for all people to be recognized as free and equal.

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

What You’ll See

The Stories

Lean about historical and contemporary human rights issues through powerful personal stories.
Racial segregation in Canada. A collection of documents and a recreation of a 1940s movie house pay tribute to Viola Desmond, a black Nova Scotian woman who was arrested after sitting in the white-only section of a segregated movie theatre.
Holocaust survivor. Sigi Wasserman, like thousands of Jewish children in Germany, was sent along to Great Britain to escape the Nazis.
Inspiring youth. Craig Kielburger began advocating against child labour when he was only 12 years old. He went on to create an international charity, Free The Children, and the We Day initiative.
A singing activist.
Read about the life of First Nations singer/songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie, hear one of her songs, and see the Oscar she won for her song, “Up Where We Belong”.
Lifting the veil. See Quebec artist Andreanne Paquet’s photo exhibit of Muslim women wearing the hijab, which aims to promote understanding and express freedom of choice.

The Artifacts

Keep an eye out for these fascinating items on display.
A ballot box. This unassuming object has historical significance as the box that held the votes cast in South Africa’s 1994 election, in which Nelson Mandela was elected president.
Suitcases. See luggage belonging to Japanese Canadians interred in camps during World War II.
The world’s largest Metis beaded artwork. This record-holder stands 18 feet tall, made by artist Jennine Krauchi with thousands of antique beads dating back to the fur-trade era.
The Proclamation of the Constitution Act of 1982. The original document, signed by Queen Elizabeth II and Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, enshrines Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
A red prom dress. Worn by Mareisha Rucker, who organized her school’s first integrated prom in Wilcox, Georgia, in 2013.

The Technology

Try out these high tech interactive activities.
The circular basket theatre. An original film exploring Indigenous conceptions of rights and responsibilities plays on a 360 degree screen inside a theatre made from ‘woven’ wood.
Interactive table game. This digital exhibit reacts to shadows of visitors’ hands passing over it.
Lights of Inclusion floor game. A motion sensor tracks movements with colourful spotlights that merge and tremble when visitors interact.
Interactive study table. This long, touch screen table contains information and images about 16 atrocities from around the world.
Digital canvas. A 95-foot canvas in the Canadian Journeys gallery plays silent films that tell individual stories of human rights.

Visitor Information

Visit the Canadian Museum for Human Rights website for admission prices and hours. 90 minute guided tours are available, as well as self-guided audio tours for mobile device from the App Store or Google Play. 3-4 hours are recommended to delve into the CMHR’s massive array of content.

More Winnipeg Attractions:

Where to Shop on Corydon

20151117_123345_resized

Courtesy of Radiance Gifts.

One of Winnipeg’s most vibrant ‘hoods, Corydon Avenue offers a cultural mix of shopping and dining from around the world, with trend-setting boutiques, specialty stores and restaurants catering to the cool and hip.

Start a spree at Radiance Gifts for beautiful salt lamps, and dazzling crystals like smoky quartz. Zen out with a collection of books on chakras and essential oils. radiancegifts.com

Across the street at Peepers Swimwear, find colourful bathing suits perfect for a winter getaway, with brands like Speedo and Roxy. peepersswimwear.com

For natural and fair trade goods, visit Humboldt’s Legacy on Lilac St. Gorgeous scarves, pillow shams, and throws made from recycled saris are eco-friendly and chic. humboldtslegacy.com

Nearby, step inside Whodunit? and bring out your inner detective, with books on crime fiction. whodunitcanada.com

Head north on Corydon to Nunavut Gallery and see over 4200 beautiful works of Inuit art. Paintings and sculptures by contemporary Canadian artists make a statement in any space. nunavutgallery.com

More Winnipeg shopping districts:

5 Shopping Neighbourhoods in Winnipeg
Where to shop at The Forks
Where to shop on Academy Road
Top 5 Handmade Hotspots
Where to shop in The Exchange District

Hot Shopping: Editors Pick – Top 5 Gourmand Go-To’s

Korean-BBQTravelling foodsters know that the way into the heart of a city is through its stomach. And while eating on vacation can be memorable, gourmet items you can take home help recreate those experiences.

If you’ve tried one of the hottest dining trends, Korean BBQ, head to Bosch Kitchen Appliance Centre to pick up a plug-in electric Korean BBQ of your own (pictured). Set the bar with an interactive dinner party your guests won’t forget! 105-2800 Pembina Hwy, 204-275-2617

Sticking to a regime while on the road is tough, which makes the availability of everyday organic at specialty spot Organza a blessing. Stock up on local products such as Whiteshell Dairy cheese, or start the day right at its in-house juice bar. 230 Osborne St #2A 204-453-6266

Cooking at home may not yield Top Chef results, if the kitchen is full of clutter! For Space Sake carries a wide variety of kitchen organizers that are functional and eye catching. 1824 Grant Ave,
204-488-2633

Local Meats and Frozen Treats is passionate about gourmet gleans. It stocks everything from local sausages to flavoured creamed honey. Manitoba’s best products line the shelves and freezer walls. 1604 St Mary’s Rd, 204-255-2172

Before catching a flight or hitting the road, stop by Humboldt’s Legacy to pick up some last minute travel snacks. Locally made Gorp Energy Bars taste great and pack a nutritional punch. 887 Westminster Ave, (204) 772-140

Canada’s 10 Best Island Holiday Destinations

By KAT TANCOCK

Cape Breton Island (Photo: Nova Scotia Tourism)

When we think of island vacations, the tropical always springs to mind: hot sun, sand, flip-flops and a fruity drink with an umbrella. But Canada has islands on offer, too, with a lot more to attract visitors than you might think. Here are 10 picks to consider for your next vacation.

Start the slideshow of top island destinations »

19 of Canada’s Most Unusual Museums

by CARISSA BLUESTONE

Canada’s Most Unusual Museums: the world-famous Gopher Hole Museum (Photo: Colin Smith)

Did you know that Vancouver has an entire museum devoted to corkscrews, that diehard Anne Murray fans can devour every detail of her life and record a CD with her in Nova Scotia, or that a tiny town called Vulcan in the Alberta Prairies is home to a Star Trek–themed tourist “station”? From the über-Canadian to the downright kooky, these unusual, one-of-a-kind and just plain weird museums earn the moniker “cabinet of curiosities”.

Start the slideshow of Canada’s most unusual museums »

Shel Zolkewich, Manitoba’s Travel Writer and Adventurer Extraordinaire

Shel Zolkewich

Shel Zolkewich in her favourite setting

Shel Zolkewich squealed with delight when she opened an envelope from the Manitoba government a few weeks ago. Inside was confirmation that she was one of the people to win the draw for elk hunting licenses this season. It meant that she and her dad could take the hunting trip they had been planning.

For Shel Zolkewich, a Manitoba travel writer who splits her time between Winnipeg and Gimli, there is no separation between her work and her personal life. She lives what she writes, and all her trips yield content for her next travel story. Her specialty is the outdoors, and for one week every month she is on the road, fishing, hunting and taking photos. Her preferred place is the north, she says, “where there are small airplanes, muddy roads and feisty northern pike.”

We caught up with Shel Zolkewich between a stint of caribou stalking and a trip to Alaska. (more…)

Hot Dining: Editor’s Picks: Top 5 Spots for Manitoba Regional Cuisine

Saskatoon berry pie from Tall Grass Prairie Bread Company

Manitoba regional cuisine marries nature’s bounty with local cultural flair. Here are our top five choices for tasty locally sourced eats in Winnipeg and nearby. (more…)