• eat
  • shop
  • see
  • go
  • stay
  • daytrip
  • map
  • calendar
  • transport
  • weather
  • currency
  • tofrom

local

Artist Spotlight: Valerie Metcalfe

By Kelsey Schaefer

VALERIE METCALFE has dedicated more than 45 years to pursue her pottery passion.

Decades of practising this meticulous art form have resulted in stunning works that evoke organic shapes and subtle floral details. She currently produces more than 1500 artworks per year. Inspiration comes from her life-long interest in nature and her love for the flow of a paintbrush.

While Valerie credits art school for introducing her to pottery, much of her learning has taken place outside of the classroom. She is the last founding member of the Stoneware Gallery, an artist-run business managed by a co-operative of ceramics artists. She also teaches classes at the Stoneware Studio.

Valerie admits that following her passion may not have brought her immense wealth, but it’s provided her with something she believes is much more valuable: a lifelong career full of reverence and significant relationships.

2018 marks the 40th anniversary of Stoneware Gallery, where throughout her extensive career, the love of the craft has kept Valerie committed. Valerie’s collections are sold at The Stoneware Gallery, 778 Corydon Ave, 204-475-8088, stonewaregallery.com

Artist Spotlight: Christian Worthington

By Teena Legris

CHRISTIAN WORTHINGTON is a Canadian multimedia artist who has garnered both local and international acclaim. With over twenty years studying the techniques of classic masters such as Rembrandt and Caravaggio, along with American abstract expressionists, he is endlessly intrigued by historical periods and the experimental trends in art.

   Christian is dedicated to applying his broad range of work in a variety of genres, narratives and themes. From representational portraits in oils to contemporary abstracts, he considers himself “an investigative painter delving into sculpture.” Each explorative medium, including his three-dimensional forms in clay, copper, and steel, demonstrates attention to precision with dramatic effects rendered through the contrast of light and shadow.

   Seeing each project as an opportunity to explore art on a macro and existential level, his objective is to “take an immaterial essence, an emotion or even a spiritual idea, and make it tangible. Like a transfer of stewardship from conception to creation.”

   The desire to delve further into large-scale industrial design led to a melding of creative minds in the spring of 2017. Christian connected with Swiss-born sculptor, Jürgen Cooper Meier, whose art consists of a prolific body of privately commissioned, large-scale abstract steel sculptures. Both artists have created a dynamic series of small prototypes (maquettes), representative of large-scale pieces intended for public exhibit. Paul Zacharias, Director of the LANTERN Gallery, hosts the exhibition of collaborative sculptures by Christian Worthington and Jürgen Cooper Meier from April 6-14, 2018. 211 Pacific Ave, 204-226-2357, lanternshows.com

Top 5 Arts & Food Pairings

Get dinner and a show by pairing a performance with a masterpiece meal at one of these local restaurants.

Housemade pastas at The Mitchell Block are the perfect prelude to curtain raising at the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre. Try tender agnolotti stuffed with sweet potato and sage bathed in brown butter.
• 173 McDermot Ave, 204-949-9032

The oldest continually running theatre company in Canada, Le Cercle Moliere delights with whimsical French language performances. Stop in at the Centre Culturel Franco-Manitobain before a show and dine on filling tourtiere covered in maple cream sauce at Stella’s bright, welcoming space.
• 340 Provencher Blvd, 204-447-8393

Make a pitstop at the Saddlery on Market, steps from the Centennial Concert Hall, before watching one of Winnipeg’s most venerated arts institutions perform. Roasted beet and goat cheese salad (pictured) will have feet tapping even before the Royal Winnipeg Ballet takes stage.
• 114 Market Ave, 204-615-1898

Magical adventures unfold on the Manitoba Theatre for Young People stage. Take advantage of the theatre’s location at The Forks and slurp up a plate of spaghetti bolognese at the Old Spaghetti Factory inside the Johnston Terminal.
• 25 Forks Market Rd, 204-957-1391

At the Winnipeg Art Gallery, glimpses of Wanda Koop’s work grace the walls. After touring the exhibits, head to the museum’s penthouse level, where Table restaurant serves scrumptious exhibit-inspired lunches.
• 300 Memorial Blvd, 204-948-0085

Now Open: EPH Apparel

Courtesy of EPH Apparel

Photo by Simeon Rusnak. Courtesy EPH Apparel

Popular purveyor of menswear EPH Apparel has moved their flagship store into a stunning new downtown location. The brand, which launched an online-only operation in 2010, has made a mission of proving customized, made-to-order suits are attainable for any budget. Face to face consultation at the new shop offer gents the opportunity to create their own bespoke suit, from cuff to lapel, in person. Drop by the sleek space or call ahead to book a consultation. Mon-Sat 10 am-7 pm. 190 Smith St, 1‑888‑343‑6117, ephapparel.com

Local Colour

By Joelle Kidd
Photos by Ian McCausland

Move over minimalism: Winnipeg retailers are ushering in spring with bold and bright hues.

Speedy In Pink

CiaoGiftGuide6456

Little speed demons will be off in a flash on a mini racecar from local fashion and gift shop, Moulé. $250. 443 Academy Rd, 204‑488‑1891, moulestores.com

Dreamy Decor

CiaoGiftGuide6514

With glassware, art pieces, and garden accessories straight from Mexico, stepping into La Bodega Imports offers the festive takeaways of a sun-drenched vacation. Keep the party going with confetti glass margarita, rocks, and wine glasses. $14.95 each. 955 PortageAve, 204-772-4331, labodegaimports.com

Colourful Kitchen

CiaoGiftGuide6730

Scoop N’ Weigh has items for the discerning gourmand alongside quality bulk specialty food. These bright kitchen torches make caramelizing cute. $29.99. 1770 Taylor Ave, 204‑489‑1031, scoopnweigh.com

Culture Cred

CiaoGiftGuide7171

 

 

Find Indigenous art and craft pieces at Teekca’s Aboriginal Boutique. Make a style statement with reading glasses sporting chic designs by First Nations artist Corrine Hunt. $39.95. The Forks Market, 204‑946‑0539, teekcasboutique.ca

Sock It To Me

CiaoGiftGuide7237

While stocking up for outdoor fun at Royal Sports, pick out a pair of silly socks to show off your quirky side. Burton, sizes s/m and m/l, $27.96-$29.95. 750 Pembina Hwy, 204-453-7437, facebook

Plugged In

CiaoGiftGuide6982

Exchange District shop UN Luggage is the place to go for travel solutions, like smart, stackable 4-in-1 travel adapters that prepare jet setters for any situation. $32. 175 McDermot Ave, 204‑943‑1068, unluggage.com

Bright Blooms

CiaoGiftGuide7130

Start the growing season at Shelmerdine, which boasts an expansive greenhouse and retail space with products for green thumbs. Kneelo pads with memory foam technology give gung-ho gardeners a comfy place to plant. $44.99. 7800 Roblin Blvd, 204-895-7203, shelmerdine.com

Red Is Best

CiaoGiftGuide6994

Sweet shop for nature lovers, the Preferred Perch, adds some nutty fun to the kitchen with this bright red squirrel nutcracker. $21.99. 1604 St Mary’s Rd, 204‑257‑3724, thepreferredperch.ca

More Winnipeg Shopping Stories:

Where to Shop Downtown
Top 5 Spring Fashion Finds
Where to Shop on Corydon

Top 5 Homegrown Stocking Stuffers

Photo by Ian McCausland

Photo by Ian McCausland

Give Christmas morning some Manitoba flavour and flair with these locally made products.   

A well-stocked pantry isn’t complete without sweet saskatoon jam from Tall Grass Prairie Bakery, made with local fruit. 859 Westminster Ave, 204‑783‑5097; The Forks Market, main floor, 204‑957‑5097, tallgrassbakery.ca

Lennard Taylor‘s leather card sleeve wallets are proof that good things come in small packages. The compact design makes paying with plastic a breeze. 223 McDermot Ave, 204-791-4547, lennardtaylor.com

Margot + Maude is a go-to for bold statement accessories. Handcrafted bracelets by Sarah Cameron Jewelry are made with 14k gold and raw quartz, for a feminine yet edgy touch. 80 Academy Rd, 204-272-9140, margotandmaude.com

Located in the city’s Exchange District, A Pinch of Creativity is a haven for local artisans. Support local this winter in stylish, hand knitted infinity scarves by Sly Scarves. 96 McDermot Ave, apinchofcreativity.com

Take home a piece of Canada’s ancestry at Cree-ations. The shop carries beautiful First Nations clothing and accessories like cozy mittens decorated with traditional beadwork. 1346 Main St, 204‑219‑7428, facebook

The Play’s The Thing

By Janice Tober

Winnipeg has long been known for its rich cultural scene, generating artists who dazzle the world with creativity in both the visual and performing arts. It is our theatre scene, however, that wins Winnipeg the cultural crown.

In a city home to the country’s oldest English regional theatre, as well as Canada’s longest-running French company, theatre is ingrained in the hearts of Winnipeggers who grow up experiencing thought-provoking plays produced by these venerated institutions. It is these early companies that have emboldened aspiring artists to create theatre groups of their own, in all shapes and sizes. WHERE Winnipeg offers a sneak peek of the plays that promise to be the most talked-about dramas, inspiring stories and laugh-out-loud comedies of the 2016/17 season.

RMTC

Royalty Lives Here

Winnipeggers often look to the city’s most prominent stage, the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre, to keep them entertained. It is the only theatre in Canada to receive royal designation, and is housed in a stunning Brutalist-style building in the Exchange District that commands respect. With a 58-year history, the company has a record of producing plays that hit the mark with audiences.

Steven Schipper, the company’s Artistic Director, states, “planning seasons is the only thing that I don’t delegate,” as he works to find plays that appeal to Winnipeg’s sophisticated artistic palate.

RMTC’s season opener, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (adapted by Simon Stephens), is a co-production with Edmonton’s Citadel Theatre. This Tony Award-winner, based on Mark Haddon’s bestseller of the same name, begins when fifteen-year-old Christopher is accused of killing his neighbour’s dog. The story follows Christopher, diagnosed with autism, as he works to clear his name and solve the mystery on his own. A strong and stimulating choice, this coming-of-age tale exposes Christopher’s vulnerabilities as well as his strengths with insight and humour. The show runs from Oct 20 to Nov 12.

Just down the street from RMTC is its second stage, the Tom Hendry Warehouse. With its own full season curated by Schipper, the Warehouse focuses on works that are more provocative and controversial than those seen on the mainstage.

The season begins with another play based on a novel: My Name is Asher Lev, by Chaim Potok. Running Oct 13-29, Aaron Posner’s stage adaptation is a thoughtful meditation on how an artist and his or her work can be driven by a compulsion that threatens both family and tenets once held dear. This co-production with Montreal’s Segal Centre is well-suited to the Warehouse’s smaller space where theatregoers are close to the drama unfolding in front of them. “It’s a perfect play for our intimate Hendry Theatre,” says Schipper. “Audiences embrace work that touches, challenges, and entertains, while asking important questions about how we may best live our lives.”

Courtesy Theatre Cercle Moliere

Courtesy Theatre Cercle Moliere

Multiculti Stages

Winnipeg’s multicultural makeup is mirrored in the city’s arts groups. In St Boniface, signs and snippets of conversation en français are reminders that French voyageurs settled here, and it is Théâtre Cercle Molière—the oldest French theatre in Canada—that best reflects this distinct Francophone community.

Geneviève Pelletier, Cercle Molière’s Artistic and General Director, chose to open the season with Et que ça saute!, an original piece by Winnipeg playwright, Danielle Séguin-Tétreault. Pelletier says she wanted to “kick off the season with a real side splitter,” and, with a title that translates to mean, “And make it snappy!” expect fast-paced dialogue and quick comedic timing. Centred around five people in an apartment building who are all searching for something in their lives, the play takes the audience through what Pelletier calls “the twists and turns of a day gone wrong.” The play opens on Oct 13 and runs until Oct 29 with simultaneous translation on certain dates.

In the late 19th- and early-20th centuries Winnipeg welcomed many Jewish immigrants and settlers to the city, many of whom helped create its arts institutions. The Winnipeg Jewish Theatre had its inaugural season in 1987 and has a history of showcasing original plays by some of Canada’s top playwrights—such as work by Winnipeg-born Vern Thiessen, recipient of the Governor General’s award for his moving drama, Einstein’s Gift—that highlight and lay bare the Jewish experience with emotion, comedy and accrued insight.

Running from Oct 27-Nov 6, the 2016 season opener is the Canadian premiere of Another Way Home by Anna Ziegler. Set in the summer during visiting day at Camp Kickapoo, on the surface Another Way Home is simply a witty story that catches parents in the midst of escalating conflict with their son, Joey. But amidst the barbs, the play examines what it means to be a family desperately trying to deal with a troubled son.

Courtesy Soul Pepper Theatre Company

Courtesy Soul Pepper Theatre Company

Bring the Kids

Manitoba Theatre for Young People evolved from Actor’s Showcase, an amateur theatre group that offered training for local talent, and grew with a new mandate to become one of the most respected stages in Canada for its creative, built-from-scratch productions and innovative children’s programming. Since its beginnings in 1982, the company has never rested on its laurels, winning its first award in 1992—the Canadian Institute of the Arts for Young Audiences Award—before earning a Dora Mavor Moore Award for Outstanding Production in the Theatre for Young Audiences category in 2007.

The 2016 season opens with Alligator Pie (running Oct 26-Nov 6), an original Dora Award-winning production by Toronto’s Soulpepper company. “The whole play is built around the beloved poems of Dennis Lee,” comments Pablo Felices-Luna, the company’s new Artistic Director, “so all of our fun is made possible through the work of an outstanding Canadian poet. And that’s how we wanted to launch, [with] all of the wildness you can experience at our theatre.” The play is full of infectious musical numbers and theatrical zaniness, but underlying the high-energy production is a message about the importance of friendship.

Courtesy Prairie Theatre Exchange

Courtesy Prairie Theatre Exchange

Go Grassroots

Since opening its doors in a ramshackle building in the Exchange District, Prairie Theatre Exchange has always been a small company rooted in the community. The theatre offered its rehearsal space to amateur groups and allowed them to perform on its stage between its own shows. Today, PTE is found in a downtown shopping centre, and it still belongs to Winnipeggers: in 2007 it opened its Playwrights Unit, where experienced and new local playwrights are provided with an office, the resources needed to put on a live reading or workshop, and input from fellow auteurs.

PTE continues its focus on work by Manitoban and Canadian artists with the play The Gravitational Pull of Bernice Trimble, penned by Canadian playwright, Beth Graham. Running from Oct 12-30, the play centres on Bernice’s daughter, Iris, as her Mom calls the family together to announce that she has been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s. The emotionally heavy story can be challenging for audiences, but when asked about this selection for the 2016/17 season, Artistic Director Robert Metcalfe explains, “This play was nominated for a Governor General’s Award in 2015, and I love it because of its fundamental honesty and heart in addressing some very serious subject matter—including the unique relationship between mothers and daughters—and the choices we make, both in parenting and in life.” Metcalfe has no need to shy away from difficult work, knowing that the city’s erudite audience is up for the challenge.

(more…)

Hot Dining: Now Open

Peg Beer Co. photo by David Wakeman

Peg Beer Co. photo by David Wakeman

Peg Beer Co., the latest venture from Nicole Barry, former CEO of local Half Pints Brewing Company, has opened its doors in the Exchange District. A one-time warehouse turned skatepark is now home to this convivial brewpub, where craft beer is joined by family-style feasts. Chef Aron Epp’s menu takes inspiration from the earthy, farm staples of past generations with shareable spreads and ingredients pulled from Manitoba soil. 125 Pacific Ave, 204‑416‑2337.

Saperavi is the first Georgian restaurant to open on the prairies. The bright 2nd floor space serves Caucasus specialties like khinkali, a spiced meat filled dumpling, and shashlik, meat grilled on skewers. 709 Corydon Ave, 204‑416‑3996

Mingle with Locals at the Canmore Mountain Market

On Thursday, June 11, the sun was shining during the first Canmore Mountain Market of the season. Vendors from Canmore and the surrounding area came to peddle their wares, drawing crowds of locals and tourists alike.

The Raven and The Fox provided entertainment, filling the market with singer Julie Chang’s melodious voice and acoustic guitarist Sean Isaac’s accompaniment. The duo played a few of their original songs and covered bands including Guns N’ Roses and Damien Rice.

Spring brings an abundance of new seasonal fruits and vegetables, which were out in force. Fresh and colourful produce filled every corner of the market. Favourites like crunchy sweet peppers, cucumbers, tomatoes and black kale sat beside baskets of beautiful strawberries, raspberries, cherries and grapes. Interesting additions include garlic scapes and heirloom eggplants.

Red, orange, yellow and green peppers provided a rainbow of healthy snacks. Photo by Ashley Materi

Red, orange, yellow and green peppers provided a rainbow of healthy snacks. Photo by Ashley Materi

(more…)

June Hot Shopping

By Suzanne Rent

HOMESPUN STYLE

Lost cod 1

The Lost Cod in the Historic Properties on Lower Water Street will help you create clothes with Nova Scotia-inspired designs. Pick from a stock of logo designs that represent a vast swath of Nova Scotia’s commercial and cultural past (including beloved throwback sports logos like the Nova Scotia Voyageurs, Sydney Millionaires and Halifax Windjammers). Then, choose a garment, size and colour and you have your own summer style inspired by the province’s rich history. Great for gifts, too.

MADE FOR MEN

Duggers

 

• Men looking to update their summer wardrobe can stop into Duggers on Spring Garden Road. Find exclusive brands such as Hugo Boss, Canali, Coppley, Sand and Van Gils. Or visit D2 on the main level for the latest summer trends in men’s style.
• At Colwell’s in the Historic Properties on Lower Water Street, find all the basics such as dress shirts, pants, sports jackets, jeans and t-shirts.

 

 

 

 

FRESH FASHIONj&r-grimsmo-1-copy

• J&R Grimsmo Boutique on Barrington Street carries gorgeous styles for women, all ethically manufactured, made with sustainable materials and processes, but some of the best designers in North America. Find dresses, tops and bottoms and lots of accessories for any summer outing.
• For casual styles for those active shoppers on the go, try Olsen Europe in Park Lane and Mic Mac Mall. Produced in Hamburg, Germany, these styles are modern, fresh and available in a variety of colours for the season.
• At Wildflower Clothing Inc. on Clyde Street, owner Jill Strong finds styles that are like the comfort food of clothing that work for women looking for no-fuss styles. Accessorize with hats, belts, scarves or handbags.

ONE-STOP SHOP

SunnysideSunnyside Mall on Bedford Highway
is home to various retailers from around the
region. Shop for summer fashions at Turbine
or Moe’s Menswear, accessories at Peoples
Jewellers and something for the kids at Bib ’N Tucker.

 

 

BRILLIANT BLING

Frida Dress up your best outfit with custom jewellery from Frida in Bishop’s Landing on Lower Water
Street. There are styles from Canadian and European designers, and various collections highlighting gemstones and diamonds. Book a consultation to help create your own piece of wearable art.
• At Fireworks Gallery on Barrington Street, in-house goldsmiths and gem masters create unique Old World designs in gold, silver and platinum using New World techniques.

Work with one of these masters on
creating a design that tells your
personal story.

 

 

Editor’s Choice

sweet-pea_trends11Summer is the season for dresses and Sweet Pea Boutique on Queen Street has a huge selection of summer frocks for every occasion. Find dresses, rompers or jumpers with flowers, stripes, lace, all perfect for tea parties, weddings or a summer night on the town.

Hot Shopping Halifax: Metal Works

Pendants and other jewellery are available at Aiktens Pewter.

Handmade pewter collectibles, décor, tableware, jewellery, ornaments and more are the specialty at Aitkens Pewter in the Historic Properties on Upper Water Street.

Close by on Lower Water Street is Amos Pewter, where you can watch pewter being cast and learn about the company’s award-winning designs. Buy a gift or something for yourself on site.

Hot Halifax Shopping: Made in the Maritimes

NovaScotian Crystal

Ship’s Decanter, a handmade, local item from NovaScotian Crystal.

Looking for the perfect gift? Look local at these shops specializing in Maritime-made treasures.

Halifax Seaport Farmers’ Market on Marginal Road: North America’s oldest farmers’ market, it recently moved to a state-of-the-art new building on the Halifax waterfront. Every Saturday, vendors from across the province share their wares.

NovaScotian Crystal on George Street: Craftsman work on site, using ancient techniques to create beautiful and functional crystal pieces.

Jennifer’s of Nova Scotia on Spring Garden Road: Everything sold here is Maritime-made, including some 143 Nova Scotian creations. From clothes to jam, there’s a tremendous variety.