• eat
  • shop
  • see
  • go
  • stay
  • daytrip
  • map
  • calendar
  • transport
  • weather
  • currency
  • tofrom

Jamie Kennedy

Weekend Roundup, November 18 to 20

Friday: The National Ballet of Canada interprets Romeo and Juliet (photo by Bruce Zinger)

Friday, November 18
See one of the greatest dance dramas in a brand new light when the National Ballet of Canada presents Romeo and Juliet. Choreographer Alexi Ratmansky gives the classic tale with a modern edge for a fresh show at the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts.

One of Canada’s best-known musical voices, Steven Page, interprets the tunes of Elvis Costello, Harry Nilsson, Randy Newman and others in Songbook 6. The always innovative Art of Time Ensemble accompanies the singer at Harbourfront Centre’s Enwave Theatre.

Find unique Aboriginal arts, crafts and fashions at the Thunderbird Centre’s presentation, Very Beautiful Things. The exhibition and sale at the Gladstone Hotel will be a trove for discerning gift buyers and Aboriginal art collectors.

The rest of the weekend is just a click away!

2010 Dining Guide: Nosh from Nearby

Cowbell is a favourite for locally sourced, sustainable fare (photo by Derek Shapton)

It’s no surprise that some of Toronto’s top-rated restaurants are devotees of the local food movement: sourcing from nearby artisan farms and producers ensures freshness, which in turn guarantees flavour. Any discussion of “slow food” in this city begins with chef Jamie Kennedy, whose Gilead Café & Bistro serves modern Canadian fare that lets his farm-fresh ingredients shine. Tastefully simple, too, are the artisan meats butchered in-house and served at such restaurants as Cowbell and the Black Hoof—the latter’s charcuterie is legendary, as are the bone marrow–filled beignets at its sister space, Hoof Café. Slightly less meat-
centric is chef Teo Paul’s contemporary country cooking at Union—though you’d be remiss not to order the elk sliders.

Of course, using homegrown ingredients doesn’t mean a chef has to forsake global influences. Local Kitchen and Wine Bar preaches respect for one’s ingredients through exceedingly fresh Italian small plates, while amongst chef Victor Barry’s contemporary offerings at Splendido are a handful of traditional pastas plated with family-farmed accompaniments. High-end, internationally inspired cuisine made with Toronto flair can also be found at long-standing favourites like elegant George and Globe Bistro.

Hot Dining: Now at Night

photo by Jo Dickins

Since opening in 2008, Gilead Café has grown to be a favourite amongst local lunchers. It’s so popular, in fact, that chef Jamie Kennedy has been persuaded to keep his Corktown establishment open for dinner, too. From Tuesday to Saturday the café becomes a bistro, where patrons can select from a seasonal à la carte menu highlighting ingredients sourced from local producers. Guests can expect sustainable fish, naturally raised meats and exclusively in-season produce from Kennedy’s recently debuted spring menu. Ontario vineyards aren’t forgotten either, with several homegrown varietals featured on the wine list.

Weekend Roundup, December 4th to December 6th

December is finally here! ‘Tis the season to eat, drink, shop, skate and be merry at festive holiday performances.

Friday: Spend an evening at the Distillery Historic District

Friday: Spend some time at the Distillery Historic District

Friday December 4th
Pick out gifts for little loved-ones at the Distillery Historic District’s Children’s Trunk Show shopping event, then spend the evening walking the area’s cobblestone laneways and admiring its seasonal light display.

Get into the festive spirit at the Friday After Five event hosted by the Gardiner Museum. This special holiday happy hour features Christmas cocktails and a tourtiere poutine created by celebrity chef Jamie Kennedy.

Partake in a 72-year-old seasonal tradition at the Church of the Holy Trinity—its Christmas Story performance brings the nativity to soul-stirring life.

Saturday: Tea at the Royal York

Saturday: Tea at the Royal York

Saturday, December 5th
Take time for afternoon tea at the Fairmont Royal York Hotel and nibble on finger sandwiches, mincemeat tarts and other holiday treats. Visitors can also take home decadent goodies from the on-site Festive Bakery.

Meet new friends while learning how to pry open shellfish at the singles oyster shucking, tasting & wine pairing night at Leslieville gastro-pub Prohibition.

Sing along with Weezer and other alternative-rock superstars—the Air Canada Centre hosts radio station 102.1 The Edge’s Jingle Bell Rock concert.

Sunday: Eva Avila portrays Maid Marian in Robin Hood

Sunday: Eva Avila portrays Maid Marian in Robin Hood

Sunday, December 6th
Enjoy a festive afternoon at Roy Thompson Hall as the Toronto Symphony Orchestra presents Dickens’s holiday classic, A Christmas Carol.

Strap on your blades for Harbourfront Centre’s HarbourKIDS: SK8 festival at Canada’s largest artificially cooled outdoor ice rink.

Follow Robin Hood as his merry men as they engage in eco-conscious hijinks in the Ross Petty production of Robin Hood: The Environ-Mental Family Musical.

Green Gastronomy

The movement to make eating a healthier and more environmentally friendly affair is bigger than ever. Free-range meat is sold everywhere, the 100-mile diet is ingrained in our lexicon, and even the White House has a vegetable garden. In Toronto, a number of chefs and restaurants have long promoted a more sustainable dining experience with seasonal, locally sourced ingredients in oft-changing but always delicious menus. Where presents a primer on a few of the well-regarded establishments that are giving this city’s foodies even more reasons to go green.  BY ALEX HUGHES

Cowbell (photo by Derek Shapton)ANIMAL APPRECIATION
“From farm to table, nose to tail” is the motto of popular west-end bistro Cowbell, which embraces “full boar” many of the slow food movement’s principles by sourcing only the freshest seasonal ingredients for its high-end fare. Almost all of the organic meats—from Berkshire pork to red deer—and produce served here are from Ontario farms, and it’s also one of the few restaurants in Toronto to buy whole animals, which are butchered, smoked and cured on-site. It’s no wonder Toronto diners still clamour for chef Mark Cutrara’s daily menu. An added bonus: Cowbell hosts reservation-only “Farmers Nights,” where a five-course meal is created using ingredients from a single farm. Along with chef Cutrara, the featured farmers are also on-hand to discuss their craft at the restaurant’s communal table.

(more…)