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hockey

Hot Dining: Top 5 Game-Day Picks

Jets roll from Meiji. Photo by chronic creative.

Local restaurants have caught game-day fever, offering tasty fare to savour in front of the big screen or creative dishes named after Winnipeg’s professional sports teams.

Rudy’s Eat and Drink serves a special events menu before Jets games and other MTS Centre events, filled with share-ables, hefty burgers, and comfort food entrees. 375 Graham Ave, 204-421-9094, website

If soccer is more your speed, join the cheering crowd at Corrientes. The Argentinean pizzeria is abuzz with excitement during World Cup years, but the Exchange District location makes it an ideal stop for pre-game empanadas for skate- and cleat-wearers alike. 137 Bannatyne Ave, 204-219-5398, website

The Jets roll (pictured) at Japanese eatery Meiji salutes the city’s NHL team. Local freshwater favourites—fresh pickerel and smoked goldeye—offer a decadent taste of Manitoba inside each bite of this artful roll topped with avocado, snow crab and salmon. 454 River Ave, 284-3996

Two levels of TVs and games, and a rooftop patio with stellar city views make the downtown location of Tavern United a sports fan favourite. Classic pub fare like fish and chips are done exceptionally well with a crunchy, beer batter coating. 260 Hargrave St, 944-0022, website

Ultra-trendy Nuburger’s “Blue &  Gold” creation is a tribute to the city’s beloved Blue Bombers. Here, a Manitoba lean ground beef patty is topped with gourmet blue cheese, chipotle aïoli, balsamic onion, greens and tomato. 472 Stradbrook Ave, 888-1001, website

Hot Date: Sens and the City

The crowd comes alive at Scotiabank Place. Photo credit: Jana Chytilova/Freestyle Photography/OSHC.

Tuesday, Oct. 11. With a new season comes new hope as the Ottawa Senators introduce a batch of fresh young faces to the line-up, just in time for the 20th anniversary of the modern franchise. Led by captain Daniel Alfredsson and superstar Jason Spezza, the team will be looking to make their mark this year. With new coach Paul MacLean behind the bench, goalie Craig Anderson between the posts, and All-Star Erik Karlsson on the ice, you’re definitely going to want to catch a game this season. We suggest their first regular season home game, which sees the Sens face off against the Minnesota Wild (also know as Dany Heatley’s new team), meaning it’s going to be one that really gets the fans going. All together now: Go Sens go!

Hot Dates: Hockey night in Halifax

The Halifax Mooseheads, of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League, have a daunting schedule this month. Highlights include matches with always tenacious Moncton on October 5, provincial rivals Cape Breton on October 9 and league champions Saint John on October 21.

Jets Land: Your Guide To Navigating a Hockey-Crazy City

MTS Centre

MTS Centre, the new home of the Winnipeg Jets.

Since the long-awaited return of the Winnipeg Jets in 2011, the city has been gripped by a renewed bout of hockey fever.

When the Winnipeg Jets played their season home opener on October 9, they found 15,000 crazed fans cheering themselves hoarse.

After all, 15 years is a long time to wait for the return of the home team.

(more…)

Canada’s Best New Attractions for Summer 2011

Art Gallery of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta

For travellers planning their summer trips in Canada this year, the regional editors of Where magazine have released their top picks for summer travel. The winners of Where Canada’s Best New Attractions for Summer 2011 represent the most exciting attractions – new, significantly improved, or celebrating major milestones this year. A diverse group of attractions from coast to coast, this year’s winners offer a wide range of activities and events suitable for any family, art lover, sports fanatic, nature lover or adventurer. Together, these attractions serve as the top must-see and must-dos for anyone travelling in Canada this summer. (more…)

Ready, Set… Go!

Halifax hosts the 2011 Canada Games—the biggest sports event in Nova Scotian history

By Christina Copp and Trevor J. Adams

In February, all eyes will be on Halifax as it hosts the Canada Games. Running from February 11 to 27, the Games will be the largest multi-sport competition in Canada in 2011.

Sports fans have lot to look forward to during the Games. “Essentially, [there are] 20 different sports, so it’s like putting on 20 national championships over 18 days,” says Melissa MacKinnon, director of communications for the Games. She suggests that outdoor sports fans head over to the long-track speed skating at the new Oval on the Halifax Common. Admission is free.

All of the events at both ski venues are also free for fans. A 45-minute drive northwest of Halifax, Martock in Windsor hosts cross-country, biathlon and snowboard competitions Freestyle and alpine skiing take place at Wentworth, an 80-minute drive north.Other highlights include gymnastics, badminton and synchronized swimming at the new Canada Games Centre in Clayton Park, hockey at the Dartmouth Sportsplex and Halifax Metro Centre and boxing at the Halifax Forum. A 40-minute drive west of the city, the St. Margaret’s Centre in St. Margaret’s Bay hosts short-track speed skating and figure skating. The Metro Centre also hosts the opening ceremonies.

The party will continue after the athletes’ days are done, too. “Celebration Square in Grand Parade will be the place to be each evening,” says MacKinnon. The concert venue in front of Halifax City Hall will feature acts like The Stanfields, Christina Martin and Matt Mays. Martin, a multiple Nova Scotia Music Award Winner, was one of more than 300 acts who submitted their names to perform during the Games cultural festivities.

“I applied to perform during the Canada Games because I want to be a part of this monumental event that is taking place on my home turf,” says Christina Martin. “After experiencing the excitement from performing at the Vancouver Winter Olympics, I jumped at the opportunity to be a part of this fantastic event.”

Games CEO Chris Morrissey is excited about the potential to bring Haligonians, athletes and visiting sports fans together. “Everyone can come together to celebrate athletic achievements while enjoying live entertainment that showcases Nova Scotia talent and culture,” he says.

Running from February 11 to 27, the Games embrace a wide variety of disciplines. For schedule and venue details, click here or phone 902-490-2011.

Mid-Season Sports

Have new faces brought a winning attitude back to this city’s professional hockey and basketball teams? Find out for yourself as the Maple Leafs and Raptors seek to maintain their mid-season momentum at the Air Canada Centre.

BLADES OF STEEL
Vesa ToskalaYou could be forgiven for wondering why it’s so difficult to get tickets to a Toronto Maple Leafs home game. After all, the National Hockey League team—and Canada’s most valuable sports franchise—hasn’t exactly been burning up the ice in recent years. It’s no secret they haven’t won the Stanley Cup since 1967, and despite attracting some laudable talent, the squad has been shut out of the playoffs in each of the previous four seasons. Such inferiority prompted a high-profile executive change last year, with team owners installing prized hockey mind Brian Burke as general manager. An architect of recent Cup contenders the Vancouver Canucks and Anaheim Ducks, Burke is noted for preferring big, tough players, and this past summer made good on his reputation by signing workhorses like Mike Komisarek and Francois Beauchemin. You won’t be seeing these defensemen at the all-star game; they earn their pay not with fancy stickhandling, but with body checks and blocked shots. Phil Kessel, acquired from the Boston Bruins, has added some scoring, but halfway through the season it’s clear the team is still a star or two away from contending. From this vantage point, the 2009–10 Maple Leafs will not likely be remembered among the storied lineups of yesteryear, but Toronto’s rink rats and ice queens nevertheless continue to live and die by the fortunes of their blue-collar hockey heroes.

(more…)

October Editor’s Picks: Art

A panel from Charles Pachter's <em>Hockey Knights in Canada</em> (photo by Carlton Parker).

A panel from Charles Pachter's Hockey Knights in Canada.

ON NOW To outsiders, the fanaticism with which Canadians embrace the game of hockey may be hard to understand; conversely, the sport is so ingrained in our collective identity that we rarely stop to question it. Attempting to find meaning in this fixation, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art presents ARENA: Road Game, a group show featuring Hockey Knights in Canada by Charles Pachter, plus related works by an artistic all-star team including Graeme Patterson and Tim Lee. No mere paean to a national pastime, the exhibition offers a deeper examination of hockey’s significance in contemporary culture, touching on everything from notions of hero worship to the controversial role of violence on the ice.

<em>Laterns, Singapore</em> by Nicolas Ruel (courtesy of Thompson Landry Gallery).

Laterns, Singapore by Nicolas Ruel.

TO OCTOBER 18 Quebec artists continue to gain an audience in Ontario courtesy of the Distillery Historic District’s beautiful Thompson Landry Gallery. Yet, in a sense, the gallery’s latest exhibition has an international flavour, as Montreal-based photographer Nicolas Ruel presents 8 Secondes, a new series of images that depict the world’s great cities through multiple eight-second exposures. Evoking a dreamlike dynamism, these photos are all the more impressive for being printed on stainless steel—the medium’s light-reflecting surface lends further animation to the already vital works.

Edward Burtynsky's <em>SOCAR Oil Fields #3, Baku, Azerbaijan</em>.

Edward Burtynsky's SOCAR Oil Fields #3, Baku, Azerbaijan.

OCTOBER 8 TO 31 Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky has long been renowned for capturing the almost unimaginable scale of heavy industry’s impact on the natural environment. His sweeping images of manufactured landscapes—at once striking and repulisive—are widely collected and have been the subject of essays, books and even a documentary film. At Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s vision is distilled in an exhibition focusing on his decade-long study of oil fields and refineries from Alberta to Azerbaijan. Through these meticulously composed images, he depicts the visual duality—and implies the moral one—arising from our continuing exploitation of a resource that is equally valued and maligned.

Season of Changes

Can new faces bring a winning attitude back to this city’s professional hockey and basketball teams? Find out for yourself as the Maple Leafs and Raptors return to action at an Air Canada Centre that’s abuzz with anticipation.

Matt Stajan (photo by Graig Abel Photography).

Matt Stajan

BLADES OF STEEL
You could be forgiven for wondering why it’s so difficult to get tickets to a Toronto Maple Leafs home game. After all, the National Hockey League team—and Canada’s most valuable sports franchise—hasn’t exactly been burning up the ice in recent years. It’s no secret they haven’t won the Stanley Cup since 1967, and despite attracting some laudable talent, the squad has been shut out of the playoffs in each of the previous four seasons. Such inferiority prompted a high-profile executive change last year, with team owners installing prized hockey mind Brian Burke as general manager. An architect of recent Cup contenders the Vancouver Canucks and Anaheim Ducks, Burke is noted for preferring big, tough players, and this summer made good on his reputation by signing workhorses like Mike Komisarek, Garnet Exelby and Francois Beauchemin. You won’t be seeing these defensemen at the all-star game; they earn their pay not with fancy stickhandling, but with body checks and blocked shots. Lacking any true scoring stars, it’s unlikely the 2009–10 version of the Maple Leafs will be remembered among the storied lineups of yesteryear, but this city of rink rats and ice queens nevertheless lives and dies by the fortunes of its blue-collar hockey heroes.

(more…)

Summer Stops for Families

From the most intrepid of daredevils to the quietest of bookworms, bright summer days bring out the playfulness in us all. To make this the best summer yet, Where Toronto offers 15 exciting ways to craft your own fun in the sun.

There are thrills galore at Canada's Wonderland.

Find thrills at Canada's Wonderland.

ADRENALIN-FUELED ESCAPADES
More then 200 attractions and 65 rides test the truly adventurous at Canada’s Wonderland. This first-class amusement park is home to the Behemoth—the country’s tallest and fastest roller coaster with open-air seating and a blood-curdling 230-foot drop. If riding the rails isn’t your thing, try thrill rides like the toe-curling Drop Tower and stomach-wrenching Psyclone. For more subdued, tot-friendly amusements, head to Kidzville and Nickelodeon Central—kids will get a kick out of Dora’s Dune Buggies and Scooby Doo’s Haunted Mansion. Cool down at Splash Works, a 20-acre water park with twisting slides like the Super Soaker and the Plunge. Adults $51.99, seniors and kids $29.35.

(more…)