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Hannah Poaros-McDermott

Relive the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver

A decade has passed since Vancouver and Whistler hosted the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, where Team Canada secured a record-breaking number of gold medals and finished third overall. Here are 10 ways to recapture the city’s most memorable moments.

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT

Jan. 2019

The Olympic Cauldron at Jack Poole Plaza (Photo by KK Law)

1. Gaze upon the 10-m- (33-ft-) tall Olympic cauldron at Jack Poole Plaza, with the North Shore mountains in the distance.

2. Take a peek at the Olympic display, which features torches and a full set of shiny medals, inside the Vancouver Convention Centre.

3. Pick up a pair of limited-edition 10-year-anniversary Team Canada mittens from Hudson’s Bay.

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No Skis (or Boards) Required

For a perfect day off the slopes, try one—or all—of these activities. There’s snow much fun to be had!

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT

Jan. 2019

Five thousand twinkling lights illuminate nearly 300 trees in Whistler Village (Photo by Mike Crane courtesy Tourism Whistler)

Peak Perspectives

Ride the Peak 2 Peak Gondola on a dizzying 4.4-km (2.7-mi) journey between Whistler and Blackcomb. Feeling adventurous? Catch the extraordinary glass-bottomed gondola and peek down at the powder-covered alpine fairyland 436 m (1,430 ft) below.

Organic Oasis

Need to chill out? Soak up magical mountain views from a rooftop hot tub at The Spa at Nita Lake Lodge. There are a plethora of tranquil treatments on offer, too: hydrafacials, massages, body scrubs, manicures and more. 

Glide to Gold

Put your skating skills to the test on the outdoor ice rink at Whistler Olympic Plaza. With free admission, $6 skate rentals and an Olympic-ring backdrop, it’s a frosty family favourite all winter long.

Indoor Discoveries

Escape the freezing temperatures outside with a visit to the inspiring and interactive exhibits at the Whistler Museum. Snap a selfie with a real Olympic torch, marvel at the original gondola, and learn fascinating facts about the resident black bears.

Ready, Set, Go!

Challenge your friends to a playful, giggle-inducing race at Whistler Olympic Park in the picturesque Callaghan Valley, where you can whiz down the sledding hill on a saucer or toboggan. 

Glow in the Dark

Looking for some extra sparkle? Go for a snowy stroll in Whistler Village, where 5,000 strings of colourful, twinkling lights—that’s 350,000 LED bulbs—illuminate nearly 300 trees.

A Fine Feast on the North Shore

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT

Dec. 2019

Indulge your taste buds at Feast the Neighbourhood Table this season. This Dundarave Village eatery serves hearty, locally sourced comfort food with a dash of French flair. Fill up on lobster bouillabaisse and Atlantic cod en papillote—that means “steamed in paper,” for those of us who aren’t gastro-nerds—as well as crispy fried chicken and Buddha bowls with house-made kimchi. Hungry for more? Share one of the mouth-watering Feast Platters (Earth, Sea or Surf and Turf). Don’t forget to order the fluffy mini-donuts—there’s always room for dessert.

Vancouver Art Gallery: Transits and Returns

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT

“Skin Country” by Carol McGregor (Photo by Louis Lim. Image courtesy the artist)

To Feb. 23, 2019 For a unique insight into the nations of the Pacific region, stroll over to Transits and Returns at the Vancouver Art Gallery. In collaboration with Brisbane’s Institute of Modern Art, this transportive exhibit connects 21 Indigenous artists—including local First Nations—who tackle themes of movement, kinship, territory and representation. Carol McGregor’s remarkable possum-skin map, “Skin Country,” depicts indigenous plants used by Aboriginal communities near Brisbane, while Taloi Havini’s four-channel video “Habitat III” reveals the tense relationship between Australia and Bougainville, an autonomous region of Papua New Guinea. Chantal Fraser, of Samoan descent, manipulates objects to challenge cultural interpretations: don’t miss “The Way,” a dazzling rhinestone-studded wind turbine. Through their practices, the artists dive headfirst into ancestral roots and travel routes. And it’s a trip worth taking.

Creative Collaborations at Chloë Angus Design

Indigenous art meets innovative fashion at Chloë Angus Design

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT + Photos by KK LAW

Angus’s popular Spirit Collection features apparel and home decor adorned with stylized flora and fauna.

Chloë Angus grew up in a rural, primarily Indigenous, fishing village on BC’s Sunshine Coast—as far away from the fashion industry as you can get. But living completely off the grid was a blessing.  At the age of six, Angus’s hobbies included flipping through Vogue magazines found at her local thrift store, and learning to sew on a hand-crank Singer sewing machine. Now, 15 years after the launch of her label, Angus’s signature designs have been worn by everyone from Wonder Woman actor Eugene Brave Rock to royal couple Will and Kate.

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Elissa Cristall Gallery: From Here

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT

Oct. 2019

“From Here #1” by Lesley Finlayson

Painting may not be on your list of outdoor hobbies, but after seeing Lesley Finlayson’s work, you might be tempted to branch out. The Scottish-born artist is a fan of the French en plein air technique, meaning the landscape is both her subject and her studio. From Here at Elissa Cristall Gallery (Oct. 3 to 26) focuses on the relationships between light, land and water. Streams of colour splash across each canvas, and it’s not hard to imagine Finlayson embracing every type of weather. Want to give it a whirl? Set up your easel now, before Raincouver—Vancouver’s soggy alter ego—strikes again.

Before Ever After at Jennifer Kostuik Gallery

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT

Sep. 2019

“Twelve Giraffes, Maasai Mara, Kenya” by David Burdeny

African animals and their wild homes take centre stage in David Burdeny’s Before Ever After: Photographs from Kenya and Tanzania. Motivated by the threat of mass extinction, Burdeny is on a mission to show that animals are worthy of our attention—and our protection. Against stunning backdrops, a coalition of cheetahs lines up in formation.  A mini-pride of lion cubs basks in the sun. An elephant wanders through grassy plains with her calf. A tower of giraffes—yes, that’s what a group of giraffes is called—struts across the Maasai Mara National Reserve. If you’ve ever been on safari, you’ll recognize these sights. But there’s no need for a flight to Africa: Burdeny’s striking collection of photographs is on display from Sep. 13 to Oct. 6, at Jennifer Kostuik Gallery. 

Definitely Dalí: Another Dimension

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT

Sep. 2019

“Dalinian Dancer” can be found at Thurlow Street and Alberni (Photo by Caroline Toth)

Seen anything strange recently? Two large Dalí sculptures have spent the summer on Vancouver’s sidewalks as part of Chali-Rosso Gallery’s annual Definitely Dalí exhibit. “Space Venus,” hard to miss at 3.5 m (11 ft) tall, towers over visitors at the corner of West Hastings Street and Hornby until mid-January 2020.  At Thurlow Street and Alberni, “Dalinian Dancer” (pictured) comes to life thanks to augmented reality: download the dedicated app for an uncanny experience. Check out this swirly sculpture at its sidewalk location until Sep. 18, or follow it to Oakridge Centre, where it will be on display from Sep. 19 to Oct. 14 as part of Meet the Masters: From Picasso to Pop Art. Dreaming of more Dalí? Take a peek inside Chali-Rosso Gallery, where over 100 works by the Spanish artist are on display. So surreal.