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fun

Bytown’s Best Beers

By Matt Harrison

It’s a golden age of sorts. Golden suds that is. Awash in beer, the capital’s not quite drowning but rather happily drifting along in a frothy sea of microbrews. Last count finds the area home to at least two-dozen breweries and growing.

Not confined to area pubs and bars, the breweries themselves have become tourist destinations such as Beau’s Oktoberfest in September (less chance of snow!), or Les Brasseurs du Temps, a beautiful stone brewery located in Hull’s former waterworks building with patios overlooking — fittingly — Brewery Creek, an arm of the Ottawa River.

What’s driving this industry? The answer is found in the hardworking brewmasters who pride themselves in being natural and authentic. But to stand out, you also have to be a little quirky (the Broadhead team brags about giving up shaving for its craft) or take a mad-scientist approach to experimenting (an Earl Grey Marmalade Saison anyone?), or get creative with naming beers (Bog WaterPink FuzzHeller Highwater).

We asked some of the city’s top brewers to talk about what makes this city’s suds scene so great.

Father-son team, Tim and Steve Beauchesne of Beau’s Brewery. Photo courtesy of Beau’s.

Beau’s Brewing Co. (Since 2006)
Steve Beauchesne, co-founder, and CEO

What makes your brewery unique?
Our close-knit family and friends, company culture, and each of the beers we brew.

What is your favourite beer?
Bog Water. It started us on a path of experimentation, and has spawned so many interesting projects. When we decided to brew a Gruit beer [brewed with herbs other than hops], I don’t think we fully realized how much it would impact our brewery. Now with a full-time Gruit program, and as originators of International Gruit Day, it is something that many brewers [worldwide] look to us as experts on.

Les Brasseurs du Temps (Since 2009)
Alain Geoffroy, president

What makes your brewery unique?
BDT is the first craft brewery established on the Quebec side of the Outaouais. It is literally a temple of beer brewing more than 35 different types of beer [always 17 fresh beers on the menu], located in a heritage centennial building and featuring a self-guided beer museum.

What are your most underrated and favourite beers?
Underrated: L’Allumante is our nut brown ale. Despite the fact that it is our second best-selling beer [OK, not really underrated!], it remains, to my point of view, one of the best American-style nut brown ales you can find: a subtle nutty flavour sustained by a long and smooth bitterness. Favourite: La Framboyante, our raspberry pale ale. Fruit beers tend to be oversweet to my taste. La Framboyante has a perfect balance of bitterness [like biting into the raspberry seed] and sweetness of the fruit.

Brewery Kichesippi Beer Co. (Since 2010)
Paul Meek, co-owner and president

What makes your brewery unique?
Our commitment to brewing rare global styles and making them available to our customers. Logger (Pennsylvania Porter), Wuchak UK (British IPA), Donny’s Dort (Dortmunder), Phoenix and the Cat (Rauchbier), and Dartmouth Common (Steam Beer) are all great examples of [our] hard-to-find global styles.

What are your most underrated and favourite beers?
Underrated: Probably our Kichesippi Logger. The style is a Penn Porter, which was a style created by Yuengling in the U.S. It is a not a traditional British Porter or Baltic Porter as it uses a lager yeast instead of an ale yeast. Favourite: Our Kichesippi 1855. The great thing about this beer is that it teaches the customer that the colour of the beer is not directly related to its flavour. When you try this amber ale with your eyes closed, you would never guess that it’s a darker beer in the glass.

Laura Behzadi, co-owner of Bicycle Craft Brewery.

Bicycle Craft Brewery (Since 2014)
Laura Behzadi, co-owner

What makes your brewery unique?
We pride ourselves on sourcing local ingredients when available and our passion for craft beer ensures that our beer is delicious every time it’s poured. We are also avid supporters of women in the brewing industry and celebrate International Women’s Day every year with Freedom Machine, our cherry pale ale that’s named after the suffragette name for the bicycle.

What are your most underrated and favourite beers?
Underrated: Vinternat Liquorice Stout. The added raw liquorice root gives the beer a crisp finish that cools the mouth and is very thirst-quenching and refreshing. Most people are surprised when they try it. Favourite: Velocipede IPA. It’s our flagship beer and is inspired by the original name for the bicycle. Hoppy, with citrus notes and a refreshing bitterness — it’s perfect any time of year.

Whiprsnapr Brewing Co. (Since 2014)
Ian McMartin, founder, co-owner, head brewer

What makes your brewery unique?
We have a baby system (150L) and a big system (2000L). The baby system allows us to play a lot and have lots of different beers on tap, while the big guy lets us get our beers into the LCBO and The Beer Stores. We also have a great front-of-house area [for] events.

What are your most underrated and favourite beers?
Underrated: Our Carol Anne Irish blonde ale. There’s just so much flavour in it for such a light, easy drinking beer [4.7 percent]. It’s got a lot of body from wheat and honey malts, and loads of hops give it a real spring-like aroma. Favourite: Our ginger coriander cream ale. It’s based on some of the travel I used to do to China, Malaysia, and Singapore, and the flavours they use in their foods: ginger, coriander, lemon, and honey. The beer is light, crisp, bright, vibrant, packed with flavour, but still balanced.

The Season’s Hottest Shows

THE TOP SUMMER MOVIES, THEATRE, MUSIC AND DANCE

Shakespeare

The audience enjoys an actor’s performance in the heart of High Park.

Shakespeare in High Park

To Sept. 3

Canadian Stage marks 35 years of outdoor Shakespeare
performances in High Park in 2017. This year, King Lear, the Bard’s famous tale of a mad ruler’s downfall, will alternate evenings with Twelfth Night (or What You Will), a comedy of mistaken identity and gender. Whichever performance you choose, get there early to snag a good seat. High Park Amphitheatre, 1873 Bloor St. W., canadianstage.com

Beautiful: The Carole
King Musical

To Sept. 3

Be inspired by the story of Carole King, one of the most successful songwriters and solo acts in pop music history. Follow King’s rise to stardom, from her time writing with ex-husband Gerry Goffin to the launch of her solo career. Along the way, enjoy hits like “One Fine Day,” “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” and the title song, “Beautiful.”
Ed Mirvish Theatre, 244 Victoria St., mirvish.com

Billy Bishop Goes to War

July 1–Aug. 5

The Soulpepper theatre company
presents one of the most critically acclaimed and widely produced Canadian musicals of all time, Billy Bishop Goes to War. The production, written by John MacLachlan Gray and Eric Peterson, tells the story of Billy Bishop, a First World War fighter pilot, though a series of anecdotes examining his high-flying exploits and his ambivalence
toward war, nationalism and what it means to be a hero.
Young Centre for the Performing Arts,
50 Tank House Ln., soulpepper.ca

Toronto Fringe Festival

July 5–16

Programming is selected entirely by lottery, ensuring that new, avant-garde and established acts all have an equal opportunity to get noticed and try new material. It also ensures that shows are varied, novel and full of surprises. Several notable productions began as Fringe Festival premieres, including Kim’s Convenience, ’da Kink in My Hair and Life After. Along with theatrical productions, the Fringe includes dance, visual art, buskers and the FringeKids Venue, where kids pay only five dollars per show. Various venues, fringetoronto.com

Beaches International
Jazz Festival

July 7–30

More than 100 established and emerging musicians perform each year at the Beaches jazz fest, which encompasses genres from calypso to new age to Latin to blues. This year includes the return of Sounds of Leslieville & Riverside, the Beaches Jazz Latin Carnival and music at the Beach Village Kew Gardens. Also, gourmet food trucks fill Queen Street East between Woodbine and Beech from July 27 to 29.
Various venues, beachesjazz.com

SummerWorks
Performance Festival

Aug. 3–13

Each August, SummerWorks, Canada’s largest curated performance festival, hosts more than 60 theatre, dance, music and live art performances by over 500 artist in venues throughout the city. The juried festival is one of the most important places for artists to launch new works, both locally and abroad.
Various venues, summerworks.ca

Discover Secrets at 7 Incredible Winnipeg Attractions

By Joelle Kidd

Though it is the province’s largest city, Winnipeg has plenty of green space. Immerse yourself in nature and discover the secrets of Winnipeg’s outdoor attractions.

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy.

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy.

PLAYING WITH POLAR BEARS

For up close animal sightings, the Journey to Churchill Exhibit at Assiniboine Park zoo is the place to be. The main draw is a chance to come face to face with a swimming polar bear, separated by only 15 cm of polymer. This massive exhibit covers 3,714 square metres, and is home to caribou, muskox, snowy owls, arctic foxes, and, of course, seals and polar bears, whose aqueous environments are constructed side by side to encourage interaction—buffered by another polymer wall of course.

The secret to catching polar bears at play is to visit in the morning when the animals are most active. Arrive before 11 am to get the best view of the bears frolicking and swimming. The bears’ underwater enclosure is placed over a tunnel, called the Sea Ice Passage, so the curious can get an up close look at bear bellies swimming above. Get your phone ready; you’ll want to snap a selfie when a polar bear comes to check out the crowd.

  • Assiniboine Park, 2595 Roblin Blvd, 204‑927-6000

Learn more about Journey to Churchill

Courtesy Travel Manitoba

Courtesy Travel Manitoba

JUST AROUND THE RIVER BEND

Winnipeg grew out of the meeting place at the Red and Assiniboine Rivers, as these waterways made trade and travel much easier. Though planes, trains, and automobiles have superseded birch bark canoes in modern days, it is still possible to take to the river by boat for a new perspective on the city. Splash Dash Boat Tours and Rentals opens mid-May, sending river adventurers off from its perch at The Forks. Take a guided river tour and hear historical insights on points of interest along the way. When the water is calm, canoe rentals are available for those who want to paddle the Assiniboine.

  • Main dock at The Forks Historic Port, 204‑783‑6633

Where to shop while at The Forks

Photo by Ian Carter.

Photo by Ian Carter.

AU NATUREL

FortWhyte Alive is a haven for adventurous outdoor fun and environmental education, all within city limits. Paddle or go fishing on one of five lakes, walk through the wetlands on a floating boardwalk, and hike the trails that wind through surrounding aspen forest. Eco-explorers can learn about Manitoba wildlife at the site’s interpretive centre, but the best way to get up close and personal is on a bison safari—throughout May and June, buggies roll out on Thursdays at 1:30 pm to join the herd of huge hairy bison that live on the prairie.

If visiting in May, you’re just in time to catch the spring migration. Join a weekly Birding and Breakfast event to take a hike led by experienced birding guides and compare finds over pancakes at the on site Buffalo Stone Cafe.

Photo by Dan Harper.

Photo by Dan Harper.

TIME CAPSULE

It almost seems as though time has turned back to 1815 … until someone pulls out a smartphone to snap a pic of the blacksmith at work. Other than its visitors, everything at Fort Gibraltar is meticulously reproduced and restored, from costumed interpreters that explain the ins and outs of the fur trade on the prairies to the cabins filled with bundles of animal pelts.

Take a tour of the Fort to learn more about the daily life of early settlers and voyageurs from the North West Company.

Want more St Boniface history? Follow the Louis Riel walking tour

Photo courtesy of Thermea.

Photo courtesy of Thermea.

SOAK UP SOME SUN

Getting outside doesn’t necessarily mean getting active—sometimes all one needs is some fresh air and sun. The perfect place to spend a day outdoors and horizontal is Nordic-style spa Thermëa, an outdoor oasis cradled unexpectedly in an old Winnipeg residential neighbourhood.

Deep relaxation involves cycling through treatments of heat, cold, and rest. First, a toxin-clearing sit in a sauna, steam room, or hot bath, then a dip in the cold or temperate pool, followed by a period of relaxation. After a soak in the luxurious outdoor baths, journey out to the “Forest Beach”, a secluded rest area filled with loungers, Adirondack chairs, and comfy hammocks, all tucked in a lush grove of trees—the city will seem miles away.

  • 775 Crescent Dr, 1‑855‑284‑3344

See a full list of Winnipeg’s best spas and salons

MLL Heritage Wall at Upper Fort Garry Park. Photo by Pattern Interactive.

MLL Heritage Wall at Upper Fort Garry Park. Photo by Pattern Interactive.

WILD WALL

Upper Fort Garry was an important centre of the fur trade for the Hudson’s Bay Company in the late 1800s, and though only the Fort’s gate remains standing today, the recently completed Upper Fort Garry Park commemorates the site with historical markers and an interactive installation set along the site of the fort’s original wall. The Heritage Wall spans more than 400 feet and depicts the history of this land from First Nations communities to the fur trade and European settlement. Watch the wall light up with an artistic LED interpretation of the Metis buffalo hunt—come at dusk for the best view.

For total tech integration, download the park’s smartphone app which highlights points of interest and provides information on the symbols on the Heritage Wall. Historical facts hidden around the park turn each visit into a scavenger hunt.

Learn how tech integration sets the Canadian Museum for Human Rights apart

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy

A WALK IN THE PARK

Assiniboine Park, the city’s largest urban park, becomes a hotbed of activity in the spring and summer months. Beautiful blooms grow in the English gardens and Leo Mol sculpture garden, which also displays bronze figures created by the renowned artist. With winding paths and benches set in shady nooks, these gardens are a perfect place to while away the afternoon. Those itching to get active can start up an impromptu game of frisbee or fly a kite on the park’s manicured lawns.

The best way to take a tour of the park is to hop on board the miniature train that has been operating, run by the same family, for more than 50 years. This little locomotive runs daily from noon to 6 pm, and for $3 will take you on a spin around the park’s perimeter.

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Indoor Fun in Banff & Canmore

March 15, 2016
By Where Writers

Read on for some of our favourite places to escape chilly weather.

FenlandsDSC_8950

The Fenlands Banff Recreation Centre: Get your ice time in at public skates Sunday to Thursday. The $20 drop-in learn-to-curl class (Wednesdays, 6:30 to 8:30 pm) includes gear.

The Banff Centre: See top international talent at a music, dance or theatre performance. Coming up soon (March 26), Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s Going Home Star: Truth & Reconciliation portrays a First Nations woman in a life of youthful excess.

(more…)

FREE Fun In Edmonton!

Photo 1-City Hall FountainSmall

Everyone loves having fun for free, and we have tons of ways to enjoy our vibrant city without spending a cent!

First up, take a free tour of the Alberta Legislature Building! Once you are done, cool off in the wading pools and fountains out front, catch some sun on the manicured lawn, and then, at noon and 6 pm every day, you can get a free concert! An instrument called a carillon plays beautiful, clear melodies that sounds like bells ringing!

The Ledge fountain is definitely not the only place to cool off though — you can enjoy the fountain in front of city hall or one of the city’s many free outdoor spray parks including the great one at the Kinsman Sports Centre.

Art fans, or those looking to experience something new, are in luck too! You can check out all of the amazing exhibits at the Art Gallery of Alberta for FREE on the last Thursday of every month.

The FAB Gallery (or Fine Arts Building Gallery) on the UofA Campus is currently showing work from the incredibly talented Master of Fine Arts students until July 11. You are sure to see some incredibly innovative and well thought out art!

The Works Art & Design Festival kicks off today (June 19) and there will be tons of interactive exhibits all over downtown. Head to Churchill Square for the bulk of the action that will be running until July 1.

Tomorrow (June 20) the SNAP Gallery will be printing huge large-scale prints using a steamroller just outside their studio on Jasper Ave.! The event, which will include live music, starts at 7 pm!

If music is what you are looking for, then you are in luck because Jazz Fest runs from June 18-29, and has a bunch of free performances throughout the entire festival.

It is also Aboriginal Day at Louise McKinney Park tomorrow (June 20)! There will be free fun from noon until 10:30 pm including music performances, and hands on interactive activities.

As seen on Global News Edmonton on June 19, 2015.

—Lindsay Shapka

Celebrate Summer

Halifax’s festival season heats up with music, art, culture, food and more

By Trevor J. Adams

Images-From-Tattoo_3265-06

A busy month of festivals and cultural celebrations begins with the Scotia Festival of Music. Continuing through June 7 at venues around the city, this event is a must for serious music fans, showcasing the best in Chamber music. This year, the lineup includes coductor Kenneth Woods, cellist Denise Djokic, violinist Giora Schmidt and pianist Simon Docking. A gala matinee concert at the Dalhousie Arts Centre on June 7 concludes the festival, featuring works by Elgar, Beethoven and Benjamin. Concurrently, Halifax’s vibrant Lebanese community celebrates its roots with Cedar Festival from June 4 to 7 at Our Lady of Lebanon Parish on Joseph Howe Drive. Festivities include a special mass, musical performances, art exhibitions, food tastings, games, dancing and more. June also sees the return of one of Halifax’s biggest and most popular festivals. Running this year from June 11 to 14, Halifax Greek Fest always attracts thousands to Saint George’s Greek Orthodox Church on Purcell’s Cove Road.June---Antique-Car-Show_admirers Lively music and dancing abound, along with cultural exhibitions and Greek cuisine aplenty. This year’s schedule features the Poseidon live band, a screening of FIFA Women’s World Cup soccer (Greece vs. Colombia), Greek language classes, a sommelier-hosted Greek wine and food tasting, and more. That same weekend, Memory Lane Heritage Village in Lake Charlotte hosts the Father’s Day Antique Car Show. Scheduled for June 21, (rain date June 29), the show is a rite of Father’s Day. There are dozens of lovingly restored classic cars, plus live entertainment and Kub Kar races. This month also features one of Halifax’s longest-running summer events: the Nova Scotia Multicultural Festival. Running from June 26 to 28 at the Halifax Seaport Harbourwalk at the corner of Terminal and Marginal roads, the festival showcases Nova Scotia’s many traditional-dancers2cultural communities with music, food, art, cultural exhibitions and more. The Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo closes out the month. Running from June 30 to July 7 at Scotiabank Centre on Duke Street, it’s the world’s largest annual indoor show of its type. The lineup includes an exciting mix of military and civilian drill teams, bands and performers from around the globe. This year’s highlights include the Halifax debut for Sweden’s Home Guards Band of Eslöv, His Majesty the King’s Guard Band and Drill Team of Norway, the Gym Wheel Team Taunusstein of Germany and the Paris Police Gymnastics Team.

 

 

Old-Fashioned Mountain Activities: Part 1

By Afton Aikens & Lisa Stephens

Marvel at snow-capped peaks from the cozy comfort of a horse-drawn carriage, hot chocolate in hand. Or strap on snowshoes and venture deep into a valley glistening in winter glory. However you prefer to play, ’tis the season to explore Canada’s Rockies in all their snowy splendour.

This four-week post series will introduce you to dog sledding, snowshoeing, sleigh riding and cross-country skiing. Once essential modes of winter travel, these activities now entice people looking for good old-fashioned mountain fun in the great outdoors.

Photo: Cold Fire Creek Dog Sledding

Photo: Cold Fire Creek Dog Sledding

(more…)

Hot Shopping: Shop Talk: Style Maven

Joan Druxman-Jones, the leather-clad, rock-star chic owner of Joan’s Accessories and More, says she’s “starting over at 73,” but that’s not quite accurate. Although her trend-setting boutique has been in its current home above Eyelet Dove for just two years, Druxman-Jones (mother-in-law of Winnipeg jewellery designer Hilary Druxman) has been in the fashion business for more than five decades. “I’ve seen bell-bottoms three times,” she laughs. Indeed, she’s seen it all, which is precisely what makes her Academy Road shop so special. Druxman-Jones has a discerning eye for hunting down beautiful bags and bold cocktail rings you won’t see anywhere else. Inspired by fashion’s constant evolution, her drive to find the next big thing is reflected in her thoughtfully chosen wares. “When I started in the business, you matched your shoes to your handbag. Now, there are so many possibilities.” 485 Academy Rd, 204-415-4564.

10 Weird and Wonderfully Hilarious Signs Across Canada

Photo: Alexander Somma

Everyone has snapped at least one photo of a strange, funny or just plain befuddling sign while on vacation. Here are some of the most entertaining we’ve seen in Canada—all of them official signs, for better or worse! (more…)

Canada’s Best New Attractions for Summer 2011

Art Gallery of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta

For travellers planning their summer trips in Canada this year, the regional editors of Where magazine have released their top picks for summer travel. The winners of Where Canada’s Best New Attractions for Summer 2011 represent the most exciting attractions – new, significantly improved, or celebrating major milestones this year. A diverse group of attractions from coast to coast, this year’s winners offer a wide range of activities and events suitable for any family, art lover, sports fanatic, nature lover or adventurer. Together, these attractions serve as the top must-see and must-dos for anyone travelling in Canada this summer. (more…)