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First Canadian Place

Maman Toronto Classes Up First Canadian Place

POPULAR CAFÉ MAMAN BRINGS SOUTH-OF-FRANCE FLAIR TO THE FINANCIAL DISTRICT

Maman Toronto First Canadian Place Financial District

Seeking respite from the harried pace of life and business on Bay Street? Take your breakfast, lunch or coffee break to Maman, a Riviera-chic café and eatery tucked away on the mezzanine level of the First Canadian Place bank tower. Chef Armand Arnal’s Southern-France-by-way-of-SoHo spot (it originated in New York City) opened earlier this summer and gained a loyal following for its fresh, homestyle recipes, ranging from remarkably light quiches to hearty sandwiches to flavour- and nutrient-packed salads. Maman’s more sinful options, of course, are similarly sought-after: decadent nutty chocolate chunk and Oreo-inspired cookies—among other things—make for the perfect accompaniment to a mid-morning espresso or afternoon cup of tea. And for those who just can’t stay away, the café is also open for weekday post-5 p.m. cocktails.  —Craig Moy

• Maman, First Canadian Place, 100 King St. W., 416-216-6767; mamantoronto.com
Map and reviews

Hot Shopping: Womenswear Pair Judith & Charles

Judith & Charles’ namesake owners

Fans of the minimalist look can rejoice at the reopening of the Judith & Charles shop in the Financial District. A bigger space for the eponymous brand of husband-and-wife team Charles Le Pierrès and Judith Richardson means a larger selection of womenswear, as well as greater colour and size selection for the duo’s mellow, earth-toned palette of clothing. A more extensive offering of curated designer brands is also available.  —Linda Luong

Hot Shopping: Get Suited Up (Again!) at Harry Rosen

Style powerhouse Harry Rosen continues to dominate the menswear market; each of its stores is a one-stop destination for all its customers’ clothing needs. The company grows even stronger this fall with the opening of its new location overlooking Queen and Yonge streets at the always-busy Toronto Eaton Centre. Just down the way from its previous shop, this updated anchor destination boasts private suites, a made-to-measure area, and expanded shoe, sportswear and denim departments. Catering to the folks on Bay Street, Harry Rosen’s First Canadian Place store has also been completely revamped and includes the chain’s largest tailored clothing section.

You Are Here: King Street West

Hallowed performance halls are the main attraction on this strip, but a variety of shops and restaurants entice visitors to stick around regardless of show time.

Roy Thomson Hall is neighbourhood landmark (photo by Neill Sturgess)

GEAR UP! A supply haven for almost every outdoor activity, Vancouver’s Mountain Equipment Co-Op has been in Toronto since 1985. The member-owned retailer sells gear for climbing, hiking, camping and more, plus ruggedly stylish apparel for men and women. The company also taps into community spirit by offering courses and events for active-living enthusiasts. (more…)

Contact Curated: Downtown

This year’s Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival features exhibitions at more than 200 venues across the city. Make the most of your festival experience by concentrating your gallery-hopping within specific Toronto neighbourhoods, such as the Downtown core.

At the Design Exchange: Guy Tillim's Apartment building, Avenue Bagamoyo, Beira, Mozambique (courtesy of Kuckei + Kuckei, Berlin and Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg)

Design Exchange
Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba (April 20 to June 14)

Another of Contact’s highly anticipated primary exhibitions, Tillim’s Avenue Patrice Lumumba series examines the effects of colonialism on modern history and architecture in African nations like Mozambique, Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

University of Toronto Art Centre
Suzy Lake: Political Poetics (May 3 to June 25)

Over the past 40 years, artist Suzy Lake has captured and expressed the female identity within the political, social and media context. She was also one of the forerunners of body-based photography. Lake’s exhibit at the University of Toronto Art Centre touches themes like beauty, femininity and identity.

Art Gallery of Ontario
Abel Boulineau: “Where I was born…”: A Photograph, A Clue, and the Discovery of Abel Boulineau (March 5 to August 21)

This series of gelatin silver photo prints in the Art Gallery of Ontario’s collection was only recently discovered to be part of Boulineau’s portfolio. A painter by trade, the French artist’s photographs reveal the stillness of everyday rural from 1897 to 1916.

At the ROM: Edward Burtynsky's SOCAR Oil Fields #9, Baku, Azerbaijan (courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery)

Royal Ontario Museum
Edward Burtynsky: Oil (April 9 to July 3)

The Royal Ontario Museum’s Institute for Contemporary Culture presents internationally renowned Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky’s collection of 53 large-format photographs, which explore the ugly reality of the oil industry and oil dependence in contemporary society.

First Canadian Place
Dr. Roberta Bondar: Within the Landscape—Art Respecting Life (April 4 to May 20)

Using artistic elements like line, texture and colour, this exhibition offers a look at diversity of patterns in nature viewed at a distance—for example, a herd of buffalo moving across a plain, shot from above by the first Canadian woman ever to travel to outer space.

Nicholas Metivier Gallery
Edward Burtynsky: Monegros (May 5 to 28)

Depicting the complex and diverse landscape of Monegros, Spain, this collection of large-format Burtynsky photographs explores the effects of industrial farming in the region.

Toronto Imageworks Gallery
Dianne Davis: Impervious (May 5 to June 4)

Davis’s works utilize tableaus and subjects that tell the story of a specific place and time to examine notions of fragility, transience and the brevity of life.

At Bau-Xi Photo: Brett Gundlock's yntitled image from his Home series

Bau-Xi Photo
Rafal Gerszak, Brett Gundlock, Jonathan Taggart, Aaron Vincent Elkaim and Ian Willms: Boreal Collective (April 30 to May 13)

The Boreal Collective features the work of young photojournalists who document social, psychological and physical inequities through Canadian-based narratives.

Leo Kamen Gallery
Roberto Pellegrinuzzi: Constellations (April 30 to May 28)

What you see isn’t what you get with Pellegrinuzzi. In this exhibition, each layered, translucent photo offers an atypical way of viewing a landscape.

TIFF Bell Lightbox
Creative & Technical Team, Pearl Chen, Meagan Durlak, Matthew Fabb, Priam Givord, Brandon Hocura and Ana Serrano: Becoming What We Behold: A CFC Media Lab Project (May 7 to 29)

This interactive installation features a geometric web of tablet computers showcasing user-generated content. Viewers become artists as they upload images and share photos in the literal web of interconnectivity that’s meant to mimic social media.

Gallery 44
Surendra Lawoti: Don River (April 30 to June 4)

Chris Boyne: Stillwater (April 30 to June 4)
Susan Kordalewski: Space vs. Place (April 30 to June 4)

The three exhibitions at Gallery 44 study landscape and place in various contexts. The first, by Lawoti, focuses on locals and displaced residents living in and around the Don River Valley in the midst of urban Toronto. On the other hand, Boyne’s works depict unseemingly colourful landscapes with dark histories told through audio narratives. Lastly, Kordalewski’s photos play with one’s sense of perception by placing 2D representations within 3D spaces.

At Birch Libralato: Lee Goreas's The Happy Hooker (courtesy of Birch Libralato)

Birch Libralato
Lee Goreas: New Works 2011 (April 30 to June 4)
James Nizam: Memorandoms (April 30 to June 4)

Lee Goreas uses golf balls to create a series of large portraits that demonstrate the “character” of ordinary objects—form, colour, surface and age reveal each ball’s unique history. In Memorandoms, photographer James Nizam takes viewers inside the oldest public housing development in Vancouver, just before it was demolished. Using leftover objects like doors, drawers and shelves, he re-creates a sense of place with a fleeting identity.

KWT Contemporary
Caitlin Cronenberg, David Frankovich: RED / Plus de Deux (May 5 to 28)

Using images selected from the New York Times’ Canadian Photography Archive, Cronenberg’s series at KWT Contemporary reimagines and reinvents the photos as a commentary on how Americans have viewed Canadian culture in the past.

Textile Museum of Canada
Peter Wilkins: Loop (April 29 to June 12)

Concerned with “pattern languages” in urban settings, Wilkins’ exhibition transforms man-made objects and structures into abstract geometric patterns through repetition and reflection.


View Contact Photography Festival 2011: Downtown in a larger map

*All images courtesy of the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival unless otherwise noted.

You Are Here: The PATH

The largest underground retail concourse in the world, Toronto’s PATH system travels beneath the Financial District with numerous entry and exit points. Many have been lured by its warmth in winter, plus shopping and sustenance. But it can be a bit confusing; follow our guide to ensure a smooth trip from one end to the other.

1. CENTRAL HUB One of the bigger, busier sections of PATH’s underground city is First Canadian Place. More than 120 shops, services and restaurants make it a popular destination for business people with a minute to spare. Top shops such as Harry Rosen, Tip Top Tailors and Birks ensure you’re well attired and accessorized, while respected restaurants including Vertical and Reds can satisfy any craving. This marketplace is as distinguished as its namesake skyscraper, which stands as the city’s second tallest building. 100 King St. W., 416-862-8138.

First Canadian Place's gleaming concourse

2. PRIME REAL ESTATE Near Bay and Wellington streets sits the cluster of Mies van der Rohe–designed towers of the Toronto-Dominion Centre. Beneath those buildings, the PATH’s green granite floors match TD Bank’s colour palette, and plush leather benches offer respite from the foot traffic. The retail range here offers Danier Leather and a Laura Secord chocolate boutique. Streetside, you’ll find the Design Exchange and popular restaurant Bymark. High flyers ascend even further—54 storeys, to be exact—to indulge in original Canadian cuisine at Canoe. 66 Wellington St. W., 416-869-1144.

3. ADDED VALUE If you find yourself surrounded by bright, white marble, you’ve arrived at the new Bay Adelaide Centre. This peaceful portion of PATH is home to a small but immaculate food court and some quick-stop shops; to the north it connects with the huge flagship location of The Bay. The futuristic feel of the underground matches the building that rises from it—the glass-walled building is the city’s first and only high-rise office tower to lay claim to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold Standard. 333 Bay St., 416-369-2300.

The exquisite vaulted ceiling of Commerce Court's CIBC bank building

4. SQUARE DEAL Commerce Court’s quadrants boast a food court, as well as healthy Four, an upscale restaurant where every dish is under 650 calories. Above ground, check out power-lunch favourite Far Niente plus the historic Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce headquarters—with its stunning Beaux Arts–style atrium—and the surrounding towers designed by I.M. Pei. 25 King St. W., 416-364-2281.

5. SPLENDID SITE Arguably the best-known southerly section of the PATH is Brookfield Place. Just a short walk from Union Station, its subterranean component has a food court and a few modest shops, but you’ll also find the entrance to the Hockey Hall of Fame—a shrine to Canada’s cherished pastime featuring exhibits, artifacts, trophies and more. Or, follow the sunlight up to street level, where soaring white buttresses and an arched glass ceiling create a futuristic cathedral-like effect in the Allen Lambert Galleria. 181 Bay St., 416-777-6480.