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february

10 Fun Things to do in Toronto this February

Some patriotic frozen art at Icefest.

Winterlicious
To Feb. 8
This citywide celebration of Toronto’s food scene is an excellent opportunity to experience a restaurant you’ve always wanted to try. Prix fixe lunch and dinner menus (ranging from $23 to $53) are available from restaurants like The Shore Club, Canoe, The Carbon Bar and Bannock, as well more than 200 other participants.
Various locations 

Prohibition: The Concert
Feb. 9, 10 and 14
Prohibition, a U.S. law banning the production, transport and sale of alcohol during the Roaring ’20s, was problematic, to say the least. It’s also romanticized for its iconic gangsters, flappers and jazz music. Albert Schultz and Mike Ross look back on this era in an evening of stories and songs.
Young Centre for the Performing Arts, 50 Tank House Ln.

Roundhouse Winter Craft Beer Festival
Feb. 10
Bundle up and head outside to enjoy craft beer from some of the best Ontario Craft Brewers. Live DJs and roaring campfires set the mood as you sample the stouts, lagers, IPAs, and more.
Roundhouse Park, 255 Bremner Blvd.

Come From Away
Feb.13 to Sept. 2
Audiences around the world have been captivated by the true-life story of a small Newfoundland town that comes to the aid of airline passengers stranded after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. This heart-warming musical sold out on Broadway, was nominated for seven Tony Awards, and has become a source of national pride.
Royal Alexandra Theatre, 260 King St. W.

Rhubarb Festival
Feb. 14-25
This showcase of new experimental works is now in it’s 39th year, and features a variety of dance, theatre, music, and performance art. Book seats for three or four shows each night—performances are structured in such a way to enable audiences to see as much as possible.
Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, 12 Alexander St.

Winterfolk Blues & Roots Festival
Feb. 16-18
Get your fill of urban, blues, rock, jazz, country, folk and roots music performed by more than 150 artists at this three-day festival.
Various venues

Canadian International AutoShow
Feb. 16 to 25
More than $100 million worth of exotic cars were on display at last year’s show, and 2018 is set to top that record. Luxury automakers such as Ferrari, Lamborghini, McLaren, Bugatti and Aston Martin are joined by the likes of BMW, Jeep, Audi and Buick among others, showcasing their latest vehicles and innovations. Drop by the Evolution Zone to check out (and test drive) the electric cars of the future.
Metro Toronto Convention Centre, 255 Front St. W.

Celebrating David Bowie
Feb.18
David Bowie’s 2015 death stunned and saddened music fans worldwide. Celebrating
David Bowie takes a page out of the artist’s own book, with futuristic reworkings of the artist’s classics that, like the musician himself, look forward, never back. Special guests and long-time collaborators such as Carmine Rojas, Andrew Belew, Mike Garson, Garry Leonard, Angelo More and Joe Sumner are featured.
Danforth Music Hall, 147 Danforth Ave.

The Artist Project
Feb. 22-25
Explore the works of more than 250 artists and designers from Canada as well as abroad at this annual event for art lovers, collectors, buyers, and curators.
Better Living Centre, Exhibition Place, 195 Princes’ Blvd.

Icefest
Feb. 25 and 26
What better way to celebrate a country known for its cold weather than with 20,000 pounds of ice? The Canada 150 celebrations spill over into a new year as the 12th annual Icefest transforms Bloor-Yorkville into an outdoor art gallery featuring frozen depictions of the Parliament Buildings, the Centennial Flame, Mounties and maple leaves—many of which will be created live. Vendors are also on hand offering a variety of food and drink, including “kiddie cubes” (ice pops with a toy inside) and maple taffy.
Village of Yorkville Park

Hot Art: January and February

Exhibits worth seeking out during your stay.

Courtesy of the Winnipeg Art Gallery.

Vernon Ah Kee: cantchant. Courtesy of the Winnipeg Art Gallery.

ACTS OF RECLAMATION

JAN-FEB

Two major exhibits at the Winnipeg Art Gallery explore the concept of land ownership through the intersection between Indigenous identity and sport. Boarder X features contemporary Indigenous artists from across Canada, drawing parallels between areas prohibiting snowboarding, or the surfer’s search for uncrowded waves, and the contested spaces of politics, identity, and land. Presented alongside this exhibit, Vernon Ah Kee: cantchant engages with territorial disputes centred around Australia’s beaches. Traditional Aboriginal designs and colours turn surfboards into works of cultural meaning. 300 Memorial Blvd, wag.ca

Drop Shadow by Nancy Kerr. Courtesy of Wayne Arthur Gallery.

Drop Shadow by Nancy Kerr. Courtesy of Wayne Arthur Gallery.

STRIKING SIMPLICITY

TO FEB 1

The Through Her Eyes Photography Collective presents an exhibit of black and white minimalist photography at the Wayne Arthur Gallery. Dramatically reduced design elements create imagery that is striking and thought-provoking, imbuing everyday items with unfamiliar beauty. 186 Provencher Blvd, waynearthurgallery.com

OTHER EXHIBITS

TO JAN 8: Our Land: Contemporary Art From the Arctic showcases artists from Canada’s north at the Winnipeg Art Gallery300 Memorial Blvd, wag.ca
TO JAN 19: Megan Krause’s abstracted landscapes act as a visual exploration of the effects of climate change and a rising global population in Fertile AshMennonite Heritage Centre Gallery, Canadian Mennonite University, 600 Shaftesbury Blvd, gallery.mennonitechurch.ca
TO JAN 19: Interna is a collection of non-objective abstract paintings by Dale Boldt. Mennonite Heritage Centre Gallery, Canadian Mennonite University, 600 Shaftesbury Blvd, gallery.mennonitechurch.ca
TO JAN 20:
Climate Changes by Mathieu Gotti explores the metamorphosis of animals in their environment at La Galerie inside the Centre Culturel Franco-Manitobain. 340 Provencher Blvd, ccfm.mb.ca
TO JAN 25: Christian Worthington’s Sermons To The Birds explores the influence of historical religious art in a secular post-modern world. Gurevich Fine Art, 2nd floor, 62 Albert St, gurevichfineart.com
JAN 6-24: 99 Pieces of Art on The Wall is an exhibit and sale featuring Cre8ery members. Pieces are priced $40-$200 and sold on site. Cre8ery, 2nd floor, 125 Adelaide St, cre8ery.com
JAN 6-FEB 4: Catch To Step is To Rise, a solo exhibition of new work by Montreal based artist Jeanette Johns, at Lisa Kehler Art + Projects. 171 McDermot Ave, lkap.ca
JAN 12-FEB 18: University of Winnipeg gallery, Gallery 1C03, displays video exhibition Moving Images. This group show features 23 short films and videos, including work by acclaimed filmmaker Guy Maddin. 1st floor, Centennial Hall, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Ave, uwinnipeg.ca/art-gallery
JAN 20-FEB 25: Hireath is a collection of pieces by printmaker Heather Lier exploring the nostalgia and wonderment of childhood memory. Martha Street Studio
11 Martha St, printmakers.mb.ca
FROM JAN 26: A collection of portraits by Michel Saint-Hilaire observes and questions our social environment, showing that we all have a story to tell. La Galerie inside the Centre Culturel Franco-Manitobain. 340 Provencher Blvd, ccfm.mb.ca
JAN 27-FEB 7: The Society of OUTstanding Artists group show features this collective formed through the LGBTQ Rainbow Resource Centre.Cre8ery, 2nd floor, 125 Adelaide St, cre8ery.com
FROM FEB 3: 
Wally Dion blends Indigenous craft with modern technology, drawing connections between quilts and circuit boards. Urban Shaman, 203‑290 McDermot Ave, urbanshaman.org
FROM FEB 3: Barry Ace’s Niibwa Ndanwendaagan (My Relatives) is a suite of Anishnaabe bandolier bags (or ‘friendship bags’) adorned with electronic components and a tablet screening historical family photographs and archival film of Indigenous peoples. Urban Shaman, 203‑290 McDermot Ave, urbanshaman.org
FROM FEB 3: The Manitoba Society of Artists exhibit Visual Voices in Manitoba, a group show highlighting emerging and professional visual artists in the province, at the Wayne Arthur Gallery. 186 Provencher Blvd, waynearthurgallery.com
FEB 9-21: Artworks featuring horses pay homage to the 43 horses recently killed in a barn fire in Ontario in the group show 43 Horses: Enduring Spirits. Cre8ery, 2nd floor, 125 Adelaide St, cre8ery.com
FROM FEB 10: Yapci Ramos’ Perras y Putas is an intimate dialogue through photography with women in prostitution in different parts of the world. Lisa Kehler Art + Projects, 171 McDermot Ave, lkap.ca

More Things To Do in Winnipeg:

Here & Now: Must-see and Do Activities During Your Stay
Why You Need to Visit the Canadian Museum for Human Rights
All About Winnipeg’s Convention Centre
Best New Restaurants 2016: What’s Hot Right Now for Food Lovers

Hot Dates in Halifax: 5 for Music Lovers

Blue Rodeo returns to Halifax on January 18th at the Halifax Metro Centre. Photo: Warner Music

January 18: P.E.I. singer/songwriter Lennie Gallant joins Symphony Nova Scotia at the Dalhousie Arts Centre.

January 18: With solid musical chops, distinctive song-writing and deep roots, it’s little wonder that Blue Rodeo remains one of Canada’s hottest musical acts. See them at the Halifax Metro Centre on Duke Street.

February 2: One of Canada’s biggest rock bands for two decades, the Tragically Hip never stay away from Halifax for long.

February 24: Tafelmusik’s Jeanne Lamon joins Symphony Nova Scotia for a celebration of Baroque music at Saint Andrew’s United Church on Coburg Road.

February 28: Celtic Woman, an ensemble of female performers, perform Celtic tunes at the Halifax Metro Centre on Duke Street.

Editors Choice
February 9: Southern gospel staples since 1939, the Blind Boys of Alabama offer an uplifting celebration of American gospel, roots and blues. Three blind singers, joined by four other musicians, offer timeless hits like “Way Down in the Hole,” “Soldier” and “Go Tell It on the Mountain.” The concert will be held at Dalhousie’s Rebecca Cohn Auditorium.