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Calgary museums

What happens when you clean an Olympic medal with Ajax?

By SILVIA PIKAL 

Photo by Jason Dziver.

1936 OLYMPIC SILVER MEDAL
At Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame, Helena Deng, manager of exhibits and collections, points out a display with two Olympic medals.

The medals are both the same size, shape, and are imprinted with the words “XI. Olympiade Berlin 1936.” Both medals belonged to Canadian track and field athlete John Wilfrid Loaring, who won a silver medal in 400-metre hurdles at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

But one of these things is not like the other. One is silver and shiny, while the other is discoloured and clearly damaged.

“Unfortunately, my mother cleaned the winner’s silver medal with Ajax Cleanser which badly tarnished it,” Loaring’s son, G. R. John Loaring, said in an email to Where Calgary.

“Ajax is a very, very harsh chemical,” Deng says. “It’s great for sinks, less so for silver medals. By cleaning it with Ajax, she stripped a large portion — if not all — of the silver plating off the medal.”

Many years later, G. R. John Loaring received permission from the International Olympic Committee Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland to obtain a duplicate of the medal.

Luckily, the same German company that made the 1936 Berlin Olympic medals was still in business and able to reproduce the original. The medals are identical aside from a tiny “COPY” stamped along part of the thin round edge. (And the copy is unravaged by Ajax, of course).

In 2015, when Loaring was inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame, his son shipped his collection of medals to the museum, which included the original and its shiny copy.

“We as Canadians have a very long history of success in athletics,” Deng says. “This medal — to have it displayed — is that impact story.”

A CANADIAN TRACK AND FIELD STAR
Loaring was born in Winnipeg and moved to Windsor in 1926. A rising track and field star, he won several medals in high school and on the Kennedy Collegiate Track Team.

At only 21 years old, Loaring competed in the 1936 Olympic Games in 400-metre hurdles. The very first time he competed in this event was at the Canadian Olympic trials. He was also the youngest finalist in the category, and thus surprised the world by taking home the silver medal. Following his success in the Olympics, he won three gold medals at the 1938 British Empire Games.

After the outbreak of the Second World War, he left Canada for Britain to serve in the Royal Navy. In 1940, as a radar officer on HMS Fiji, Loaring overcame gruelling and challenging circumstances. When the ship was dispatched to pick up civilian survivors of a torpedoed ship, Loaring was able to help resuscitate three children due to his training in Royal Life Saving skills.

During the Battle for Crete, their ship ran out of ammunition and was sunk by a German bomber. Thanks to the strength and stamina Loaring developed as one of the top hurdlers in the world, he survived by clinging to the wreckage for hours until he was rescued. He developed severe oil poisoning due to being in the water for so long, and was put ashore in Africa to recover. Still, less than a year later, he was back to competing in track meets in England.

Back home in Windsor he was an active athlete, worked as a coach and lent his time to a variety of sports organizations.

3 ways to get your arts and culture dose in Calgary

By SILVIA PIKAL

WHAT’S NEW AT ESKER FOUNDATION
Esker Foundation is exhibiting two major solo exhibitions from Canadian artists Vanessa Brown and Anna Torma until September 2. Brown’s The Witching Hour takes the viewer through a series of fantastic scenarios. In one installation you’ll find yourself feeling like Alice after she’s taken the shrinking potion, as you stumble upon a jeweller’s piercing parlour at midnight. You’re surrounded by whimsical and oversized earrings and other accessories that beckon you to a speculative reality where a weary wall clock naps at night.

Photo courtesy Esker Foundation.

Book of Abandoned Details features Anna Torma’s large-scale hand embroidered wall hangings and collages. Torma has more than 40 years of embroidery experience, and this exhibit presents major work produced over the past five years. One work, Carpet of Many Hands, is a stunning collage of found and collected fabrics and original embroideries. Hundreds of textile pieces culminate in a powerful piece that reflects on domestic space, labour and the value of women’s domestic work. Sign up for a free talk, tour or workshop, or download Esker’s free app before you visit.

GET YOUR FIX OF WESTERN CULTURE AT NEWZONES
Check out the “G’ddy Up!” exhibit at Newzones, which will be exhibited until August 25. This annual group show features work that showcases the western iconography we’re all familiar with, and also explores how the “Wild West” is shifting into something more cosmopolitan and vibrant. This exhibit includes photography, painting and sculpture from renowned artists, including Dianne Bos and Cathy Daley.

THE GREAT GRAIN ELEVATOR
Explore the world of grain at the Grain Academy and Museum in Stampede Park. Bring the kids to see a 35-metre-long railway model that demonstrates how grain moves out of Western Canada by rail and feeds people all over the world. Browse historic photos, films, replicas, the tools and equipment used by early farmers in Alberta and a working model grain elevator to get a closer look at the structures that transformed the grain industry and remain an iconic part of Canada’s agriculture history. Admission is by donation.

Hidden histories: Uncover the secrets of museum artifacts in Calgary

By SILVIA PIKAL

IF THESE ARTIFACTS COULD TALK
There’s hundreds of thousands of artifacts in Calgary museums, many of them stored where you can’t see them, biding their time to be on display whether as part of a new exhibit or to commemorate an occasion. They have histories just waiting to be discovered by the public.

And the ones you do see under glass in Calgary’s museums have stories you could never imagine — from a cigarette tin discovered recently in France that belonged to a solider who travelled from Calgary to Europe to fight in the First World War, to a 35-foot-long theatre organ that was squished into a basement with its pipes bent to fit — we give you a backstage look at the stories behind four artifacts from Calgary museums.

Photo courtesy Glenbow.

On the seventh floor of Glenbow, one of the floors containing the museum’s collections materials, Travis Lutley slips on a pair of archival gloves and picks up a slender cigarette tin. Its exterior is dotted with rust, but it’s in pretty good shape considering it’s been buried in dirt for almost a century.

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Uncovering hidden treasure from the First World War

By SILVIA PIKAL

Photo courtesy Glenbow.

On the seventh floor of Glenbow, one of the floors containing the museum’s collections materials, Travis Lutley slips on a pair of archival gloves and picks up a slender cigarette tin. Its exterior is dotted with rust, but it’s in pretty good shape considering it’s been buried in dirt for almost a century.

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The bell that rang when Chuvalo fought Ali

By SILVIA PIKAL

Exhibit in Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame/Photo by Silvia Pikal.

The year was 1966.

The place was Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto.

And the fight was between George Chuvalo and Muhammad Ali.

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The journey of the Kimball Theatre Organ

By SILVIA PIKAL

Photo by Jason Dziver.

On a Tuesday afternoon in March, Jason Barnsley, the National Music Centre’s collections and exhibitions technician, is playing some movie jazz on the Kimball Theatre Organ.

Barnsley is a trained organist who plays and tunes the assemblage of pipes, valves, cables and instruments that make up the instrument, which lives on the third level of Studio Bell, home of the National Music Centre.

Using both hands and feet to control the keys and levers, he can play the pipe organ, snare drum, xylophone, glockenspiel and several other instruments to give the audience the feel of an orchestra.

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Frida Kahlo’s life in photos and other can’t-miss exhibits

BY SILVIA PIKAL

FRIDA KAHLO’S LIFE IN PHOTOS

Frida Kahlo painting the portrait of her father, by Gisèle Freund/1951 ©Frida Kahlo Museum.

Famous for her vivid, imaginative and often surreal portraits of herself, Frida Kahlo explored gender, class, race and identity in her work. Now, until May 21 in a new exhibit at Glenbow, Calgarians have the chance to see another side of the famous Mexican painter. (more…)

Calgary Kids: Cultural Activities

How to get your kids away from the TV with fun and educational programs around Calgary

By Elena Redd

If your children watch television, play video games, surf the ‘Net or use cell phones, they’re immersed in what industry insiders call 360-degree marketing. According to the Media Awareness Network, children in Canada see 3,000 commercial messages every day—stamped on toys, slipped into movies, even plastered in school hallways. The idea these commercials send is simple: you are what you buy.

While you can’t remove your children from the modern age, you can enroll them in programs that sell a very different idea: you are what you know. We’ve scoured the city and found six programs that give children hands-on experience with art, music, literature, theatre and nature—with no commercial messages. (more…)

Calgary on a Dime, Part I

The best ways to spend $20 in the city.

If you’re on a budget but still want to get the most out of your visit to Calgary, here are our favourite places to experience the city for $20 or less.

FAMILY FUN

The Creative Kids Museum

The Creative Kids Museum

Telus World of Science Calgary
Calgary’s science centre has interactive exhibits on all the wonders of the physical universe, including energy, the environment, technology, outer space, and the human body. Inside, The Creative Kids Museum, gives young visitors a chance to become musicians, artists, stage actors, explorers and more.
Cost: $10 – $14.25

Butterfield Acres Children’s Farm
Get up close and personal with lambs, calves, bunnies, chicks and piglets. Kids can also take a pony ride, milk a goat or ride in a tractor-pulled wagon.
Cost: $9.99 – $12.99

Kart World
The half-a-mile long track at Kart World includes rides for adults and kids. The facility also has laser tag and a mini golf course.
Cost: $5.50 – $15 for a five-minute ride, mini golf $4.50 – $5.50

Calaway Park
This amusement park has 33 rides including its rollercoaster, The Vortex, which can be seen from the Trans-Canada Highway. Regular admission is more than $20 dollars, but if you arrive later in the day, you can save up to $17.
Cost: $16.95 after 2 pm; $14.95 after 4 pm.

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