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Attractions

A Sports Lover’s Guide To Winnipeg

As the birthplace of athletes from Terry Fox to Cindy Klassen, It should come as no surprise that Winnipeg is a major sports city. This year, as proud hosts of the 2017 Canada Games, there’s no better place To Find activities for every breed of sports fanatic. On your mark, get set, explore!

HEALTH START
Start a day of exploring right by fuelling up with these eats locals love. Grab a cold pressed juice from Green Carrot Juice Co (3 locations) to replenish electrolytes, or sip on a protein-packed smoothie. Manitoba-made GORP Energy Bars, found at most of the city’s health stores, will imbue your day with energy. Carbo-loading is the name of the game at The Original Pancake House, where stacks of buttermilk flapjacks rival Ryan Cochrane’s breakfasts.

 credit Joey Traa, Sport ManitobaCALLING ALL FANS
The Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame inside the Sport Manitoba building celebrates the Canada Games with an exhibit exploring the event’s 50 year run (pictured). Photos and artifacts from every province and territory in Canada—including medals and uniforms from the first Canada Games in 1967—are on display. For budding atheletes, the Children’s Museum exhibit Run! Jump! Fly! Adventures in Action provides a place to play. Get the little ones moving with activities like virtual surfing, a kung fu session, and a strength-building climbing wall.

WATER WATER EVERYWHERE
For a landlocked prairie province, we love our water—and Manitoba boasts more than 110,000 lakes. Diving, swimming, sailing, and rowing competitions are sure to whet your desire to make a splash yourself.

  • Get inspired by a day trip to Gimli. After taking a dip in the lake, head to the New Icelandic Heritage Museum to see an exhibit of stunning sailing photos (Jul 1-Aug 30)
  • Go swimming in the Pan Am Pool, or take a trip to Kildonan or St Vital Park to enjoy outdoor heated pools and splash pads for kiddos
  • Sit back on a guided tour of the Assiniboine river from Splash Dash Water Tours—or grab a paddle and explore the waterway by canoe
  • Get the blood pumping at Adrenaline Adventures with cable wakeboarding and beach volleyball
  • See a birch bark canoe used by this land’s first inhabitants at the Manitoba Museum
  • Prep for a day of sun and fun by picking up cute swimwear at The Hula Hut and Bra Bar
  • If you can’t make it to one of the province’s beautiful lakes, try local lakefish in one of the city’s regional themed restaurant. The Cornerstone serves pickerel in a French-influenced lemon butter sauce, while Fergie’s Fish and Chips at The Forks perfects the classic deep fry

GOLF GURUS
Think you picked up some pro tips from watching the competitors in action? Better hit the greens.

  • Practice on virtual golf simulators at Winnipeg’s only indoor Golf Dome
  • The mini golf course at Thunder Rapids is perfect for pint-sized putters
  • Lush 323 acre La Barriere Park boasts a 5700 foot long, 18-hole disc golf course
  • Golf balls emblazoned with the Winnipeg Jets’ logo from the Jets Gear Store display Winnipeg pride on the course

SUPER CYCLISTS
Between a thriving bike culture and slick city trails and paths, Winnipeg makes it easy to emulate your favourite mountain bikers, cyclists, and triathletes.

  • No bike, no problem—rent a ride from one of the city’s cycling shops. White Pine Bicycle Co at The Forks is centrally located, while Woodcock Cycle has the added perk of coffee from The Yellow Derny Cafe, inside
  • For a leisurely pedal, try out a bicycle built for two (or four) at Bee2Gether Bike Rentals at The Forks or Assiniboine Park
  • Take an art tour and see the city by bike at the same time. The Winnipeg Arts Council’s ArtRide (Jul 30) takes a scenic spin through St Boniface and St Vital. The Downtown BIZ’s A Moveable Feast tour (Aug 8) features stops at five different restaurants

PLAY BALL
Hundreds of ball players are fighting for gold during the Canada Games. Fans hit a home run of their own at these spots to dine, shop, and play.

  • Dine on Indian and Hakka cuisine while overlooking the diamond at Clay Oven at Shaw Park
  • Root for the home team by picking up swag at the Goldeyes Dugout Store
  • Batting cages at Grand Prix Amusements offer a chance to practice your swing
  • Hone your pitching skills on skee ball machines at hip sports bar Underdogs (pictured below)

    Credit Gary Barringer

    Credit: Gary Barringer

Walk, Bike, Run: 5 Ways to Get Moving in Winnipeg This Summer

So you’ve discovered Winnipeg’s incredible outdoor attractions and you’re looking for more ways to get outside and get moving. Have no fear! These fun tours and activities make getting active and exploring the city easy.

walking paths

ROUTES ON THE RED

A collection of self-directed walking, biking, and paddling tours along the Red River. Put yourself in the shoes of a voyageur and try out a half-day walking tour that follows the paths of the historic fur trade. Routes and maps found on routesonthered.ca

THE LOOP

Get a crash course on the city by walking this 3.5 hour self directed route that covers Winnipeg’s significant historic, cultural, and architectural sites. Download the route map at tourismwinnipeg.com

BEE2GETHER BIKE RENTALS

Find a willing partner and take to the streets on a bicycle built for two. Bee2Gether’s cute yellow campers can be found at The Forks and Assiniboine Park, with tandem, single rider, buggy, and surry bikes for rent. Visit bee2getherbikes.com or call 204‑298‑2925 for more information.

EXCHANGE DISTRICT BIZ WALKING TOURS

The entire Exchange District neighbour-hood is designated a National Historic Site, and there’s plenty of history to explore. Tours with themes like “Death and Debauchery” bring to light the dark secrets of Winnipeg’s early years—when it earned the nickname “the wickedest city in the Dominion”. Call 204-942-6716 to book.

DOWNTOWN BIKE TOURS

Pig out and get active at the same time on the Downtown Winnipeg BIZ’s Moveable Feast tour. Diners bike between 5 restaurant stops to sample eats at the neighbourhood’s prime restaurants. Visit downtownwinnipegtours.com to book.

More Ways to Explore Winnipeg:

Journey to Churchill at the Assiniboine Park Zoo
What to Expect at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Walk in Louis Riel’s Footsteps
Free Things To Do in Winnipeg

Discover Secrets at 7 Incredible Winnipeg Attractions

By Joelle Kidd

Though it is the province’s largest city, Winnipeg has plenty of green space. Immerse yourself in nature and discover the secrets of Winnipeg’s outdoor attractions.

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy.

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy.

PLAYING WITH POLAR BEARS

For up close animal sightings, the Journey to Churchill Exhibit at Assiniboine Park zoo is the place to be. The main draw is a chance to come face to face with a swimming polar bear, separated by only 15 cm of polymer. This massive exhibit covers 3,714 square metres, and is home to caribou, muskox, snowy owls, arctic foxes, and, of course, seals and polar bears, whose aqueous environments are constructed side by side to encourage interaction—buffered by another polymer wall of course.

The secret to catching polar bears at play is to visit in the morning when the animals are most active. Arrive before 11 am to get the best view of the bears frolicking and swimming. The bears’ underwater enclosure is placed over a tunnel, called the Sea Ice Passage, so the curious can get an up close look at bear bellies swimming above. Get your phone ready; you’ll want to snap a selfie when a polar bear comes to check out the crowd.

  • Assiniboine Park, 2595 Roblin Blvd, 204‑927-6000

Learn more about Journey to Churchill

Courtesy Travel Manitoba

Courtesy Travel Manitoba

JUST AROUND THE RIVER BEND

Winnipeg grew out of the meeting place at the Red and Assiniboine Rivers, as these waterways made trade and travel much easier. Though planes, trains, and automobiles have superseded birch bark canoes in modern days, it is still possible to take to the river by boat for a new perspective on the city. Splash Dash Boat Tours and Rentals opens mid-May, sending river adventurers off from its perch at The Forks. Take a guided river tour and hear historical insights on points of interest along the way. When the water is calm, canoe rentals are available for those who want to paddle the Assiniboine.

  • Main dock at The Forks Historic Port, 204‑783‑6633

Where to shop while at The Forks

Photo by Ian Carter.

Photo by Ian Carter.

AU NATUREL

FortWhyte Alive is a haven for adventurous outdoor fun and environmental education, all within city limits. Paddle or go fishing on one of five lakes, walk through the wetlands on a floating boardwalk, and hike the trails that wind through surrounding aspen forest. Eco-explorers can learn about Manitoba wildlife at the site’s interpretive centre, but the best way to get up close and personal is on a bison safari—throughout May and June, buggies roll out on Thursdays at 1:30 pm to join the herd of huge hairy bison that live on the prairie.

If visiting in May, you’re just in time to catch the spring migration. Join a weekly Birding and Breakfast event to take a hike led by experienced birding guides and compare finds over pancakes at the on site Buffalo Stone Cafe.

Photo by Dan Harper.

Photo by Dan Harper.

TIME CAPSULE

It almost seems as though time has turned back to 1815 … until someone pulls out a smartphone to snap a pic of the blacksmith at work. Other than its visitors, everything at Fort Gibraltar is meticulously reproduced and restored, from costumed interpreters that explain the ins and outs of the fur trade on the prairies to the cabins filled with bundles of animal pelts.

Take a tour of the Fort to learn more about the daily life of early settlers and voyageurs from the North West Company.

Want more St Boniface history? Follow the Louis Riel walking tour

Photo courtesy of Thermea.

Photo courtesy of Thermea.

SOAK UP SOME SUN

Getting outside doesn’t necessarily mean getting active—sometimes all one needs is some fresh air and sun. The perfect place to spend a day outdoors and horizontal is Nordic-style spa Thermëa, an outdoor oasis cradled unexpectedly in an old Winnipeg residential neighbourhood.

Deep relaxation involves cycling through treatments of heat, cold, and rest. First, a toxin-clearing sit in a sauna, steam room, or hot bath, then a dip in the cold or temperate pool, followed by a period of relaxation. After a soak in the luxurious outdoor baths, journey out to the “Forest Beach”, a secluded rest area filled with loungers, Adirondack chairs, and comfy hammocks, all tucked in a lush grove of trees—the city will seem miles away.

  • 775 Crescent Dr, 1‑855‑284‑3344

See a full list of Winnipeg’s best spas and salons

MLL Heritage Wall at Upper Fort Garry Park. Photo by Pattern Interactive.

MLL Heritage Wall at Upper Fort Garry Park. Photo by Pattern Interactive.

WILD WALL

Upper Fort Garry was an important centre of the fur trade for the Hudson’s Bay Company in the late 1800s, and though only the Fort’s gate remains standing today, the recently completed Upper Fort Garry Park commemorates the site with historical markers and an interactive installation set along the site of the fort’s original wall. The Heritage Wall spans more than 400 feet and depicts the history of this land from First Nations communities to the fur trade and European settlement. Watch the wall light up with an artistic LED interpretation of the Metis buffalo hunt—come at dusk for the best view.

For total tech integration, download the park’s smartphone app which highlights points of interest and provides information on the symbols on the Heritage Wall. Historical facts hidden around the park turn each visit into a scavenger hunt.

Learn how tech integration sets the Canadian Museum for Human Rights apart

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Conservancy

A WALK IN THE PARK

Assiniboine Park, the city’s largest urban park, becomes a hotbed of activity in the spring and summer months. Beautiful blooms grow in the English gardens and Leo Mol sculpture garden, which also displays bronze figures created by the renowned artist. With winding paths and benches set in shady nooks, these gardens are a perfect place to while away the afternoon. Those itching to get active can start up an impromptu game of frisbee or fly a kite on the park’s manicured lawns.

The best way to take a tour of the park is to hop on board the miniature train that has been operating, run by the same family, for more than 50 years. This little locomotive runs daily from noon to 6 pm, and for $3 will take you on a spin around the park’s perimeter.

MORE WINNIPEG ATTRACTIONS

Winnipeg’s Best Shopping Districts
Why the RBC Convention Centre is a Destination in Itself
Best New Restaurants 2016
Where to Shop Downtown

What to Expect at Winnipeg’s Gorgeous Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

By Joelle Kidd

With stunning architecture, a strong mandate, and an eye towards a future of purpose and hope, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights is leading the charge for human rights education.

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Rights for All

Entering into the cool, dark belly of the CMHR feels like the beginning of a journey. This is intentional. Architect Antoine Predock took painstaking care to integrate the building into the land, incorporating elements such as concrete stained the colour of Red River clay, and more than 50 species of indigenous tall grass prairie planted on either side of the building’s concrete “roots”. A massive screen displays video of silhouetted figures writing ‘welcome’ in 36 different languages. Nearby, a fossilized footprint discovered during an archeological dig of the museum’s site in 2008 reinforces this ground’s status as an historical meeting  place; this particular moccasin print is 750 years old.

It’s an impressive start to a visit, one that shows the care taken with every detail in the vast museum. The philosophy is holistic: from the building’s design to individual exhibits, every part of the experience points back to a mandate based around promoting greater understanding of human rights and prompting reflection and dialogue.

The CMHR marks a new generation of museum, one that promotes interaction and hands-on learning, that doesn’t shy away from technology, and is more interested in posing questions than loading visitors up with facts. This is not to say the museum is lacking in material: more than 100 hours of video, 250 artifacts and works of art (including 10 original art pieces), 2,543 images, and 100,000 words of original text are packed into the mammoth space.

Luckily — you guessed it — there’s an app for that. The experience-enriching application is free to download, full of content like an audio tour for self-guided wandering, the ability to sense nearby exhibits, a ‘mood meter’ that allows visitors to rate how they’re feeling and take the temperature of every gallery, and a GPS overlay that adds “hotspots” to a camera’s view of the Winnipeg skyline, pointing out additional attractions in the city.

Moving through the galleries is a conceptual journey from darkness to light, following criss-crossing ramps of backlit Spanish alabaster from the shady entranceway to the sun-dappled Garden of Contemplation, a basalt stone space offering respite and reflection, and up to the glass-walled Tower of Hope, the brilliant panoramic sweep of which symbolizes the impact of changing one’s perspective. Along the way, multimedia exhibits challenge, educate, and inspire. Global events, historic documents, deeply personal stories, and powerful works of art all share the space, providing a deep, rich, and multifaceted view of human rights. Without shying away from the past, the museum points to a better future, highlighting human resilience and ingenuity in the fight for all people to be recognized as free and equal.

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Courtesy Canadian Museum for Human Rights

What You’ll See

The Stories

Lean about historical and contemporary human rights issues through powerful personal stories.
Racial segregation in Canada. A collection of documents and a recreation of a 1940s movie house pay tribute to Viola Desmond, a black Nova Scotian woman who was arrested after sitting in the white-only section of a segregated movie theatre.
Holocaust survivor. Sigi Wasserman, like thousands of Jewish children in Germany, was sent along to Great Britain to escape the Nazis.
Inspiring youth. Craig Kielburger began advocating against child labour when he was only 12 years old. He went on to create an international charity, Free The Children, and the We Day initiative.
A singing activist.
Read about the life of First Nations singer/songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie, hear one of her songs, and see the Oscar she won for her song, “Up Where We Belong”.
Lifting the veil. See Quebec artist Andreanne Paquet’s photo exhibit of Muslim women wearing the hijab, which aims to promote understanding and express freedom of choice.

The Artifacts

Keep an eye out for these fascinating items on display.
A ballot box. This unassuming object has historical significance as the box that held the votes cast in South Africa’s 1994 election, in which Nelson Mandela was elected president.
Suitcases. See luggage belonging to Japanese Canadians interred in camps during World War II.
The world’s largest Metis beaded artwork. This record-holder stands 18 feet tall, made by artist Jennine Krauchi with thousands of antique beads dating back to the fur-trade era.
The Proclamation of the Constitution Act of 1982. The original document, signed by Queen Elizabeth II and Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, enshrines Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
A red prom dress. Worn by Mareisha Rucker, who organized her school’s first integrated prom in Wilcox, Georgia, in 2013.

The Technology

Try out these high tech interactive activities.
The circular basket theatre. An original film exploring Indigenous conceptions of rights and responsibilities plays on a 360 degree screen inside a theatre made from ‘woven’ wood.
Interactive table game. This digital exhibit reacts to shadows of visitors’ hands passing over it.
Lights of Inclusion floor game. A motion sensor tracks movements with colourful spotlights that merge and tremble when visitors interact.
Interactive study table. This long, touch screen table contains information and images about 16 atrocities from around the world.
Digital canvas. A 95-foot canvas in the Canadian Journeys gallery plays silent films that tell individual stories of human rights.

Visitor Information

Visit the Canadian Museum for Human Rights website for admission prices and hours. 90 minute guided tours are available, as well as self-guided audio tours for mobile device from the App Store or Google Play. 3-4 hours are recommended to delve into the CMHR’s massive array of content.

More Winnipeg Attractions:

Visit Wild Churchill Without Leaving Winnipeg at the Assiniboine Park Zoo

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Zoo

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Zoo

By Dunja Kovacevic

Tundra Treasures

Peer into the little explored but often mythologized world of the Arctic tundra with the Assiniboine Park Zoo‘s landmark exhibit, Journey to Churchill. Cutting-edge technology, top of the line research facilities, unparalleled attention to authenticity and environmental stewardship have set the bar for polar bear conservation centres, now recognized as the “Manitoba Standard”.

Mother bear and cubs by Keith Levit

Mother bear and cubs by Keith Levit

Majestic Manitoba

The story of Canada’s north is still a largely untold one. With environmental crises looming, the role that Manitoba has in protecting the legacy of the north and shaping the narrative of future generations is becoming increasingly important. By dazzling the senses and engaging the public, Journey to Churchill represents a monumental step towards Winnipeg’s growing reputation as a global leader in environmental and human rights.

The ambitious exhibit is both a love song to the untapped beauty of the north and a ringing call to arms. Opened in 2014, it is the first exhibit of its kind, aimed at education about climate change and conservation issues focused on northern species. According to Margaret Redmond, President and CEO of the Assiniboine Park Conservancy (APC), Journey to Churchill is “unparalleled in the zoo world in terms of its focus on northern wildlife and the immensity of the space given.”

Photo by Brad McCann

Photo by Brad McCann

Polar Bear Pilgrimage

Some 10-12,000 eco-tourists and adventure seekers file northward to Churchill, Manitoba’s Arctic jewel, each year in search of the Great White. Aptly named the “Polar Bear Capital of the World”, the wind-swept tundra has become a mecca for the world’s largest terrestrial predators, located at the crosshairs of their migratory patterns. Thrill seekers take to the frozen expanses of the tundra to catch a glimpse of these incredible carnivores.

While nothing can mimic the heart-pounding adventure of interacting directly with the bears in their icy environment, Journey to Churchill offers and experience of observing polar bears and other northern species undetected. Within the expanse of the exhibit are four main areas: the Wapusk Lowlands, Gatewa to the Arctic, Churchill Coast and the International Polar Bear Conservation Centre.

The Gateway to the Arctic contains polar bears and their primary food source, the ringed seal, in adjacent pools separated only by a thin clear wall. Expect dynamic interactions between the animals, who are able to see and smell one another through the wall, as they pivot and thrash in the exhilarating quickstep between predator and prey.

Perhaps most exciting is the Sea Ice Passage, a 10-foot wide acrylic tunnel that serves as the primary vantage point for viewing polar bears and ringed seals beneath the water. The exhibit functions as a “living laboratory” says Redmond, presenting rare and unique opportunities for field researchers to observe behavioural patterns of polar bears and seals beneath the ice.

Along with boundless roaming space, the exhibit features an on-site state-of-the-art research facility. The International Polar Bear Conservation Centre not only promotes conservation research, but is home to the only transition centre for orphaned and at-risk polar bear cubs rescued by Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship. At the centre, they are rehabilitated before being relocated to designated safe areas.

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Zoo

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Zoo

Staggering Specs

In order to begin construction on the exhibit, 86,699 metres of earth had to be transported. The tundra area of the exhibit, home to caribou, musk ox, snowy owls, and arctic foxes, covers 3,714 square metres. Polar bear roaming grounds within the exhibit span an immense 9,507 metres squared. Pools for polar bears and seals contain a total of 1,959,714 L of water. The indoor Polar Playground and Tundra Grill alone house some 238 people. The cutting edge 360 degree domed Aurora Borealis Theatre measures over 13 metres in diameter, and 5.5 metres high. Despite these scale considerations, the zoo is making every overture towards sustainability, even seeing a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification from the Canada Green Building Council.

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Zoo

Courtesy of Assiniboine Park Zoo

Gathering Ground

Parks and zoos have long been spirited gathering grounds for families and larger groups. With this in mind, the Churchill Coast area is focused on immersive family fun. Children can explore the Polar Playground, which is packed with interactive and educational activities such as a moving ice-mass floor that responds to footsteps. Parents can unwind at the Tundra Grill, a fast-casual cafeteria-style setting with massive windows overlooking Churchill.

Also located within the Gateway to the Arctic is the Aurora Borealis Theatre, which hosts a domed 360 degree viewing screen. An interactive video weaves the interconnected legacy between the people, plants, and animals of Canada’s north. At night, the room is transformed into a bewitching backdrop for storytelling and concerts while the Northern Lights play above.

Visit the Assiniboine Park Conservancy’s website for information on hours and admissions.

Read More

 

Experience the Out of this World

Sep. 13, 2016
By Naomi Witherick

Enormous vehicles roved in the distance, large notched tires gripping the icy ground. White clouds hung low in the air, veiling the giant grey mountains behind them. Their misty edges touched the horizon, blurring the line between the sky and the frozen white ground.

This could have been another planet. But I was right here in the Canadian Rockies on the Glacier Adventure and Skywalk tour at the Athabasca Glacier.

Columbia Icefields, things to do in the Canadian Rockies

Walking on the icy surface of the Athabasca Glacier.

(more…)

Niagara is for Everyone: A Kid-Friendly Itinerary

EACH YEAR, MORE THAN 12 MILLION PEOPLE VISIT THE NIAGRA REGION FOR THEIR VACATION OR GETAWAY. HERE ARE SOME FUN IDEAS FOR MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR VISIT AND KEEPING YOUR KIDS ENTERTAINED WHILE TRAVELING AS A FAMILY.

Hornblower CHP_4974

No visit to the region is complete without seeing the falls. The sight is awe-inspiring from afar, but it’s even better to feel the thundering spray aboard Hornblower Niagara Cruises, which carries poncho-donning passengers to the base of the Horseshoe Falls and past the American and Bridal Veil falls. Or experience the action from the observation decks of Journey Behind the Falls, which traverses 45 metres down through bedrock to the foot of the falls where 2,800 cubic metres of water crashes to the ground every second.

Feel like diving right into the water instead of just watching it? Waves Indoor Waterpark is an expansive playground with kiddie pools and slides that are as tall as three storeys.

Butterfly Conservatory NPC_6067Immerse with nature at the Niagara Parks Butterfly Conservatory or Bird Kingdom. The former is home to more than 2,000 tropical winged creatures, while the latter is the largest indoor free-flying aviary in the world. Experience animals of the amazon at the Rainforest Café, a family-friendly restaurant adorned in a canopy of trees and animatronic elephants and gorillas serving up pint-sized portions of hot dogs, burgers and pasta.

 

hershey-milkshakeHershey’s Chocolate World is a perfect spot for an afternoon pick-me-up. All manner of cocoa confections can be found here from chocolate-dipped strawberries and pretzels to cookies and milkshakes. Of course, there’s a lot of goodies to take home, too, including Kisses, Reese and Jolly Rancher products.

— Linda Luong Luck

 

 

 

 

RELATED NIAGRA IS FOR EVERYONE STORIES:

Romance at the Falls

City Secrets

Courtesy King + Bannatyne

Courtesy King + Bannatyne

Uncover a new side of Winnipeg at these historically significant spots that have been reborn as tourist destinations, foodie favourites, hip shopping locales, and learning centres.

(more…)

Discover The Calgary Stampede

By ADELE BRUNNHOFER

Rodeo is just one attraction at the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth. Photo: courtesy Calgary Stampede

Rodeo is just one attraction at the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth. Photo: courtesy Calgary Stampede

“Come Hell of High Water”—that’s the new motto of the 2013 Calgary Stampede, the city’s world-renowned, 10-day Wild West carnival pays homage to Alberta’s pioneer heritage and takes over the city from July 5 to 14. Despite the Stampede site being seriously affected by the Alberta Flood, organizers have worked around the clock to return the site to normal.

While several concerts held at the flood-damaged Scotiabank Saddledome have been cancelled, many aspects of the Stampede are expected to procede as usual. However, the information listed below is subject to change, and we will provide updates via Twitter and Facebook. Below is our up-to-the-minute guide to the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth. (more…)

Weekend Roundup August 10 – 12

Enjoy Calgary’s beautiful August weather at these great outdoor events this weekend and relax on Sunday by watching the Summer Olympics’ closing ceremonies.

AFRIKADEY! FESTIVAL Saturday Aug 11

On Saturday, the Afrikadey! Festival at Prince’s Island Park celebrates Calgary’s rich African culture, 10 am until 10 pm. Merchants and food vendors will be set up around the park, and the main stage features a star-studded lineup including Sudanese hip-hop act Emmanuel Jal and contemporary Ethiopian ensemble Krar Collective. Tickets $25 adult, $20 youth, available at the gate.

MARDA GRAS Sunday Aug 12

Experience that vibrant New Orleans Mardi Gras atmosphere right here in Calgary at this weekend’s annual Marda Gras festival. The event will be held between 33rd Avenue and 34th Avenue SW in the Marda Loop neighbourhood. (more…)

Hot Shopping: Editor’s Picks: Top 5 Winnipeg Toy Stores

Hatchin’ Grow Dino from the Children’s Museum Shop

Unleash your inner child with fun trinket and knick-knack stores at some of Winnipeg’s greatest family attractions. These toy stores will keep your kids, and yourself, amused for hours.

1. In the heart of the historic Exchange District, the stacked shelves at Toad Hall Toys will peak your interest. Pick up a Big Bang Rocket for a day of outdoor play. Simply fling overhead, let go and watch it fly sky-high, eventually hitting the ground with a bang. 204-956-2195, 54 Arthur St. (more…)

Get Golfing!

By Lindsay Shapka

Victoria Golf Course – Image courtesy The City of Edmonton

Golfing season is in full swing and the Edmonton area courses are in fabulous shape!

With almost 90 courses in and around the city to choose from, there’s no reason why golfers won’t be seeing green all summer long.

If you are looking for something new, three courses will debut this season. The Quarry, located along the river in the northeast of the city, will be the longest course in Canada reaching 7,600 yards from tip-to-tip, and (as the name suggests) is built on an old gravel pit. Coal Creek, located near Tofield, is built above an old coal mine, and Trestle Creek, located 45 minutes west of the city, will be part of a year-round family recreation facility.

For a complete listing of course names, locations, and hours click here.