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Art

The Season’s Hottest Shows

THE TOP SUMMER MOVIES, THEATRE, MUSIC AND DANCE

Shakespeare

The audience enjoys an actor’s performance in the heart of High Park.

Shakespeare in High Park

To Sept. 3

Canadian Stage marks 35 years of outdoor Shakespeare
performances in High Park in 2017. This year, King Lear, the Bard’s famous tale of a mad ruler’s downfall, will alternate evenings with Twelfth Night (or What You Will), a comedy of mistaken identity and gender. Whichever performance you choose, get there early to snag a good seat. High Park Amphitheatre, 1873 Bloor St. W., canadianstage.com

Beautiful: The Carole
King Musical

To Sept. 3

Be inspired by the story of Carole King, one of the most successful songwriters and solo acts in pop music history. Follow King’s rise to stardom, from her time writing with ex-husband Gerry Goffin to the launch of her solo career. Along the way, enjoy hits like “One Fine Day,” “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” and the title song, “Beautiful.”
Ed Mirvish Theatre, 244 Victoria St., mirvish.com

Billy Bishop Goes to War

July 1–Aug. 5

The Soulpepper theatre company
presents one of the most critically acclaimed and widely produced Canadian musicals of all time, Billy Bishop Goes to War. The production, written by John MacLachlan Gray and Eric Peterson, tells the story of Billy Bishop, a First World War fighter pilot, though a series of anecdotes examining his high-flying exploits and his ambivalence
toward war, nationalism and what it means to be a hero.
Young Centre for the Performing Arts,
50 Tank House Ln., soulpepper.ca

Toronto Fringe Festival

July 5–16

Programming is selected entirely by lottery, ensuring that new, avant-garde and established acts all have an equal opportunity to get noticed and try new material. It also ensures that shows are varied, novel and full of surprises. Several notable productions began as Fringe Festival premieres, including Kim’s Convenience, ’da Kink in My Hair and Life After. Along with theatrical productions, the Fringe includes dance, visual art, buskers and the FringeKids Venue, where kids pay only five dollars per show. Various venues, fringetoronto.com

Beaches International
Jazz Festival

July 7–30

More than 100 established and emerging musicians perform each year at the Beaches jazz fest, which encompasses genres from calypso to new age to Latin to blues. This year includes the return of Sounds of Leslieville & Riverside, the Beaches Jazz Latin Carnival and music at the Beach Village Kew Gardens. Also, gourmet food trucks fill Queen Street East between Woodbine and Beech from July 27 to 29.
Various venues, beachesjazz.com

SummerWorks
Performance Festival

Aug. 3–13

Each August, SummerWorks, Canada’s largest curated performance festival, hosts more than 60 theatre, dance, music and live art performances by over 500 artist in venues throughout the city. The juried festival is one of the most important places for artists to launch new works, both locally and abroad.
Various venues, summerworks.ca

Artist Spotlight: Alexis Lagimodiére-Grisé

where-magazine-1-2

Alexis Lagimodiére-Grisé grew up 30 minutes southeast of Winnipeg in the small town of Lorette. Now a rising star in the Brooklyn New York art scene, reflections on a youth spent in Winnipeg have inspired Alexis’s latest work.

While studying Fine Arts at University of Manitoba, Alexis lived with other artists in the Exchange District where he could walk around for hours seeking inspiration. Winnipeg architectural icons such as Union Station and Centennial Library influenced his work.

Recently, Alexis spent time searching through Manitoba’s archives and was drawn to prints of the former St. Boniface city hall. He began replicating and altering the backgrounds of these historic photographs, creating images that question and call attention to the function of temporality and space. From Jul 13-Aug 26, these pieces will be on display in this same historic city hall itself, now home to La Maison des Artistes Visuels Francophones. 219 Provencher Blvd, 204-237-5964, maisondesartistes.mb.ca

Ottawa’s Tried & True Shopping

By Chris Lackner

It takes creativity, adaptability, and perseverance to remain a prominent shopping destination amid ever-shifting changes in taste, trends, and clientele. As the country turns 150, we highlight top shops in the capital that have stood the test of time and have thrived for 20 years or more.

Kaliyana

Photo: Ben Welland

Kaliyana ArtwearSince 1987

Kaliyana Artwear offers innovative clothing for women, with sizes 6 to 22 available. Their contemporary, avant-garde designs are inspired by Japanese minimalism, simple and timeless, and driven by unique cuts, textures, fabrics, colours, and prints. Think unstructured shapes with lots of pockets, asymmetric lines, and layers. Most importantly, think comfort. Also, get footloose with international footwear products, including Arche shoes from France and Trippen from Germany.

515 Sussex Dr., 613-562-3676

Howard Fine JewellersSince 1967

No diamond in the rough, this family-owned store is celebrating its 50th anniversary! For one-third of Canada’s existence, Howard Fine Jewellers & Custom Designers has showcased timeless pieces of jewellery from around the world. Its showroom is home to a wide selection of treasures by Canadian and international designers, including Hearts on Fire, Rolex, Tudor, Tacori, Jack Kelege, Jeff Cooper and Furrer Jacot. Howard also offers custom design work and on-site repairs.

220 Sparks St., 613-238-3300

The Gifted Type

Photo: Ben Welland

The Gifted Type ~ Since 1981

The Gifted Type’s products go well beyond glossy print, with an eclectic collection of cards, novelty items, children’s toys, and other small gifts. Formerly known as Mags + Fags (which first opened in the ByWard Market), they have held court on Elgin Street since 1982 — amid a sea change in tenants and residents. Sister store boogie + birdie is right next door, showcasing rare jewellery (including handmade local designers), bath and body products, fashion items, baby clothes, children’s toys, candles, and Turkish towels. 

The Gifted Type, 254 Elgin St., 613-233-9651; boogie + birdie, 256 Elgin St., 613-232-2473

Snow GooseSince 1963

This purveyor of genuine Aboriginal Canadian fine arts and crafts from the Arctic and Canada’s West Coast has been a fixture on Sparks Street since 1963. You’ll find original works of art, including soapstone carvings and masks, along with a large selection of dreamcatchers, original Inuit prints and carvings, Indigenous jewellery designs, and leather goods.

83 Sparks St., 613-232-2213

Davidson's Jewellers

Photo: Ben Welland

Davidson’s JewellersSince 1939

This Ottawa jewel started to shine when founder Eastman Davidson set up a watch and clock repair shop in the family home before opening a storefront in the Glebe. His daughter Judy carried on the family tradition, and their namesake business moved to its current location in 1964. It continues to specialize in things that are shiny, but it has also crafted a glowing reputation for business ethics, service, and quality — not to mention a penchant for giving back to the community. Shine on, you crazy diamond!

790 Bank St., 613-234-4136

J.D. AdamSince 1988

This colourful, dynamic shop in the Glebe showcases an assortment of high-quality kitchenware and home accessories from over 100 high-quality companies such as Emile Henry, KitchenAid, and Cuisinart. It also carries bakeware, tableware, garden and patio accessories, ceramics, and chef gadgets. Smaller fare — including specialty food items, candles and soaps, bottles, vases, and cookbooks — make this a prime gift destination.

795 Bank St., 613-235-8714

Ma CuisineSince 1996

“Cook with it, serve with it, eat with it, Ma Cuisine has it,” they proclaim. And with good reason. Looking for a genuine Japanese turning vegetable slicer? They have that. A butter knife that absorbs the heat from your hand, making it easier to slice through? They have that too. And good ol’ cookie sheets and roasting pans? Check. Whether conventional cook or culinary mad scientist, you’re shopping in the right place. Ma Cuisine is a kitchen supply store with more than the usual muffin tins and rolling pins.

269 Dalhousie St., 613-789-9225

Manhattan West

Photo: Ben Welland

Manhattan West ~ Since 1992

You can save your travel dollars by visiting Manhattan in Canada’s capital. The same mother-and-daughter team have brought Manhattan to Ottawa for over 20 years, showcasing unique, edgy, and exclusive fashions from around the world. The tradition began at their former market location, Manhattan Marque, and continues at their Westboro shop, Manhattan West. You can travel the world of fashion by visiting this charming boutique, where you’ll find contemporary designs from New York, L.A., Italy, France, Germany, and Denmark. A one-stop shop for everything from casual to business wear, dresses to jeans, and exclusive accessories to stylish footwear.

322 Richmond Rd, 613-695-0517

Mrs. Tiggy Winkle’sSince 1977

Mrs. Tiggy Winkle’s unique collection of toys is probably the envy of Santa’s elves. Their original location opened in 1977 with the same product focus the local chain has today: well-made, creative toys that spark children’s imagination. They pledge a commitment to toys that meet a high standard for “both play and educational value” and “trusty old favourites that have stood the test of time.” Their classic products are showcased alongside new, innovative playthings. These toys are not only for the young, but also for the young at heart; a visit to Mrs. Tiggy Winkle’s will make adults feel like a kid all over again. Locations include The Glebe, Bayshore Shopping Centre, Rideau Shopping Centre, Place d’Orléans Mall, and Westboro.

809 Bank St., 613-234-3836

The PaperySince 1986

This colourful store in the Glebe has been hosting a non-stop paper party for 30 years. Gift-giving is made easy with The Papery’s array of greeting and holiday cards, artistic giftware, gift wrap, tissue paper (over 50 shades), ribbons, and gift boxes. They even offer a wrapping service. Party plan with napkins and plates and seasonal decor. Life plan with calligraphy supplies, agendas, journals, envelopes, and unique, vibrant colour stock. Plan for fun with colouring books, stickers, recipe books, rubber stamps, and origami to entertain the kids.

850 Bank St., 613-230-1313

Kunstadt Sports

Photo: Ben Welland

Kunstadt SportsSince 1988

Kunstadt Sports started as a small business in Kanata run by a clan of athletes and sports enthusiasts. They even operated out of the family’s home basement! It has grown to three thriving sports-equipment stores spread across Ottawa. Given our wintery capital, it specializes in snow sports, but Kunstadt also covers other seasons with an all-star lineup of equipment — from cycling and tennis gear to running shoes. Servicing for skis, snowboards, racquets, and bikes is available on-site, and Kunstadt even sells their own brands of skis and bikes. Their employees are athletes, too, as Kunstadt commits to employing accomplished skiers, bikers, tennis players, and fitness gurus. Sounds like a game plan for success.

680 Bank St., 613-233-4820; 462 Hazeldean Rd., 613-831-2059; 1583 Bank St., 613-260-0696

Octopus BooksSince 1969

This independent bookstore has multiple tentacles. It specializes in alternative and left-wing contemporary and classic books on subjects including politics, environmentalism, feminism, health and Indigenous studies. Author readings, book launches, and community classroom nights (guest lectures, debates, and more) make this bookstore an event destination. The original location opened in 1969 before moving to the Glebe 20 years ago, and the downtown location opened in 2012.

116 Third Ave., 613-233-2589; 251 Bank St., 613-688-0752

Outstanding Art at Audain

By LOUISE PHILLIPS

Audain Art Museum

Audain Art Museum

The sheer numbers are impressive. The Audain Art Museum’s  seven galleries of Northwest Coast art enshrine 200 works spanning 200 years of art-making in BC. Acquired by Vancouver philanthropists Michael and Yoshiko (Karasawa) Audain, the collection honours 11 indigenous cultures, from the Coast Salish in southern BC to the Tlingit in the north. Traditional ceremonial masks and textile art contrast with modern, genre-bending pieces by Bill Reid, Brian Jungen and Don Yeomans. Galleries celebrate the vivid marinescapes of E.J. Hughes and studies of Native villages by pioneer painter Emily Carr. Contemporary BC artists such as Attila Richard Lukacs and Ken Lum suit the minimalist design of this serene, airy space. It all adds up to a memorable journey through BC art.

Hot Art: Shifting Perspective

Photo by Leah Snyder Courtesy Plug in ICA

Ode To Miss Eagle Testickle by Ursula Johnson (photo by Leah Snyder)

To Jan 1

Group exhibition Superimposition: Sculpture and Image at Plug In ICA features artists Nadia Belerique, Valerie Blass, Ursula Johnson, Kelly Lycan, Ursula Mayer, Kristin Nelson, Dominique Rey and Andrea Roberts. The exhibit includes a variety of mixed media pieces exploring superimposition—a technique usually unique to image—in three dimensional space. The collection, which draws inspiration from fashion, film, architecture, and performance, incorporates bright colours, text and texture to create sculptural works that play with the conventions of graphic design. Unit 1-460 Portage Ave, 204‑942‑1043, plugin.org

Culture Crawl: Nuit Blanche 2016

EXPERIENCE ART AND CULTURE ALL NIGHT LONG AT NUIT BLANCHE ON OCTOBER 1ST.

Daniel Canogar's project Asalto Toronto

Daniel Canogar’s project Asalto Toronto.

Nuit Blanche, the all-night contemporary art event that transforms Toronto streets into a public gallery, returns for its 11th edition on October 1 featuring more than 80 projects. For 12 hours from sunset to sunrise, see the likes of sculptural works, dance, films, photography, interactive displays, and more at various locations including Nathan Phillips Square and along the Waterfront. Among the exhibits is Asalto Toronto (pictured) by Daniel Canogar, which is part of a broader display that examines metamorphosis and transformation, while Oblivion, including Pneuma by Floria Sigismondi, explores the cosmic universe as both a state of being and a state of nothingness. —Linda Luong Luck

 

 

Banff’s Best Buys

Sep. 19, 2016
By Where writers

Treat yourself to stylish souvenirs or get ready for a day on the trails, with these best buys in Banff National Park.

Banff shopping, Banff gifts

Image by Helly Hanson

Fall Style

Want a practical and stylish outfit? Helly Hansen’s Latitude 92 sneakers are on-trend and durable for walking or biking. Billabong’s (at Cascade Shops) light, ruffled dresses pair with loose-fit sweaters for cool nights. Whimsical jewellery from Cabin 108 (108 Banff Ave) finishes the look. (more…)

The Play’s The Thing

By Janice Tober

Winnipeg has long been known for its rich cultural scene, generating artists who dazzle the world with creativity in both the visual and performing arts. It is our theatre scene, however, that wins Winnipeg the cultural crown.

In a city home to the country’s oldest English regional theatre, as well as Canada’s longest-running French company, theatre is ingrained in the hearts of Winnipeggers who grow up experiencing thought-provoking plays produced by these venerated institutions. It is these early companies that have emboldened aspiring artists to create theatre groups of their own, in all shapes and sizes. WHERE Winnipeg offers a sneak peek of the plays that promise to be the most talked-about dramas, inspiring stories and laugh-out-loud comedies of the 2016/17 season.

RMTC

Royalty Lives Here

Winnipeggers often look to the city’s most prominent stage, the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre, to keep them entertained. It is the only theatre in Canada to receive royal designation, and is housed in a stunning Brutalist-style building in the Exchange District that commands respect. With a 58-year history, the company has a record of producing plays that hit the mark with audiences.

Steven Schipper, the company’s Artistic Director, states, “planning seasons is the only thing that I don’t delegate,” as he works to find plays that appeal to Winnipeg’s sophisticated artistic palate.

RMTC’s season opener, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (adapted by Simon Stephens), is a co-production with Edmonton’s Citadel Theatre. This Tony Award-winner, based on Mark Haddon’s bestseller of the same name, begins when fifteen-year-old Christopher is accused of killing his neighbour’s dog. The story follows Christopher, diagnosed with autism, as he works to clear his name and solve the mystery on his own. A strong and stimulating choice, this coming-of-age tale exposes Christopher’s vulnerabilities as well as his strengths with insight and humour. The show runs from Oct 20 to Nov 12.

Just down the street from RMTC is its second stage, the Tom Hendry Warehouse. With its own full season curated by Schipper, the Warehouse focuses on works that are more provocative and controversial than those seen on the mainstage.

The season begins with another play based on a novel: My Name is Asher Lev, by Chaim Potok. Running Oct 13-29, Aaron Posner’s stage adaptation is a thoughtful meditation on how an artist and his or her work can be driven by a compulsion that threatens both family and tenets once held dear. This co-production with Montreal’s Segal Centre is well-suited to the Warehouse’s smaller space where theatregoers are close to the drama unfolding in front of them. “It’s a perfect play for our intimate Hendry Theatre,” says Schipper. “Audiences embrace work that touches, challenges, and entertains, while asking important questions about how we may best live our lives.”

Courtesy Theatre Cercle Moliere

Courtesy Theatre Cercle Moliere

Multiculti Stages

Winnipeg’s multicultural makeup is mirrored in the city’s arts groups. In St Boniface, signs and snippets of conversation en français are reminders that French voyageurs settled here, and it is Théâtre Cercle Molière—the oldest French theatre in Canada—that best reflects this distinct Francophone community.

Geneviève Pelletier, Cercle Molière’s Artistic and General Director, chose to open the season with Et que ça saute!, an original piece by Winnipeg playwright, Danielle Séguin-Tétreault. Pelletier says she wanted to “kick off the season with a real side splitter,” and, with a title that translates to mean, “And make it snappy!” expect fast-paced dialogue and quick comedic timing. Centred around five people in an apartment building who are all searching for something in their lives, the play takes the audience through what Pelletier calls “the twists and turns of a day gone wrong.” The play opens on Oct 13 and runs until Oct 29 with simultaneous translation on certain dates.

In the late 19th- and early-20th centuries Winnipeg welcomed many Jewish immigrants and settlers to the city, many of whom helped create its arts institutions. The Winnipeg Jewish Theatre had its inaugural season in 1987 and has a history of showcasing original plays by some of Canada’s top playwrights—such as work by Winnipeg-born Vern Thiessen, recipient of the Governor General’s award for his moving drama, Einstein’s Gift—that highlight and lay bare the Jewish experience with emotion, comedy and accrued insight.

Running from Oct 27-Nov 6, the 2016 season opener is the Canadian premiere of Another Way Home by Anna Ziegler. Set in the summer during visiting day at Camp Kickapoo, on the surface Another Way Home is simply a witty story that catches parents in the midst of escalating conflict with their son, Joey. But amidst the barbs, the play examines what it means to be a family desperately trying to deal with a troubled son.

Courtesy Soul Pepper Theatre Company

Courtesy Soul Pepper Theatre Company

Bring the Kids

Manitoba Theatre for Young People evolved from Actor’s Showcase, an amateur theatre group that offered training for local talent, and grew with a new mandate to become one of the most respected stages in Canada for its creative, built-from-scratch productions and innovative children’s programming. Since its beginnings in 1982, the company has never rested on its laurels, winning its first award in 1992—the Canadian Institute of the Arts for Young Audiences Award—before earning a Dora Mavor Moore Award for Outstanding Production in the Theatre for Young Audiences category in 2007.

The 2016 season opens with Alligator Pie (running Oct 26-Nov 6), an original Dora Award-winning production by Toronto’s Soulpepper company. “The whole play is built around the beloved poems of Dennis Lee,” comments Pablo Felices-Luna, the company’s new Artistic Director, “so all of our fun is made possible through the work of an outstanding Canadian poet. And that’s how we wanted to launch, [with] all of the wildness you can experience at our theatre.” The play is full of infectious musical numbers and theatrical zaniness, but underlying the high-energy production is a message about the importance of friendship.

Courtesy Prairie Theatre Exchange

Courtesy Prairie Theatre Exchange

Go Grassroots

Since opening its doors in a ramshackle building in the Exchange District, Prairie Theatre Exchange has always been a small company rooted in the community. The theatre offered its rehearsal space to amateur groups and allowed them to perform on its stage between its own shows. Today, PTE is found in a downtown shopping centre, and it still belongs to Winnipeggers: in 2007 it opened its Playwrights Unit, where experienced and new local playwrights are provided with an office, the resources needed to put on a live reading or workshop, and input from fellow auteurs.

PTE continues its focus on work by Manitoban and Canadian artists with the play The Gravitational Pull of Bernice Trimble, penned by Canadian playwright, Beth Graham. Running from Oct 12-30, the play centres on Bernice’s daughter, Iris, as her Mom calls the family together to announce that she has been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s. The emotionally heavy story can be challenging for audiences, but when asked about this selection for the 2016/17 season, Artistic Director Robert Metcalfe explains, “This play was nominated for a Governor General’s Award in 2015, and I love it because of its fundamental honesty and heart in addressing some very serious subject matter—including the unique relationship between mothers and daughters—and the choices we make, both in parenting and in life.” Metcalfe has no need to shy away from difficult work, knowing that the city’s erudite audience is up for the challenge.

(more…)

Iconic Images

Aug. 22, 2016
By Naomi Witherick

Striking and unforgettable. The Canadian Pacific Railway’s posters have the same characteristics as the mountains they advertise. Both have been significant in the history of Canada’s tourism industry in their own right. And while you can’t roll up and pocket the peaks, you can at least take the vintage artwork home.

Banff, vintage poster

Attractive images promoted Banff and Lake Louise as stylish tourist destinations. Photo courtesy of About Canada.

But what’s the story behind the posters? When the company then known as CP Rail finished the railway in 1885, it had successfully connected the whole of Canada. From Ontario to British Columbia (with additional lines in places like Quebec and Lake Superior), the network opened the potential for trade, commerce and major economic growth. (more…)

Chihuly’s Blown Glass Works Decorate the ROM

EXPERIENCE THE BEAUTY, CRAFT, AND ARTISTRY OF BLOWN GLASS AT THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM

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Orange Baskets by Chihuly, Courtesy of the Royal Ontario Museum.

 

TO JANUARY 8  Internationally renowned artist Dale Chihuly has spent over 50 years breathing life into stunning blown glass works of art, displayed in more than 225 art museums around the world. The CHIHULY exhibit at the Royal Ontario Museum features several vibrant installations by the Seattle-based artist.

Fantastic Creatures on Display at the Aga Khan Museum

GET INTRODUCED TO INCREDIBLE CREATURES AND ARTIFACTS AT THE AGA KHAN MUSEUM

AKM_Marvellous Creatures_Cup_B

A whimsical creature decorates a cup from mid-late 17th-century India.

TO SEPTEMBER 11TH Animals—real and imagined—from legends, fables and classic literature, embellish manuscripts, and adorn everything from textiles and ceramics to jewellery and glass at the Aga Khan Museum’s new exhibit, Marvellous Creatures: Animals in Islamic Art. Among the items on display are a silver-gilded vase from 6-7th-century Iran. Discover these beings, and their part in art and history, through seventh to 21st century works from the Middle East, North Africa, and India.

Explore Photography at the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival


THE SCOTIABANK PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL INCLUDES VENUES ALL OVER THE CITY, WITH PHOTOGRAPHS IN GALLERIES, MUSEUMS AND URBAN SPACES.

Chillin'attheVoidCprint28x42_2015

At the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Sarah Anne Johnson’s Chillin’ at the Void is part of a series depicting outdoor music festivals as metaphors for Dionysian counterculture and the communal rejection of modern-day social norms.

 

MAY 1 TO 31 Toronto’s Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival draws attention to the creation and consumption of photo-based images and the challenging questions they pose—about the nature of memory, the formation of identity and much more. This year’s 20th-anniversary event promises to be as diverse and provocative as ever, with hundreds of exhibitions that, among other things, depict the industrial-scale accumulation of a newspaper photo archive (at the Globe and Mail headquarters), explore the scientific applications of photography (Edgar Leciejewski’s “scanographs” of birds at the North York Civic Centre) and use the banal to underscore the absurdity of superstardom (prints from the UofTDrizzy Instagram account, which photoshops Drake into mundane collegiate scenarios, will be installed throughout the city).

In all, the festival is both a snapshot of the state of contemporary photographic practice and a large-scale mediation on the act of truly seeing the world around us—for what it is (and isn’t), what it was and what it could be.

Edgar_Leciejewski_gartenrotschwanz#23.2007

Edgar Leciejewski’s ornithological scanographs—on display at the North York Civic Centre (5100 Yonge St.)—upend our expectations of scientific objectivity, favouring aesthetic concerns over strict representation.

 

Diane Arbus_A Young Man and his Pregnant Wife in Washington Square Park

Diane Arbus’s A Young Man and His Pregnant Wife in Washington Square Park is one of 300-plus images in “Outsiders: American Photography and Film, 1950s–1980s,” a monumental Art Gallery of Ontario group show that captures the changing face of the U.S. during a period of social and political upheaval.