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Art Vancouver

Vancouver Art Gallery: Transits and Returns

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT

“Skin Country” by Carol McGregor (Photo by Louis Lim. Image courtesy the artist)

To Feb. 23, 2019 For a unique insight into the nations of the Pacific region, stroll over to Transits and Returns at the Vancouver Art Gallery. In collaboration with Brisbane’s Institute of Modern Art, this transportive exhibit connects 21 Indigenous artists—including local First Nations—who tackle themes of movement, kinship, territory and representation. Carol McGregor’s remarkable possum-skin map, “Skin Country,” depicts indigenous plants used by Aboriginal communities near Brisbane, while Taloi Havini’s four-channel video “Habitat III” reveals the tense relationship between Australia and Bougainville, an autonomous region of Papua New Guinea. Chantal Fraser, of Samoan descent, manipulates objects to challenge cultural interpretations: don’t miss “The Way,” a dazzling rhinestone-studded wind turbine. Through their practices, the artists dive headfirst into ancestral roots and travel routes. And it’s a trip worth taking.

Open-Air Art

By SHERI RADFORD

Oct. 2019

“217.5 Arc x 13” by Bernar Venet, at Sunset Beach (Photo by KK Law)

Thanks to the Vancouver Biennale, locals are accustomed to larger-than-life artwork springing up all around the city. Some of the pieces remain on a permanent basis, such as Marcus Bowcott’s “Trans Am Totem” near Science World, while others eventually move on to the next destination. The fourth iteration of this alfresco exhibition runs from 2018 to 2020, and it includes works such as “Paradise Has Many Gates” by Ajlan Gharem, which appears to be a mosque constructed from chain-link fence, right in Vanier Park. Another visiting piece is Maskull Lasserre’s “Acoustic Anvil: A Small Weight to Forge the Sea,” a colossal installation in Leg-In-Boot Square. The outdoor locations guarantee accessibility for all. Just remember to pack your walking shoes—and an umbrella.

Elissa Cristall Gallery: From Here

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT

Oct. 2019

“From Here #1” by Lesley Finlayson

Painting may not be on your list of outdoor hobbies, but after seeing Lesley Finlayson’s work, you might be tempted to branch out. The Scottish-born artist is a fan of the French en plein air technique, meaning the landscape is both her subject and her studio. From Here at Elissa Cristall Gallery (Oct. 3 to 26) focuses on the relationships between light, land and water. Streams of colour splash across each canvas, and it’s not hard to imagine Finlayson embracing every type of weather. Want to give it a whirl? Set up your easel now, before Raincouver—Vancouver’s soggy alter ego—strikes again.

Before Ever After at Jennifer Kostuik Gallery

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT

Sep. 2019

“Twelve Giraffes, Maasai Mara, Kenya” by David Burdeny

African animals and their wild homes take centre stage in David Burdeny’s Before Ever After: Photographs from Kenya and Tanzania. Motivated by the threat of mass extinction, Burdeny is on a mission to show that animals are worthy of our attention—and our protection. Against stunning backdrops, a coalition of cheetahs lines up in formation.  A mini-pride of lion cubs basks in the sun. An elephant wanders through grassy plains with her calf. A tower of giraffes—yes, that’s what a group of giraffes is called—struts across the Maasai Mara National Reserve. If you’ve ever been on safari, you’ll recognize these sights. But there’s no need for a flight to Africa: Burdeny’s striking collection of photographs is on display from Sep. 13 to Oct. 6, at Jennifer Kostuik Gallery. 

Definitely Dalí: Another Dimension

By HANNAH POAROS-MCDERMOTT

Sep. 2019

“Dalinian Dancer” can be found at Thurlow Street and Alberni (Photo by Caroline Toth)

Seen anything strange recently? Two large Dalí sculptures have spent the summer on Vancouver’s sidewalks as part of Chali-Rosso Gallery’s annual Definitely Dalí exhibit. “Space Venus,” hard to miss at 3.5 m (11 ft) tall, towers over visitors at the corner of West Hastings Street and Hornby until mid-January 2020.  At Thurlow Street and Alberni, “Dalinian Dancer” (pictured) comes to life thanks to augmented reality: download the dedicated app for an uncanny experience. Check out this swirly sculpture at its sidewalk location until Sep. 18, or follow it to Oakridge Centre, where it will be on display from Sep. 19 to Oct. 14 as part of Meet the Masters: From Picasso to Pop Art. Dreaming of more Dalí? Take a peek inside Chali-Rosso Gallery, where over 100 works by the Spanish artist are on display. So surreal. 

 

Vancouver’s Perfect Proposal Spot

By SHERI RADFORD
Feb. 2018

Dennis Oppenheim’s “Engagement” comments on the balancing act that is any successful marriage. (Photo by Sheri Radford)

Ready to pop the question? The city’s most picturesque spot for proposals is at Sunset Beach (Map 1: C3), with the ocean and giant Engagement sculpture as a backdrop. For maximum romance, time it all for sunset.