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6 Effortlessly Romantic Things to Do in Toronto

IT’S EASY TO CREATE EVERLASTING MEMORIES WITH YOUR SWEETHEART WITH THESE NO-FUSS ROMANTIC THINGS TO DO IN TORONTO

Romantic-Things-to-Do-in-Toronto-Valentines-Day

Afternoon tea at Deq, a visit to the AGO, and skating at Nathan Phillips Square—just a few of Toronto’s effortlessly romantic things to do

Forget the chilly temperatures outside. Instead, embrace winter and its seasonal delights. And embrace each other, too by exploring a new destination—or revisiting a longtime favourite—and indulging in a few easy-to-do, good-for-two activities.

TAKE A WALK
It may be chilly outside, but just imagine strolling hand in (gloved) hand beneath snow-capped trees in High Park or Trinity Bellwoods Park. Or meander through Allan Gardens Conservatory, a downtown greenhouse that’s home to an assortment of palms, cacti, succulents, camellias and jasmine.

LACE UP YOUR SKATES
Alternatively, glide across the ice at a public skating rink. Nathan Phillips Square is centrally located in front of City Hall, while the Natrel Rink at Harbourfront Centre hosts DJ Skate Nights every Saturday.

HAVE A CUPPA
Savour some midday delight with sandwiches, scones and pastries during afternoon tea at DEQ Terrace and Lounge. Or, for more indulgence (you’re on holiday after all), swap the tea for a glass of bubbly or mug of sipping chocolate at MoRoCo Chocolat.

LEAVE ‘EM IN STITCHES
A sense of humour is often a trait individuals seek in their partners, so show your funny bone by booking an evening of witty social commentary and slapstick with the city’s top improv crew at The Second City.

THE RHYTHM IS GONNA GET YOU
Seduce your special someone with sultry dance moves. Every weekend, Lula Lounge offers free salsa lessons for beginners, as well as live jazz music on Friday nights.

AN AFTERNOON OF CULTURE
Peruse the collections at some of the city’s most enriching institutions, including the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Royal Ontario Museum. The former boasts tens of thousands works spanning European masters to the Group of Seven, while the latter has 40 galleries representing textiles, Chinese sculpture and more.

—Linda Luong

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