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Alberta

Dining spotlight: Holly Parks of Vintage Group

By SILVIA PIKAL 

Photo by Jasmine Croteau.

Holly Parks loves a challenge — especially when the clock is ticking. So the hospitality industry feels like home.

“It’s 100 percent a perfect fit for me,” Parks says. “I like to be busy. Even in my own home, I’m always putzing. It drives my husband crazy that I can’t stop doing things and sit and enjoy. I’m always going and fluttering about.”

As the operations manager of Vintage Group, Parks oversees their downtown properties, including Vintage Chophouse. She’s also got her hands full travelling to Lethbridge once a week in support of a new concept Vintage Group is opening there in the summer. And with a steakhouse opening in Mahogany in 2019, there’s no slowing down.

Born and raised in Nova Scotia, Parks moved to Calgary in 2000 eager to make her mark in Calgary’s hospitality scene. She got her start with Creative Restaurants, and then the Stampede Casino, before joining Vintage Group in 2010.

The folks who come through the doors keep her energized in an industry known for its fast pace and long hours.

“The guests make our business. Vintage is celebrating 15 years this year. We’ve weathered some major recessions and the only way we’ve stayed in business and continued such great success is because of our guests. We’re loyal to them and they’re very loyal to us.”

Watching her team grow is a big part of what she loves about her job.

“It’s exciting to watch the evolution and growth of younger employees — to watch them grow through the ranks — starting as a server or bartender and moving into management and seeing their great success and rise within our group or outside of our group.”

Luckily for Parks, she’s been able to find a career that ensures she’s able to follow the big passions of her life: food, wine and travel. She’s always learning more, and both for work and fun she travels the globe in search of the next big dish, or new wine, Vintage Group can bring to their guests.

“My work allows me to travel all over the world to some really great places, sometimes because of work, and sometimes on my own with my husband and my family,” Parks says. “Any travel you do changes you as an individual. You see how other people live and you see what other people’s core values are, which you bring back with you.”

Hot Art Round-Up: Aug 17 – 18

By HOT ART YYC

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17

Beakerhead Store opening day
1405 – 4 St SW: 9 am – 5 pm

Out to Pasture / Karaoke + BBQ Fundraiser
TRUCK Contemporary Art in Calgary, 7 pm – midnight

The Magic of Material: Exhibition Tour with Naomi Potter
Esker Foundation, 6 – 7 pm

 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 18

Annual Garage Sale
Kensington Art Supply, 9 am – 2 pm

Pottery Seconds & Samples sale
Galleria Inglewood, 10 am – 5:30 pm

Farmers & Makers Market at cspace
cSPACE, 10 am – 3 pm

Calgary Comics and Pop Culture Swap + Shop
Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association, 10 am – 3 pm

What happens when you clean an Olympic medal with Ajax?

By SILVIA PIKAL 

Photo by Jason Dziver.

1936 OLYMPIC SILVER MEDAL
At Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame, Helena Deng, manager of exhibits and collections, points out a display with two Olympic medals.

The medals are both the same size, shape, and are imprinted with the words “XI. Olympiade Berlin 1936.” Both medals belonged to Canadian track and field athlete John Wilfrid Loaring, who won a silver medal in 400-metre hurdles at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

But one of these things is not like the other. One is silver and shiny, while the other is discoloured and clearly damaged.

“Unfortunately, my mother cleaned the winner’s silver medal with Ajax Cleanser which badly tarnished it,” Loaring’s son, G. R. John Loaring, said in an email to Where Calgary.

“Ajax is a very, very harsh chemical,” Deng says. “It’s great for sinks, less so for silver medals. By cleaning it with Ajax, she stripped a large portion — if not all — of the silver plating off the medal.”

Many years later, G. R. John Loaring received permission from the International Olympic Committee Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland to obtain a duplicate of the medal.

Luckily, the same German company that made the 1936 Berlin Olympic medals was still in business and able to reproduce the original. The medals are identical aside from a tiny “COPY” stamped along part of the thin round edge. (And the copy is unravaged by Ajax, of course).

In 2015, when Loaring was inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame, his son shipped his collection of medals to the museum, which included the original and its shiny copy.

“We as Canadians have a very long history of success in athletics,” Deng says. “This medal — to have it displayed — is that impact story.”

A CANADIAN TRACK AND FIELD STAR
Loaring was born in Winnipeg and moved to Windsor in 1926. A rising track and field star, he won several medals in high school and on the Kennedy Collegiate Track Team.

At only 21 years old, Loaring competed in the 1936 Olympic Games in 400-metre hurdles. The very first time he competed in this event was at the Canadian Olympic trials. He was also the youngest finalist in the category, and thus surprised the world by taking home the silver medal. Following his success in the Olympics, he won three gold medals at the 1938 British Empire Games.

After the outbreak of the Second World War, he left Canada for Britain to serve in the Royal Navy. In 1940, as a radar officer on HMS Fiji, Loaring overcame gruelling and challenging circumstances. When the ship was dispatched to pick up civilian survivors of a torpedoed ship, Loaring was able to help resuscitate three children due to his training in Royal Life Saving skills.

During the Battle for Crete, their ship ran out of ammunition and was sunk by a German bomber. Thanks to the strength and stamina Loaring developed as one of the top hurdlers in the world, he survived by clinging to the wreckage for hours until he was rescued. He developed severe oil poisoning due to being in the water for so long, and was put ashore in Africa to recover. Still, less than a year later, he was back to competing in track meets in England.

Back home in Windsor he was an active athlete, worked as a coach and lent his time to a variety of sports organizations.

Hot Art Round-Up: Aug 9 – 11

By HOT ART YYC

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9

Rodney Guitarsplat: Blues Stories and Other Tales
The Blackboard Gallery, cSPACE: 5 – 8 pm

Science of Cannabis
Adults Only Night at TELUS Spark, 6 – 10 pm

 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10

Bob Bahan Graffiti Mural Unveiling
Antyx Community Arts, Bob Bahan Aquatic & Fitness Centre, 1 – 5 pm

Truck Stop by Machine de Cirque + Happenings 13
Arts Commons, Calgary Municipal Building: 5 – 10 pm

Southcentre Summer Night Markets
Southcentre, August 10 & 11, 5 – 10 pm

Inglewood Night Market
Inglewood, 5 – 11 pm

 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11

Opening Reception: If Bees Are Few
Leighton Art Centre, 2 – 4 pm

Scott Everingham, Shawn Evans, Serena Beaulieu: A Small Painting Show
VivianeArt, 2 – 5 pm

Ninth Annual Art in the Garden
3443 Kerry Park Rd SW, 10 am – 4 pm

3 Must-Try Dishes in Calgary

By SILVIA PIKAL 

BRIDGETTE BAR’S GARLIC BREAD
Garlic bread is a heavenly combination of some of life’s best foods — bread, butter and garlic. And just when you think it can’t get any better, enter the garlic bread on Bridgette Bar’s snack menu. It’s one of those dishes you think about long after you gobble it down and leave the restaurant (and wish you’d ordered one for a midnight snack). Each roll is filled with cheese curds and brushed with garlic butter before being sprinkled generously with parmesan and chives. It also earned the title of one of “Where Calgary’s Favourite Dishes” in this year’s Where to Dine Awards.

Photo by Jasmine Croteau.

SILVER DRAGON’S SIU MAI

With a well-deserved reputation in Calgary for exceptional dim sum, Silver Dragon offers the ideal brunch experience. Make sure you arrive before noon — the dining room fills up quickly and line-ups are to be expected. Then take your seat and savour each bite from the roaming food carts. Try one of their enduring favourites, the siu mai, a winning combination of juicy, flavourful pork and shrimp in an open-top dumpling.

Photo by Laura Johnston. 

BRIGGS’ NEWF’S POUTINE
The most popular appetizer at Briggs Kitchen and Bar, the Newf’s Poutine is stacked high with east coast lobster. A winner of the 2016 Gravy Bowl for Poutine Week, this dish is a must for poutine lovers and anyone unable to resist the temptation of a generous heaping of lobster on crispy fries, topped with Quebec cheese curds and slathered in lobster cream instead of traditional gravy. You could easily share this dish, but you won’t want to.

Photo by Silvia Pikal. 

Hot Art Round-Up: Aug 2 – 5

By HOT ART YYC

THURSDAY, AUG 2

1st Art Exhibition for Ignite – An Opioid Awareness Project
Ignite, 7 – 10 pm

Free First Thursday Night
Glenbow Museum, 5 – 9 pm

 

FRIDAY, AUG 3

Sherry Telle: Abstract to Realism…and back
Framed on Fifth, 6 – 9 pm

 

SATURDAY, AUG 4

Inglewood Sunfest
Inglewood, 11 am – 6 pm

Floating Lantern Peace Ceremony 2018
Olympic Plaza, 8 – 10 pm

 

SUNDAY, AUG 5

Secrets of Chinatown
Calgary Chinese Cultural Centre, 1 – 3 pm

Cariwest Festival

Are you ready for the very best of Cariwest?

Experience a full weekend of Caribbean colours, food, and music! The biggest and most popular festival of its kind in Western Canada, the Cariwest Caribbean Arts Festival promotes Caribbean culture through music and dance.

This colourful and vibrant festival is back for another year—and with a slight change: they’ve moved to the Federal Building Plaza, near the Alberta Legislature grounds. Groove with the street parade down Jasper Ave. and then join in at the Federal Plaza for a grand celebration in the bright and bustling Caribbean Village.

Festival dates: August 10–12, 2018
Location: Federal Building Plaza, 9820-107 St.
For more info, visit the Cariwest festival website.

Schedule of Events

Friday, August 10

Friday Extravaganza—7 pm
Get a sneak-peek of the creative and glamorous parade costumes, plus a chance to enjoy enticing cuisine and vibrant Caribbean musical rhythms.

Saturday, August 11

Parade—starts 12 pm (Noon)
Let the pulsating beats of the Caribbean and the vibrantly coloured costumes carry you down Jasper Ave.! This favourite in Edmonton’s festival scene includes masqueraders in brightly coloured costumes dancing to the rhythms that are synonymous with the Caribbean.

Caribbean Village—12 pm–11 pm
Festivities continue at Federal Building Plaza (aka the Caribbean Village). Enjoy the tastes of the Caribbean with authentic cuisine like jerk chicken and roti. On the main stage, there will be performances from local artists with everything from reggae to soca. Plus, check out the market for its collection of art, crafts, and fashion.

Island Rave—starts 10 pm
Head to Union Hall to party all night with Jeff Jam, Fyah Blazin, Drew Atlas, and Marcus G. This official after-party promises the best in soca and island music. Tickets available online, or last-minute tickets will be available at the Cariwest info booth on the event grounds.

Sunday, August 12

Caribbean Village—12 pm–9 pm
Head back to the Plaza’s Village as it transforms to the laidback island feel. Sip and savour a featured drink in the Appleton’s Rum Gardens.

15 Things to do in Calgary in August

By KYLEE PEDERSEN

Get the most out of the summer with this list of great things to do in Calgary!

Photo courtesy Heritage Park.

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING ERNEST
Presented by the Calgary Young People’s Theatre comes Oscar Wilde’s “trivial comedy for serious people” with shows August 1 – 5.

ALBERTA KENNEL CLUB CLASSIC
Check out this destination dog show with exhibitors, vendors and judges from around the world from August 3 – 6.

HERITAGE DAY AT FORT CALGARY
Celebrate Heritage Day at the very place Calgary began on August 6, with free museum tours, a Blackfoot ecology education session, Indigenous artisans, a family friendly movie, kids crafts and much more!

STEVE MARTIN AND MARTIN SHORT
If their names alone don’t set the tone, their aptly titled show certainly does — An Evening You Will Forget for the Rest of Your Life is in town August 4th.

ART CAMP FOR ADULTS AT CSPACE
Focused on the themes of play, recharge and wonder, these two back-to-back weekend camps will see a different guided art activity each evening.

TINARIWEN
Listen to this Grammy-Award winning group of Tuareg musicians from the Sahara Desert region of northern Mali as they perform at the Bella Concert Hall on August 7.

Photo Courtesy Joachim Cooder.

RY COODER
The legendary guitarist, songwriter and producer returns to his Americana roots with covers of old blues, gospel and folk songs on Prodigal Son, plus a few new originals. His first album of six years aims to give a message of hope and resilience. See him August 10.

MUSIC IN THE PLAZA AT HERITAGE PARK
No matter the weather, Wednesday evenings throughout the month of August will fill Heritage Town Square with live music!

ANDERSON EAST 
Get whisked away with the soulful sounds of this Alabama native on August 12, who’s touring his second studio album Encore. East’s gravelly voice will glide effortlessly through expertly crafted songs that blend blues, R&B and country.

GIPSY KINGS
On August 12, “Bamboleo” all the way to the show!

PEELED COCKTAIL FESTIVAL
From August 16 – 19 experience seminars, tastings and networking events, all centered around the enjoyment and development of Calgary’s cocktail scene.

BEN HARPER & CHARLIE MUSSELWHITE
The American blues musicians join forces for their collaborative new album, No Mercy in This Land. See them August 20. 

Photo courtesy Kelly Hofer.

ALICE COOPER
On August 22, the founder of shock-rock returns to Calgary for a night of theatrics and psycho-drama. A Paranormal Evening will undoubtedly live up to Cooper’s signature performances, where heavy metal and punk rock meet horror show, electric chairs, guillotines and fake blood.

CALGARY PRIDE
Running from August 24 – September 3, Calgary’s best and brightest will be on display at the 28th annual Calgary Pride Week, in celebration of diversity, inclusivity and community. From humble and difficult beginnings, the Calgary Pride Parade has grown to become the second largest parade in the city and is followed by Pride in the Park, where live music and beer gardens continue the festivities.

HONENS
After quarter finals in Berlin and New York, the world-class international piano competition declares a winner in Calgary. From August 30 – September 8.

 

Hot Art Round-Up: Jul 26 – 29

By HOT ART YYC

 

THURSDAY, JULY 26

39th Annual Calgary Folk Music Festival
July 26 – July 29

Killer of Sheep / Screening
Globe Cinema, The New Gallery: 7 – 9:30 pm

 

FRIDAY, JULY 27

Deep State Prosthetics by Johnathan Onyschuk
The lily contemporary project space, 7 – 11 pm

Public Event: Tea of the Day
WRECK CITY, July 27 – Aug 12 (6 – 9 pm)

WRECK CITY Residency + Exhibition
WRECK CITY, July 27 – Aug 12 (various times and venues)

 

SATURDAY, JULY 28

Betzalel Arts Exhibition – New Works
Calgary JCC, through August 26

Farmers & Makers Market at cSPACE
cSPACE, 10 am – 3 pm

YYC Alternative Market
Inglewood Community Association Hall, 10 am – 4 pm

Beltline Garden Party & Dog Parade at Lougheed House
Lougheed House, 11 am – 4 pm

Building Bridges Through Arts: Pan-Asian-Canadian Art Experience
Arts Commons, noon – 5 pm

July ATC Workshop and Trading Session
Rumble House, noon – 7 pm

 

SUNDAY, JULY 29

Kensington’s Fantasy Faire
Kensington, 11 am – 5 pm

Open House | Jolie Bird: 1597; Harmonious Frequencies
Esker Foundation, 1:30 – 3 pm

Stryker: Four Afternoons of Indigenous Cinema
Untitled Art Society, 2 – 4 pm

How To Shop Calgary’s Outlets

By LEAH VAN LOON

Photo courtesy Nordstrom Rack.

Is this really a great deal? Did that come from the mainline store? These tips will help you balance bargains versus style at discount department stores:

Everyone loves getting a good deal so it’s surprise that Calgary has seen some new department store outlets open in the last few years, most notably Nordstrom Rack and Saks Off Fifth. Add to it the name recognition of large department stores selling big name designers and the expectations grow even higher. So what should you expect from shopping at a department store outlet?

While the main department stores have a very set program of sale periods and discount promotions, the outlets have new merchandise coming in all the time. They also have their own sale schedule and clearances for even deeper discounts. At first glance the price may seem right, but it pays to remember that designer items sent to the outlet from the main store are not in season, which is one reason you are getting a deal.

Other reasons why you could find a previously regular-priced item at an outlet might be overstock, fit or quality issues, a strange colour, style or print, it was overlooked in a stockroom, or it was altered for a customer and the store ended up with it. Surprisingly, only around 20 percent of items at an outlet are actually goods that were for sale at a mainline store at full price and are now marked down. Many pieces are even made directly by designer brands for the department store outlets using less expensive materials and inferior construction to provide that brand name for less — so if you are seeing a price for you to compare it to, it may not be a sale price versus a regular price so much as a reminder of what the brand’s clothing usually sells for at the main store.

Fear not, you can still find bargains at the outlets, but the best way to get a real deal (and a deal on something real) is to also shop the regular store. Occasionally the clearance opportunities and promotions at the main store will show an even better deal on an item than when you see it at the outlet, so it pays to check in, especially at sale time. If you are familiar with the brands you can learn to recognize a bargain when you see it and even how to spot a made-directly- for-the-outlet item. You can also shop the outlets online and find items not available at your own local brick-and-mortar —just make sure you can still get a refund.

Happy shopping, and remember: it’s only a good deal if it’s something you’ll actually wear!

 

 

Hot Art Round-Up: Jul 19 – 22

By HOT ART YYC

THURSDAY, JULY 19

Brandon Giessmann / Projections ± Predispositions
TRUCK Contemporary Art in Calgary, 9 – 9 pm

Mitchell Chalifoux / Young Man’s Fancy
Alberta Printmakers, 6 – 7 pm

Jaime McDonald: starting and not necessarily ending
Arts Commons, Untitled Art Society: 6 – 7 pm

Plus 15 Window Gallery Exhibition / Henry Heng Lu
Arts Commons, The New Gallery: 6 – 8 pm

Lusine Manukyan – A Toast
Marion Nicoll Gallery, 6 – 7 pm

“Everything Summer” Artist Reception and Art Sale
Motion Gallery, starts at 6 pm

RAW Calgary: Connect
Marquee Beer Market & Stage, 7 pm – midnight

 

FRIDAY, JULY 20

BUMP Launch Party – Part II – Updated
Central Memorial Park, 4 – 11 pm

3D Show II Opening Reception
Motion Gallery, 7 – 9 pm

 

SATURDAY, JULY 21

Bee Kingdom Glass Sale and Free BBQ
July 21 & 22, noon – 5 pm

Farmers & Makers Market at cSPACE
cSPACE, 10 am – 3 pm

Five AM Presents Geneva Haley
Five Art & Merchandise, 7 – 10 pm

Public Event: Charlie Chaplin Film Screening/Film Shoot
WRECK CITY, EMMEDIA Gallery & Production Society: 7 – 8:30 pm

 

SUNDAY, JULY 22

Rhymes for Young Ghouls: Four Afternoons of Indigenous Cinema
Untitled Art Society, 2 – 4 pm

5 Places Outside of Calgary to Visit This Summer

By KYLEE PEDERSEN

From awe-inspiring national parks to fascinating historical sites, there is plenty to experience beyond the city limits. Take a quick day drive or plan a weekend away around a visit to one (or all!) of these must-see stops.

Photo courtesy Michael Matt

WATERTON LAKES NATIONAL PARK
Nature has revived the prairies, shorelines and mountainsides of Waterton with new growth since the park was affected by the Kenow Wildfire at the end of summer last year. While some areas of the park remain closed, the Upper, Middle and Lower Waterton lakes, as well as the townsite, entrance road and Chief Mountain Highway, are open and ready to be explored. Camp, canoe, kayak, bike, hike, spot wildlife and take in the incredible natural beauty of the national park. Waterton is a three hour drive due south of Calgary.

LIVE LONG AND PROSPER
See Christopher Reeve’s Superman 3cape and take a seat in Tom Hardy’s Shinzon Captain’s chair at the eccentric Trekcetera museum in Drumheller, just an hour and a half northeast of Calgary. Canada’s only Star Trek museum goes beyond the final frontier to include a plethora of props and costumes from an array of films and artifacts from the Titanic and the U.S. 7th Cavalry. With experience on film sets and insightful anecdotes, the curator of the museum makes the displays at Trekcetera come alive.

Photo courtesy Frank Slide Interpretive Centre

LEITCH COLLIERIES
In 1907 when the Leitch Colliery was opened it was considered the most cutting-edge mining operation in Canada. Although the mine was only in operation for ten years, the stone remains of the mine’s powerhouse invoke a once grand operation. Take a scenic drive south of Calgary along highway 22 to Crowsnest Pass to learn more about the lives of the miners who worked there, the surrounding town, and the untimely demise of the fruitful business.

FATHER LACOMBE CHAPEL
This small wooden chapel is Alberta’s oldest standing building, constructed in 1861 by the Métis community who lived in what is now St. Albert. The chapel was part of the Roman Catholic mission led by Father Albert Lacombe. Make the three-hour trip north of Calgary to get a tour of not only the chapel, but its accompanying crypt, grotto and cemetery.

OKOTOKS ERRATIC
If it’s natural history you’re looking for, don’t miss the geological wonder of the world’s largest known glacial erratic, located just south of Calgary near the city of Okotoks. Here, jutting out of the prairie horizon, sits 16,500 tons of quartzite; a massive rock formation which looks as if it has been dropped from the sky. But in fact, Big Rock got a ride from a glacier thousands of years ago and assumed its final resting place when the ice receded.